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COIiliEGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, September, 26, 1916 



Ho. 1 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Football Prospects 

With the opening of the 1916 foot- 
ball season less than a week distant, 
prospects point to a very successful 
season for Lebanon Valley despite 
the unusually hard schedule. We 
have a full team of veterans on hand, 
and added to these, the new men on 
the squad are showing football abil- 
ity. Only three men are lost from 
last year's team, Hollinger, Von 
Bereghy, and Bechtel, and although 
they will be missed Coach Guyer 
should not have cause for anxiety 
with the influx of new material and 
the likely looking candidates from 
last year's Scrubs. 

Nearly every position on the team 
will be held this fall by the veterans 
of last year, for it is considered un- 
likely that any of them can be dis- 
lodged from their former positions, 
but there is ample room on the squad 
for substitutes of the first order. 
Among the new backfield candidates 
are Goff, a star back from the Mis- 
souri Military Academy, Kickline, 
who formerly helped Ursinus win a 
victory over Penn, Forsburg, of Pat- 
ton, Pa., Winneshiek, substitute cen- 
ter on the Carlisle Indian School 
team of last year, Hummel, of Beil- 
wood High, and Snader, of Ephrata, 
Pa. A few of the line candidates 
are Koslek, of Wilkes-Barre, Stahl, 
of Sunbury, and Lynn, of Clearfield 
High. Prom last year's Scrubs Peif- 
fer, Snavely, Shetter, Goodyear, and 
Rupp, backs, and Lerew, Gonder, 
Buckwalter, Potter, and Kleinfelter, 
linemen look the most promising. 

Nearly every afternoon during the 
Past week hard scrimmages were 
held, and the men are getting in fine 
shape for the game with the Army 
on Saturday. On account of the epi- 
demic of infantile paralyis in the 
vicinity of the Military Academy, 
p hilip Hayes, football representative 
at the United States Military Acad- 
emy, West Point, New York, has sent 
to Manager Paul S. Wagner of the 
Lebanon Valley football team the fol- 
lowing memorandum, which is being 
made public for the benefit of those 
^ho may have planned to accom- 
pany the team on their trip next Sat- 
urday : 



Lebanon Valley 

Formally Opens 

The formal opening of the fall 
term of Lebanon Valley College, lo- 
cated at Annville, Lebanon county, 
Pa., took place on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 20, at 9 a. m., the two pre- 
vious days being devoted to exam- 
inations and matriculations. 




The College starts its fifty-first 
year with the largest attendance in 
its history, all dormitories crowded, 
many of the students rooming in the 
town. An event of a pleasing nature 
took place at this formal opening 
when Rev. G. D. Gossard, D. D., presi- 
dent of the College removed "Old 
Glory" from the portrait of Hiram 
E. Steinmetz, of this borough, with 
appropriate remarks, stating that Mr. 
Steinmetz is an alumnus of the col- 
lege of the class of 1874, and pre- 
sents this portrait to the college to 
be placed in the Hiram E. Steinmetz 
Memorial Room in Soutfi Hall, a 
room once occupied by him and two 
other young men who have gone to 
the "Great Beyond." 

The portrait was painted from a 
photograph of his graduation. The 
cut here produced was taken from 
that photograph. Mr. Steinmetz re- 
sponded in a happy and humorous 
manner giving reminiscences, amus- 
ing stories coupled with sound ad- 
vice to the students, his proposed trip 
to the Pacific coast next year and to 



Students' Reception 

— i i 

The Annual Students' Reception 
was given by the Y. M. and Y. W. 
C. A. on Saturday evening in the col- 
lege gymnasium. The gymnasium 
was fittingly decorated with L. V. 
pennants and banners. The new stu- 
dents seemingly felt as much at home 
as the old ones and the programme, 
arranged by the associations, was 
enthusiastically received • by the 
guests. The Philokosmian Orchestra, 
which occupied the balcony, added 
greatly to the evening's enjoyment. 
Following the programme refresh- 
ments were served by the joint social 



Y. M. C. A. 

The first meeting of the Y. M. C. 
A. was a very interesting one and 
was marked by a large attendance of 
both old and new men. Mr. Edwin 
Zeigler, president of the organization 
had charge of the meeting. After 
the singing several old spirited 
hymns, scripture lesson and prayer, 
Prof. H. H. Shenk gave the address 
of the hour, speaking on the subject 
of the Purpose and Usefulness of the 
Y. M. C. A. The Y. M. C. A. move- 
ment is one of the greatest move- 
ments of today. Many great men 
of today have been made through the 
work of the Y. M. C. A. John R. 
Mott is an example of this. Not only- 
does the movement include one 
phase of life, but it includes the phy- 
sical, the moral and religious; it 
touches the industrial and social life. 
The speaker showed the possibilities 
of the Y. M. C. A. as a life-work and 
gave examples of men from Lebanon 
Valley who are making a success in 
the work. The address was interest- 
ing and helpful and was greatly ap- 
preciated by all who heard it. Let 
us make this a banner year for the 
Y. M. C. A., and this can be accom- 
plished if everyone takes an interest 
and attends the meetings. 



EDITOR OF "NEWS" RESIGNS 



Continued on Page 3 



Continued on Page 4 



Due to the resignation of Abram 
M. Long, Editor of the "News" dur- 
ing 1916, Charles H. Loomis '17 has 
been elected by the faculty to fill the 
vacancy. His duties begin with this 
first issue of the college year. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuis 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOM IS, 



Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Addre&s all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebancn 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
artic'es for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 

EDITORIAL. 



Why did you come to college? 

The motives that prompt young 
men and women to enter college can 
be classified under three general 
heads which are very well illustrated 
by this simple story. 

An American, standing on a wharf 
in Japan was accosted by a laborer 
who was wheeling freight. The 
coolie as he passed with his load, 
looked up and said in his pigeon 
English, "Come buy cargo?" mean- 
ing to inquire if the stranger had 
come out to Japan on commercial 
business. Receiving a reply in the 
negative he framed a new question 
and said, as he passed the second 
time, "Come look an' see?" by which 
he meant to ask if the stranger was 
a tourist who had come to see the 
country Not yet getting the infor- 
mation he wanted he conjured one 
more motive, and, the third time he 
trundled his barrow by, the question 
was, "Spec' die soon?" that is was 
the stranger there for his health? 

To which class do you belong? 

If you are here for your health, 
you will accomplish nothing worth 
while, but will merely be a burden 
for your fellow students to carry 
along. 



If you belong to the second class 
and have come simply to view the 
country, you will soon find that your 
role, as a spectator, will be dry and 
monotonous. 

If, however, your case is illustrated 
by the first question, and, you art, 
here for business, you are to be com- 
mended for having the true concept 
tion of college life. Get a definite 
purpose now as you begin your col- 
lege career, and keeping that pur- 
pose constantly before you, work 
with all the zeal that you possess. 



CLIO. PROGRAM SEPT. 29 



Current Events E. Wommer 

Violin Solo K. Kreider 

Reminiscences of Vacation. .Hilda Colt 

Piano Solo Erma Rhoades 

Reading Violet Mark 

Sketch. .R. Loser, K. Ruth, H. Bubb, 

F. Durbin 
Chorus Society 



KALO PROGRAM FOR SEPT. 29, 16 



"Was Haben Wir Hier" 

C. Kleinfelter 

Infantile Paralysis. . . .W. H. Kochel 

Reading F. D. Beidel 

Debate, Resolved, That the Brother- 
hood Railroad employees were jus- 
tified in their demands upon their 
employers. 

Affirmative Negative 
W. N. Martin A. M Long 

P. E. V. Shannon R. H. Keim 

Quartette: P. Hilbert, L. Walters, 

G. Greer, H. Ramsey. 

Mind Power C. E. Shannon 

The Examiner Editor 



PHILO PROGRAM FOR SEPT. 29, 16 



Resume Calvin F. F. Fencil 

Reading Harold RiFser 

Debate, Resolved, That Government 
Ownership of all Public Industries 
would eliminate present Labor 
Problems. 

Affirmative Negative 
C. C. Kratzer Norman C. Potter 
J. 0. Zeigler F. B. Snavely 

Vocal Duet. .J. 0. Zeigler and D. T. 

Gregory. 

Sketch.. Jos. H. Jackowiak, Ray- 
mond S. Heberlig, Ralph Sloat, 
Harry Baker. 
Visitors welcome. 



Every one desires to live long, but 
no one would be old. — [Swift. 



Beauty is like an almanac; if it 
last a year it is well. — [T. Adams. 

No man can be brave who consid- 
ers pain the greatest evil of life; or 
temperate, who regards pleasure as 
the highest good. — [Cicero. 



PERSONALS. 

Miss Mary Bassler, of Kutztown, 
visited Miss Helen Ziegler over Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 



The Clionian Literary Society was 
honored by the presence of Miss 
Josephine Matthias and Miss Emma 
Kreider at its opening program. 



Mr. Wm. Mickey, '16, and Mr. Earl 
Eichelberger attended the Students' 
Reception on Saturday. 



Mr. Jacob Mellow is spending a 
few days at L. V. before taking up 
his studies at U. of P. 



Coach Guyer entertained his broth- 
er, Mr. George Guyer, over the week- 
end. 



Mr. John Lerew, '15, visited his 
brother and sister here last week. 



Miss Ruth Engle, '15, was among 
the guests who returned for the Stu- 
dents' Reception. 

Miss Elta Weaver is entertaining 
Miss Ruth Steinhauer at her home 
on Maple street. 

— o — 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Wolfe, Miss Flor- 
ence Wolfe and Miss Ethel Mutch 
visited Miss Violet W r olfe at Senior 
Hall on Thursday. 



WEDDING BELLS 



During the summer two of the al- 
umni, both of the class of 1916, were 
united in the holy bonds of matri- 
mony. 

— o — 

On June 28, at Dallastown, Pa. 
Mr. J. Stuart Innerst, '16, was mar- 
ried to Miss Marion Reachard. Mr. 
Innerst was a prominent figure while 
at school, taking special interest in 
uplifting the school spiritually. 

At York, Pa., Mr. C. Guy Staffl- 
bach, '16, was married to Miss Glen- 
na Damuth, September 3. Mr. Stam- 
bach, is also studying for the minis- 
try and while at school took great 
delight in ministerial work. 

Both couples left for the Bone 
brake Theological Seminary at Day- 
ton, Ohio, where they will take work 
this year. The "College News" jo' n8 
with their many friends in extend- 
ing to them our heartiest congratu- 
lations and wishing the best of s uC 
cess. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 



Continued From Page 1 



"'Memorandum — upon the recom- 
mendation of the Sargent, the Super- 
intendent approves playing the 
scheduled game of football Septem- 
ber 30th with Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege with the understanding that 
xmly such persons as are necessary 
for the game be allowed to enter the 
reservation. This includes the Leba- 
non Valley team, substitutes, train- 
er, coaches and officials, but no 
•spectators in general." 



Y. W. C. A. 

"On Sunday at one o'clock the Y. 
W. C. A. held its first meeting of the 
year. The services were led by the 
president, Miss Heffelman, who gave 
.an extremely interesting and helpful 
; talk on the Aim of the Association. 
It is the purpose of the Y. W. C. A. 
to unite the girls into closer fellow- 
ship with Christ, and to lead a life 
of service. She brought out very 
clearly the religious as well as the 
social side of the organization. 
Miss Schmidt favored the association 
with a solo, which was as usual 
greatly appreciated by the girls. 



"MUSICAL NOTES 



Mr. P. M. Linebaugh '16 of York, 
has two large classes in Harrisburg 
.and York. He also has the position 
x>f church organist in Zion Reformed 
Church of York, Pa. 



Miss Luella Hertzler '16 has a 
sdass in her home town, Manheim. 

— — 

Misses Ruth Strickler of Lebanon 
and Lillian Gantz of Annville are at 
home. 



The following have returned for 
their degree (Mus. B.): J. Fred Arn- 
old '14 of Lebanon; Miss Luella Bat- 
dorf, graduate of Convent School of 
Music. Lancaster and Mr. P. M. Line- 
baugh of York. 



Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt, Profes- 
sor of Voice, spent six weeks at Cor- 
nell University, Ithaca, N. Y., taking 
up the Supervisors Course. 



Who thinketh to buy villainy with 
Sold shall find such faith so bought, 
:PO sold. — [Marston. 

When Patron 



NEW SENATE RULING FOR SOPH- 
OMORES AND FRESHMEN 



At a recent meeting of the men's 
student governing association, the 
Senate, a new ruling was adopted 
whereby the old form of poster scrap 
is eliminated from the annals of in- 
terclass contests.' The reasons for 
such action were obviously the un- 
equal and often unfair matching 
that occurs in such scraps and also 
a desire on the part of the Senate to 
localize inter-class contests. Anoth- 
er form of contest may be substi- 
tuted. 



CALENDER 



Wednesday, 7 P. M. — Mathemat- 
ical Round Table in Dr. Lehman's 
room. 



Friday, 7.15 P. 
ciety sessions. 



M. — Literary So- 



— — 

Saturday — Football, Lebanon Val- 
ley vs. West Point at AVest Point : 
N. Y. 



Sunday — 9 A. M., Sunday School; 
10.15, Preaching services; 1 P. M., 
Christian Association meetings; 6.00 
P. M., Christian Endeavor Society. 



Tuesday, 6.15 P. M. — Student 
Prayer Meeting in Auditorium of Li- 
brary. 



A man who cannot mind his own 
business is not to be trusted with 
that of the king. — [Saville. 

DR. SAMUEL B. GROW 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 




Ashby-V^ Lexicon-^ 



COLLARS 

1 S c«o. each, 6 lor 90 c*s. 
CLUETT, PEA BO DY »CCl \NC.W<£RS 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. Annville, P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL HASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
bst. 

If you examine our shirt, colkr and cuff 
work you will surely send ycurs to the 

Hernhey Laundry 

F.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

TUB BeflpatH-BFOGRwag Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 



H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



The College Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops, Seal Jewelry. 
Best Quality of Leather Novelties 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 
The Lucky Curve Variety 

D. B. BASHORE 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 

zinjt Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Was Good Once, 

A certain well known composer now 
In tbe full vigor of his established 
reputation was at one time when he 
was comparatively unknown engaged 
in writing the music for a production 
fathered by two managers who knew 
exactly what they wanted, in addition 
to knowing next to nothing Of tfce 
musical classics. After having burned 
much midnight oil and worked him- 
self into a state of semicollapse in a 
vain endeavor to produce a finale 
which would please them the compos- 
er tore up page after page of rejected 
manuscript and in despair took to the 
theater an entire section of "Faust" to 
which he had somehow managed to fit 
the words assigned to him. He played 
It over, and one of the managers said 
quite unfeelingly, "Well, Gus, the oth- 
ers were pretty bad, but this one is 
the rottenest of them all." "So?" re- 
marked the weary musician dryly, "it 
was considered good when Gounod 
wrote it!" 



You are correct it you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & American Lady £1 oe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



EMERY SHIRTS 

KNOWN AS THE BEST 

THE BEST KNOWN 

Every Emery shirt is desig"ned- 
cut and tailored to the big best stand, 
ard of perfection. 

Our handgome Spring Silk and 
Madras Shirts the kind good dress- 
ers like. 

$1.00 to $3.50 

J. S. Bashore 

Clothier 

Lebanon Penna 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 

Hagerstown, Maryland. 



LEBANON VALLEY FOR. 
MALLY OPENS 



Continued from page i 



give an account thereof next Septem- 
ber. Prof. J. E. Lehman, A. M. Sc. 
D., the oldest member of the faculty 
in point of service, also spoke. He 
was a roommate, classmate, chum 
and yet an intimate friend of Mr. 
Steinmetz. 

Before Mr. Hiram E. Steinmetz 
spoke the audience sang "America." 

A sketch of Mr. Steinmetz is in 
order. After graduation he resided 
at Clay for a period of twenty-five 
years. He first read law with his 
uncle, J. L. Steinmetz, as his pre- 
ceptor. Failing eyesight compelled 
him to quit this, although he is yet 
a registered law student. He has 
been connected with the newspaper 
fraternity for a period of forty years, 
first associationg with Peter B. Fid- 
ler, of Hopeland, as editor of the 
"Clay Township Record." He was 
twenty-three years in the postal ser- 
vice at Clay post office. He was 
twenty-one years clerk in his fath- 
er's store at Clay and conducted the 
business himself for a period of four 
years. He held several minor of- 
fices. 

Mr. Steinmetz is devoted to the 
cause of education in all its lines 
and since residing in this borough is 
regarded a prominent and influential 
citizen in church and state. Presi- 
dent Gossard also announced that the 
new Moeller pipe organ, to be install- 
ed at a cost of $3600, will be named 
in his honor, as he is furnishing the 
bulk with more to follow. 



As a Police Cashier. 

*'Ha!" said MrSnifter. when he met 
McDougall. "Did you hear about my 
brither's new job? He's beeu appoint- 
ed cashier at n police station." 

"Na!" said McDougall. "1 heard nae 
word o' that. Cashier at a police sta- 
tion? An' what doe-\ he do at that 
Job?" 

"Weel. man, it's like this." answered 
McSnifter as he made tracks off. "he 
counts the 'coppers' as they come in." 
— London Telegraph. 



Disappears. 

There is a town in England which 
when you approach it disappears 
Seems impossible, doesn't it? But It 
Is quite true. The town is In Norfolk, 
and its name is Diss. Thus, you see. 
when you approach it Diss appears.— 
Pearson's. 



More Like It. 

"Now they say they can weigh the 

conscience." 
"By the ounce?" 

"I imagine by the scruple."— Kansas 
City Journal. 



People who grumble in cloudy weath- 
er usually wear veils when the sob 
shines. 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CR.EA 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 



KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT & DITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, V'Neck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St. Borta l 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



W. Main St. 



AnnVille, Pa 



Just Received a Nov Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. R. LU8ISKEY|YIflfl 



Queen St. 



Annville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 



EATS? 

GOLLAMS 



GOT *KM 



Xebanon 7/alley 
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Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
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Write for information 

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CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



MORRIS CIANDONATO'S 

Electric Shoe Shop 

Shoes repaired by machinery give bet- 
ter results than hand work. 
Shop Work Done While You Watt. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Prices right 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 




COIiliEGE 



4 T-r k 

Unfits II I.cfevcr 9 16 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, October, 3, 1916 



Jio. 2 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Football Game First Meeting of "Gus" Zeigler Wins 

at West Point Math, Round Table Tennis Tournament 



A rousing mass meeting was held 
in the College Chapel on Thursday- 
evening to give the boys inspiration 
for the game at "West Point. Hand 
books were distributed containing 
the college songs and yells, and un- 
der the direction of the two cheer 
leaders, Messrs. Williams and Price 
the chapel resounded with songs and 
cheers. Timely remarks were made 
by Prof. Frost and Dr. Rutherford, 
old alumnus, Professors Shroyer and 
Kirkland, Coach Guyer and ex-Cap- 
tain Swartz. On Friday morning the 
College Band and entire student body 
accompanied the team to the train. 
The enthusiastic send-off was very 
encouraging to the team and had 
much to do with the splendid show- 
ing made by the boys at West Point. 
What the New York Tribune says about 
the game. 

West Point, N. Y., Sept. 30. — The 
Cadets started their football season 
last Saturday with a close margin 
victory over Lebanon Valley. Vidal, 
the South Dakota lad, of whom much 
is expected in goal kicking this sea- 
son, tallied three points for the sol- 
diers when he booted a pretty field 
goal from the 2 5 -yard mark in the 
second quarter. 

It was all the Army men could get, 
for their running game stalled when 
the collegians' line held fast, and 
although West Point showed plenty 
of driving power between the 20- 
yard lines, when it came to the crit- 
ical moments even such slashing 
backs as Oliphant and Vidal failed 
to smash down the visitors' stonewall 
defence. 

Once in the second quarter Vidal 
hurled a beautiful pass to Shrader 
at the extreme corner of the field, but 
the latter's foot projected an inch 
over the outside line and the touch- 
down went for nothing. 



Continued on Page 3 
STAR COURSE. 



Within the next few days the Star 
Course Committee will distribute 
folders enclosing the list of attrac- 
tions, dates and other information 
concerning this year's Star Course. 
This will be followed by a ticket can- 
vass of the student body. The course 
« run under the auspices of the 
Christian Association and has for its 
Primary object, on financial gain, but 
to bring to you something in the line 
°f educational entertainment which 
otherwise would not be available. 
*ou can aid materially in making it 
* success by purchasing a season 
"cket early. Please co-operate. 



Nothing is quite so interesting nor 
yet so enlightening as is the dis- 
cussion of topics relating to the on- 
ly "exact science," Mathematics. 
It is for the enjoyment of this pleas- 
ure that many years ago, there 
sprung up under the kindly direction 
of Pro. Dr. Lehman, an association, a 
club, a group of people, known as 
the Math Round Table, whose pur- 
pose it is to discuss all topics of cur- 
rent influence in the scientific world, 
relating especially to the mathemat- 
ically phases and precisions thereof. 
This organization held its first meet- 
ing on Wednesday evening, Septem- 
ber 27, at 6:30 in Prof. Lehman's 
class room. 

The first topic under discussion 
was "The Mathmetmatics which I 
forgot during vacation," by John 
Herring and using his own logic, he 
convinced us along the pschycologic- 
al lines, that he forgot very little. 
The second topic, "Early Mathemat- 
ics" by Ella Nutch was ably discuss- 
ed both by the author and later 
by the Round Table. 

The next meeting of the Round 
Table will be held October 25th, at 
6:30, in Prof. Lehman's room. An 
interesting program is promised and 
a hearty welcome extended to all 
lovers of the "exact science" to be 
present. 



THE SCRUB SCHEDULE. 



The football season opens for the 
Scrubs next Saturday with a game 
with Mercersburg Academy. This 
second Varsity has its work cut out 
for them the coming season if the 
record of the past year made by 
their predecessors is to be equalled. 
In 1915, only once was the scrub 
goal line crossed, when Millersville 
Normal succeeded in scoring a touch- 
down. The 1916 schedule is one 
which will tax the ability of the sec- 
ond string men, and if they win 
from Mercersburg, the Carlisle In- 
dians, and the Bucknell Reserves, 
perhaps the most difficult contests 
to be staged, they will have noth- 
ing to fear from the other opponents. 
Charles Gemmil, assistant football 
manager is to be congratulated upon 
the schedule, and we hope the Re- 
serves will be as successful in play- 
ing the games. The schedule is as 
follows: 



The final round of the tennis tour- 
nament which was postponed from 
last spring on account of inclement 
weather during Commencement 
Week, was played on Wednesday 
forenoon. Gus Zeigler was opposed 
by Dannie Walters, the "dark horse" 
of the tournament, and Zeigler prov- 
ed to be in the best condition, win- 
ning in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2. 

During the first set it was any- 
body's match, but as the battle on 
the courts progressed Gus improved 
with each play, and finally, toward 
the last, fell into his true stride, 
while Dan could not get going prop- 
erly. Zeigler, however, is a popular 
winner, and all will concede that the 
racquet awarded to the winner by 
the Athletic Association has gone in- 
to competent hands. 

There were many surprises during 
the early rounds of the tournament. 
Hal White sprung the first when he 
won from Dave Fink, and soon after- 
ward Dan Walter unexpectedly de- 
feated "Jitter" Zeigler. Then Dan 
continued his winning streak by 
triumphing over Hal, 9-11, 6-4, 6-4, 
thus entitling him to meet Gus in 
the final round. 

Tennis is becoming increasingly 
popular at Lebanon Valley, and 
there is no reason why another suc- 
cessful tournament cannot be staged 
this coming spring. Just now only 
two courts are in playing condition, 
one having been neglected during 
the summer months, but why not 
have some class volunteer to do the 
necessary repairing on this third? 
There is no question but that a stu- 
dent requires an adequate amount of 
exercise every day in order to do the 
best grade of work in the class room, 
and two tennis courts cannot accom- 
modate a student body of nearly five 
hundred. 



Continued on Page 4 



Conservatory Notes 

The enrollment of the Conserva- 
tory at present reaches 75, this be- 
ing the largest number reached for 
the opening of a school year. The 
larger number of this enrollment are 
not taking the theoretical work. 

There have been two new courses 
introduced this year. The Teachers' 
Course which offers a course in piano 
teaching and public school course. 

The prospects for the year are most 
encouraging as well as flattering and 
if the wishes and aims of the faculty 
are carried out, this year will be the 
best year of the Conservatory. 

The faculty of the Conservatory 
will entertain the students of the 
Conservatory, Tuesday evening, at 8 
o'clock. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students o'f 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 

EDITORIAL. 

Lebanon Valley has just entered 
upon her fifty-first year under cir- 
cumstances more auspicious than 
during any previous period of her 
existence. 

For fifty years, through varied 
stages of success and adversity she 
has been busy preparing men and 
women for their various positions in 
life. These fifty years have been one 
covering her formative period for 
it has been well said that no college 
should be considered successful un- 
til she has celebrated her semi-cen- 
tennial. 

The total number of graduates is 
Dot great but the rate of increase 
each year has been very gratifying 
and shows she has not been standing 
still or that she means to mark time 
In the future. 

The success of any school is large- 
ly dependent upon the loyalty and 
enthusiasm of her students and 
alumni. The amount of work done 
in a school is not governed entirely 
by the faculty but rather by what 
the btudents will do. The coach 
doesn't win athletic contests by 
^merely telling the men how much 
they will have to do, it is what the 
men are willing to do. So it is 
true of every department and each 
student should feel it a duty and 
privilege to raise to the maximum 
the amount he accomplishes in every 
department in which he is Inter- 
ested. 



A good way to show loyalty to 
your school is to adopt an aggressive 
and active "college spirit." By the 
new student particularly college spir- 
it may be misinterpreted, it should 
be above all a spirit of service rath- 
er than of negligence, one that will 
lead a man to attend all mass meet- 
ings, athletic contests, social func- 
tions of the school and the like with 
the regularity with which he at- 
tends classes. It should lead him 
to obey rules rather than to ignore 
them and teach him that at all times 
an institution is judged by her rep- 
resentatives. 

Let each student, old and new, get 
such a spirit and at once a great 
step will have been taken toward a 
yet greater Lebanon Valley for the 
future. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



BABY PARTY 



The old girls sought for an nov- 
el way to entertain, by which that 
strong barrier of reserve would be 
broken down between them and the 
new girls. A baby party was just 
the thing. Since children are not 
responsible for their outbursts of 
emotions they readily gave vent to 
crying spells, quarrels and child- 
hood games. Such nursery frolics 
as Little Sally Water, London Bridge 
and There Came Four Dukes A Rid- 
ing, were strenuously played. 

Perhaps it would have been advis- 
able from the standpoint of grown- 
ups to have had a cople of nurses, 
but the youngsters had a better time 
without them. Babies from tn. 
long dress period to 14 years, play- 
ed together and even accepted th i 
little coon, who delighted in kissing 
every one. The remarkable feature 
of the party was the defiance of the 
sandman by the babies-in-arms. How 
the kiddies clamored fdr the refresh- 
ments. The maids could scarcely 
serve quickly enough. 

"Heilman's Malted Milk" was gulp- 
ed down with a rush while the poor 
animals lost their heads and tails in 
the flood. The peppermint sticks 
acted as lifo preservers and the chil- 
dren were sent home at the early 
hour of 10 p. m. 



Miss Schaak Entertains 



The following people were "delight- 
fully entertained by Miss Helen 
Schaak over the week-end at Gretna 
Pines, Mt. Gretna; Miss Seaman, 
"Buddy" Schaak, "Clipper" Beidler, 
"Polly" Colt, "Jousey" Gamble, 
"Betty" Gallatin, "Marcus" Engle, 
"Mr." Mark, "Kiddie" Fasnacht, 
"Douggie" Beidler, "Kid" Snavely, 
"Hopper" Kreider, "Jack" Horn, 
"Peaches" Snoke, "Bobby" Burtner, 
"Sprinter" Potter, "Miles o' smiles" 
Morrison, "Sally Mauder" Gemmill. 



CLIO PROGRAMME OCTOBER 6 

Piano Solo Florence Bashore 

Paper Elizabeth Galletin 

Reading Katharine Harris 

Vocal Solo Mary Lutz 

Sketch — Life of Hetty Green 

Ruth Haines 

Olive Branch Editor 

Chorus Society 



A. H. Kleffman, '16, after spend- 
ing a few days at L. V., left last 
Thursday for Princeton Seminary, 
where he will take up studies this 
year. , 

— — 

M. Von Bereghy, '16, during the 
summer enlisted in the U. S. army. 
Mr. Von Bereghy is First Class Quar- 
ter-Master Sergeant. 

L. S. Ernst, '16, has been em- 
ployed in the offices of the American 
Iron and Steel company, Lebanon, 
during the summer. 

Paul E. Witmeyer, '16, has secur- 
ed the position of instructor of 
Chemistry and Physics in the 
High School at Plymouth, Pa. 



A. E. Shonk, V. Earl Light, J. K. 
Hollinger and Frank Shearer, all of 
the class of '16, have been appointed 
instructors in Lebanon High school. 

D. Mason Long, '16, is Boys' Sec- 
retary at the Schooler Y. M. C. A., 
Danville, Va. 

Jacob F. Shenberger, '16, is tak- 
ing up studies in the Medical school, 
University of Pennsylvania. 

S. Huber Heintlzeman, '16, has 
been appointed Boys' Secretary in 
the Y. M. C. A., at Laurel, Miss. 

Ralph E. Crabill, '16, is instruc- 
tor in the Missouri Military Acad- 
emy, Mexico, Missouri. 

— o — 

H. S. Dando, '16, will enter Drew 
Seminary, Madison, N. Y., to take ui> 
ministerial subjects. 

David J. Evans, '16, is Boys* Sec- 
retary and Instructor of Physical 
Culture at the . M. C. A., Kannapo- 
lis, N. C. 

Raymond H. Light, '16, has been 
appointed Principal of the High 
School, at Jonestown, Pa. 

— o — 

John Long, '16, is an instructor 
and coach of athletics at Dowing- 
town High School. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Y. W. C. A. opened on Sunday with 
a short song service, followed by a 
duet by Miss Louise Henry and Miss 
Miriam Oyer. The topic for the day 
— "Choosing the Fundamentals" was 
handled very well by Miss Dunkle 
and Miss Lutz. Are we going to 
choose the things that are best for 
us, the things that count; are we go- 
ing to let the wonderful opportuni- 
ties that surround us pass by be- 
cause of our indifference or neglect. 
The beginning of this new college 
year is a good time for us to do a 
little retrospection and see if ^ e 
cannot by well choosing make this 
year the biggest and best of any ^ e 
have had so far. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FOOTBALL GAME 

AT WEST POINT 



SOCIAL NOTES. 



Continued From Page 1 



This was the nearest the Army 
came to making a touchdown. In the 
last few minutes of play the Cadets 
launched pass after pass with- 
out effect, not one being completed. 
Vidal tried a field goal in the first 
quarter from the 35-yard line, b'lt 
ithe ball was just inches wide of the 
posts, with fine height and dis- 
tance. 



The line-up — j 
ARMY Positions 



Shrader, . 
Jones . . . 
Knight . . 
McEwan . 
Meacham, 
Eutler, . . 

Cole 

Gerhardt, 

Ford 

Olipnant, 
Vidal, . . . 



. L. E. 

. . L. T. . 

L. G. ... 

. . C. ... 

. . R. G. . 

. R. T. 

. R. E. . . 

. . Q. B. 
. . L. H. B. 
. R. H. B. 

. F. B. . 



L. V. C. 
. . Morrison 
. . . Loomis 
Buckwalter 
. . Wenrick 

Deheff 

, . . Mackert 
. W. Swartz 

Rupp 

. . . . Jaeger 
. K, Swartz 
. . . Howard 



Referee — Samp, Wisconsin. Umpire 
— Luerhing, Chicago. Head lines- 
man — Andrews, Yale. Time of per- 
iods — 10 and 8 minutes. Army scor- 
ing #oal from field — Vidal. Substi- 
tutions-: Army — House for Cole, 
Rundell for House, Place for Ford, 
Harmon for Oliphant, Green for Vi- 
dal, Schlenker for Butler. Lebanon 
Valley — Winershee for Lummis, 
Larew for Buckwalter. Adams for 
Larew, Walters for W. Swartz, Keat- 
ing for Jaeger. 



KALO PROGRAM 



Hobbies of Famous Men 

0. P. Greenawalt 

Debate, Resolved, That The Entire 
Military Strength of the United 
States' Regular Army should be 
called to the National Defense be- 
fore the National Guard. 
Affirmative Negative 
H. M. Ramsey L. R. Walters 

A. L. Boltz W. Isaces 

Vocal Solo G. Greer 

K. L. S H. S. Yetter 

Visitors heartily welcome. 
Short session. It will adjourn in 
time to attend the Chautauqua. 



PHILO PROGRAMME OCT. 6, 1916. 

Current Events Edgar Hastings 

Oration E. D. AVilliams 

Debate: Resolved, That 'Varsity 
Athletes should be given college 
credit for their participation in 
sports. 

Affirmative — Charles Horstick, Wal- 
ter E. Deibler. 

Negative — John H. Herring, Harry 
W. Katerman. 

Piano Duet. . .Joseph H. Jackowick 
and Charles Horn. 

Parody Rufus Ness 

Living Thoughts. ... .Editor Shettle 
Visitors welcome 



Miss Mary Bergdoll, who was vis- 
iting Miss Louise Henry left for 
Robesonia where she will take up her 
duties as Professor of English and 
History in the High School. 

Miss Mary Bond, of York, and Miss 
Marjie Maclvor, of New Cumberland, 
called at Senior Hall Sunday after- 
noon. 

— o — 

Misses Ella Mutch, Nettie Showers 
and Naomi Hand spent Saturday in 
Lebanon. 



Miss Mae Belle Adams, Miss Ger- 
trude Katherine Schmidt and Mrs. 
Violet Nissley Freed enjoyed an au- 
tomobile ride Sunday afternoon as 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. D. W. 
Meyer. I 4? 

Mr. Willis McNelly, '16, spent the 
week end at the college. 

— o — 

Mr. Alvin Shonk, '16, visited 
friends around the college on Satur- 
day. 

— o — 

An announcement dinner was giv- 
en by the Tan Lambda Tan girls at 
Senior Hall, Monday evening, Octo- 
ber 2nd, 1916. 

Mr. Walter Deibler visited his par- 
ents at Millersburg over the week- 
end. 

— — 

Miss Marie Richwine entertained 
her father at the college on Sunday. 

Mr. Joseph Hollinger, '16, was in 
Annville on Saturday afternoon. 



We can't have an expansive 
stretch of healthy life without an 
expansive sweep of the mind. Little- 
ness of mind, jealousy, envy, the 
tendency to gossip, looking for the 
faults rather than for the good traits 
in others, all have these adverse, 
stultifying, dwarfing influences. 

The thing to do is not to spend 
time in railing against the imaginary 
something we create and call fate, 
but to look to the within, and 
change the causes at work there, in 
order that things of a different na- 
ture may come. 

To set the face in the right direc- 
tion, and then simply to travel on, 
unmindful and never discouraged by 
even frequent relapses by the way, 
is the secret of all human achieve- 
ment. 




MARLEY 1V 2 IN. DEVON 2»4 IN. 



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Theatrical Costumes 
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Quality Work: 

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Jf you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
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Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. .:. PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



The College Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops, Seal Jewelry. 
Best Quality of Leather Novelties 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 
The Lucky Curve Variety 

D. B. BASHORK 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



THE SCRUB SCHEDULE 



Continued Prom Page 1 



Oct. 7 — Mercersburg at Mercers- 
burg. 

Oct. 14. — Palmyra at Lebanon. 
Oct. 19 — Carlisle Indians at Car- 
lisle. 

Oct. 21 — P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. at 
Annville. 

Oct. 28 — Bucknell Reserves at 
Annville. 

Nov. 4 — Scbuylkill Seminary at 
Reading. 

Nov. 11 — Palmyra at Palmyra. 

Nov. 18 — Schuylkill Seminary at 
Annville. 

*Millersville Normal at Millers- 
ville. 

Nov. 25 — Mount Joy at Mount Joy. 
Nov. 30 — Sunbury High at Sun- 
bury. 

*To be played by the Third Var- 
sity. 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & American Lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JBGOB SARGENT 



Main Street 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 

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Every Emery shirt is designed- 
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Our handsome Spring- Silk and 
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$1.00 to $3.50 

J. S. Bashore 

Clothier 

Lebanon Penna 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
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IT CAN BE DONE 

Somebody said that it couldn't be 
done, 

But he, with a chuckle, replied 
That "maybe he couldn't" but he 
would be one 
Who wouldn't say so till he tried. 
So he buckled right in, with a trace 
of a grin 
On his face. If he worried he 
hid it. 

He started to sing as he tackled the 
thing 

That couldn't be done — and he 
did it. 

Somebody scoffed: "Oh you'll never 
do that; 

At least no one has ever done it." 
But he took off his coat and he took 

off his hat, 
And the first thing we knew he'd 

begun it; 

With the lift of his chin, and a bit 
of a grin, 
Without any doubting or quiddit, 
He started to sing as he tackled the 
the thing 
That couldn't be done — and he 
did it. 

There are thousands to tell you it 
cannot be done; 
There are thousands who prophesy 
failure; 

There are thousands who point out 
to you, one by one, 
The dangers that wait to assail 
you. 

But just buckle in with a bit of a 
grin, 

Then take off your coat and go 
to it; 

Just start in to sing as you tackle 
the thing 
That "cannot be done" — and you'll 
do it. 

— Edgar A. Guest. 



The diligent fostering of a candid 
habit of mind, even in trifles, is a 
matter of high moment both to char- 
acter and opinions. — [Howson. 



BURDAN'S 
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Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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Catalogue mailed free 

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DENTIST 



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Annville, Pa- 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

Queen St. Annville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 



EATS? 

GOLLAMS 



GOT 'EM 



jCebanon l/alley 
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LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



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Hippodrome Building 



MORRIS GIANDONATO'S 

Electric Shoe Shop 

Shoes repaired by machinery give bet- 
ter results than hand work. 
Shop Work Done While You Wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Prices right 
When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That Yen Are From Lebanon Valley §^ L 



750 Cumberland St. 



LEBANON 



COLLEGE KEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October, 10, 1916 



No. 3 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Darthmouth 47 Hughes College Reserves Lose 

Lebanon Valley League Formed to Mercersburg 



Perhaps one of the greatest dis- 
appointments of the present season 
to both the student body and the 
team, at first sight, is the showing 
against Dartmouth on Saturday. 
However, taking into consideration 
the fact that two of our halfbacks, 
Swartz and Jaeger, were out of the 
game due to sickness, that Mackert 
therefore had to be stufled from 
tackle to fullback with consequent 
unexperienced men in the line, we 
cannot help but comment the team 
for even this stand against so strong 
a team as the Big Greens. 

The game opened with our receiv- 
ing at the goal posts. As was the 
case four times out of five, the kicks 
went over the goal line for a touch- 
back and L. V. started on the 20 yard 
line. Immediately there was a crash 
and Wheelock broke through the line 
for a 12 yard gain making our first 
down. Then, however, they held us 
and Wheelock punted in the fourth 
down, giving Dartmouth the play on 
the 50 yard line. Through the 
famous Cavanaugh backfield shift, 
the Greens succeeded in breaking 
through our line and repeated their 
first touchdown within the first five 
minutes. 

Directly, the first down, after we 
received this second time, Wheelock 
again ran 15 yards for a first down 
However, we made a costly fumble 
m the second rush, giving Dartmouth 
the ball on the 35 yard line and a 
comparatively easy goal. 

As a whole, L. V. had three fatal 
fumbles and Dartmouth one We 
made five first downs and Adams re- 
covered a punt. It took our team 



On Thursday evening a Republican 
rally was held in Professor Lehman'3 
room in the Administration Building 
and the local branch of the Hughes 
Republican College League formed. 
The meeting was largely attended by 
the supporters of the ex-justice, and 
opening remarks were made by Al- 
fred K. Mills, who explained the new 
college movement in politics, and 
took charge of the meeting until an 
organization had been effected and 
the various officers elected. Officers 
elected were as follows: President, 
E. Harold White, '17; Vice-president! 
Reuben Williams, '17; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Harold Risser, '17. Presi- 
dent White then took charge of the 
session and introduced the speaker of 
the evening, Professor H. H. Shenk, 
State Librarian at Harrisburg. 

Professor Shenk gave a very force- 
ful and energetic address upon the 
present political situation, and stated 
in a convincing manner the gross 
mistakes of the Wilson Administra- 
tion, showing, on the other hand, the 
peculiar fitness of Mr. "Justice" 
Hughes, by reason of his sterling 
strength of character, his deep In- 
sight into human affairs, and his ex- 
tended legislative, executive, and 
judicial experience to hold the first 
office in the land. 

Much enthusiasm was shown at 
this first rally, but "real" live times 
are promised for the future when the 
campaign gets warmed up and the 
fireworks begin. 

Y. W. AND Y. K. C. A. JOINT 
SESSION 



Continued on Page 3 

O ♦ » 

STUDENTS' EECEPTION 



Tuesday evening, Oct. 3, 1916, the 
faculty of the Conservatory enter- 
tained the students of the Conserva- 
tory. The evening was most enjoy- 
ably spent in playing various games 
the most interesting being a trip on 
the "Funcille, Frolictown and Feath 
erbrain Railway." After delicious 
refreshments were served the even- 
ing's pleasure soon came to an end. 

Many of the Conservatory teachers 
and students have secured season 
tickets for the Friday evening Ar- 
tists Course to be given in Harris- 
burg during the winter. 

The following i s the program: 

Nov. 3. Madame Gadski. 

Nov. 7. Miss Margaret W Wil- 
son. 

Dec. 8. Mr. Leopold Godowsky. 
Jan. 12. Mr. Eugen Ysaye. 
Feb. 2. Miss Emmy Destinn. 



The first joint session this year of 
the Christian Associations was held in 
the library building on Sunday at 
one o'clock. The members of the 
associations had the pleasure of lis- 
tening to Mrs. j. f. Musselman, a 
returned missionary from Africa, 
Mrs. Musselman, who is studying 
sciences at the college thi s year, is a 
native of Lebanon, and has a brother 
in Africa now who is a graduate of 
Lebanon Valley. She spoke of the 
work that the United Brethren mis- 
sionaries are doing and told of some 
of the wonderful things that are be- 
ing accomplished at the Albert 
Academy and other United Brethren 
fields. After the services a collection 
of African views which Mrs. Mussel- 
man had brought with her, were on 
exhibition for the benefit ' of those 
who attended the service. A male 
quartette was another special feature 
of afternoon. 



The "Scrubs" opened their season 
Saturday at Mercersburg Academy by 
losing to that team 18 to 0. The 
game was hard fought throughout, 
and it was because our boys could 
not get together that the opponents 
piled up so many points. Through a 
bad fumble by one of our men, and a 
clever forward pass by Mercersburg, 
the latter scored a touch-down 
within the first two minutes of play. 
This seemed to have knocked the pep 
out of our men for the first half, and 
the opposing team went through our 
line for many gains. During the sec- 
ond half, however, and especially in 
the fourth quarter, the Scrubs com- 
pletely outplayed their antagonists, 
making gain after gain by line 
plunges and end runs. The game 
ended with the ball on the Scrubs' 
ten yard line. For Mercersburg, the 
little quarterback, Howard, and Mel- 
linger starred. Rupp, Zeigler, and 
Goodyear played a fine game for the 
Scrubs. The boys were up against a 
well coached team, but after getting 
together they kept their husky oppo- 
nents on the defensive. Line-up: 

Mercersburg Lebanon Valley 

Gorman L. E. Wine 

Eisman L. T Stahl 

Steinburg , L. G Potter 

Tucker c Simmon dette 

Montgomery... R. g Looker 

Holland R. T Lynn 

I?enberg r. e Shetter 

Howard Q. B R U pp 

Street L. H. B Fulford 

Snively R. H. B. ... .Goodyear 

Mellinger F. B Snavely 

Substitutes — Mercersburg: Gibson 
for Eisman; Good for Montgomery; 
Sullivan for Street; Gooley for Tuck- 
er. Lebanon Valley: Kleinfelter for 
Simmondette; Peiffer for Fulford; 
Zeigler for Snavely; Hummel for 
Goodyear. Referee — Hucher, Vir- 
ginia. Umpire — Goddard, Spring- 
field. 



CALENDAR. 



Friday, 7:15 P. M., Literary Society 
sessions. 

Saturday, Football, 2:30 P. M.: 
Varsity vs. Villanova; Reserves vs. 
Palmyra, at Lebanon. 

Sunday, 9 A. M., Sunday school; 
10:15, preaching services; 1 P. M., 
Christian Association meetings; 
6:00 P. M., Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety; 7:00 P. M., preaching serv- 
ices. 

Tuesday, 6:15 P. M., Student Prayer 
Meeting in Auditorium of Library. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 

Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price $1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts - 

Clubs of ten 75 cts - 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



EDITORIAL. 



~ A vital problem of our Colleges to- 
day, a problem that ha s been domi- 
nant in the minds of human kind 
ever since its infancy and a problem 
that will ever continue to hold its 
place in the front ranks of the in- 
telligent mind is the great proposi- 
tion of leisure Just a s the literature 
of a nation depicts the character of 
its people, just as the amount of 
leisure in itself symbolizes growth or 
decay, in a greater measure does its 
nse portray real worth or unworth. 
There was at a time in the history of 
Greece, when its peoples were so ab- 
sorbed in the duties of life, when 
their activities were so minutely pre- 
scribed by the state that as not to 
allow of any time for the cultivation 
of the finer arts of life. The natural 
result was a static, inorganic, indi- 
vidual and community. But condi- 
tions changed. From one extreme 
they went to another, and we find in 
place of the system where individual- 
ity had no room, a system under 
which pleasure seeking became the 
primary motive in life. The leisure 
class was the highest strata of soci- 
ety; a ban wag put upon work and 
as a natural result we have a demor- 
alized, corrupt nation of people 



whose ultimate downfall was merely 
a problem for the mathematician. 

But what has all this to do with 
College life. W(hen some students 
are asked to go along to religious 
services, to participate in some phys- 
ical exercise, or to become a partner 
in some healthful sociable, the reply 
immediately comes forth that they 
have no time. Their later life is a 
living example of their preparation. 
Other students there are who appar- 
ently never have anything to do. 
When other active students are en- 
gaged in study or repose, they are 
engaged in some kind of self styled 
college prank, discomfiting the indus- 
trious to ease their own negligent 
minds. When these former students 
are engaged in recreations and exer- 
cise, the latter loaf around, a dis- 
gusted, "blue" lot, because they are 
unable to appreciate recreation. But 
what, then should a student do? In 
this, as in many other problems 
where the extremes are no apparent, 
a happy medium is the desirable con- 
dition. Not too busy with intellec- 
tual greed to neglect the physical 
wants; and not so engrossed in prac- 
tical Hedonism, and selfish enjoy- 
ment as to disregard the spiritual 
and intellectual needs of the human 
body. Instead of saying, "We don't 
have time to go to church," let us 
say "We'll make time." Instead of 
cutting class because we're unpre- 
pared, let us quit gossiping an hour 
earlier the night before. Instead of 
saying "We don't have time for exer- 
cise," let us say "We'll make time," 
even if to the slight detriment of 
some branch. For nature demands 
an accurate accounting. And the 
man or woman that neglects her, will 
sooner or later be presented with 
their account and payment will be 
exacted in full. 

In short, instead of the proverDiai 
"can't," and "don't have time," let 
us substitute "will," and "make 
time." When we have arrived at 
this stage we will as college students 
be in possession of the true guide to 
success, and when our course is run 
and our purpose on earth is ended we 
will inherit life's richest blessings, 
that come through faithful per- 
sistence and from true culture. 



PHILO PROGRAM. 



(Oct. 13, 1916.) 

Reading Paul Wagner. 

Our Freshman Class. .Isaac Boughter. 
Debate: Resolvei, That the United 
States should be more aggressive 
in acquiring new territory. 
Affirmative. Negative. 
David T. Gregory, Roy O. McLaughlin 
Hubert R. Snoke Wm. Price 

Violin Solo Roy O. McLaughlin. 

Extempore Chas. W- Gemmill. 

L. V. C.'s Recent Improvements. . . 

Jno. L. Berger. 

Visitors Welcome. 



CLASS SCRAP. 



Because of the ruling prohibiting 
the old form of poster scrap between 
the Sophomore and Freshman classes, 
no combats were expected. Both 
sides were very confident however or 
their superiority whether they tested 
it or not. But the rivalry proved too 
great and there was so much energy 
in each class that an outbreak in 
some way was necessary. A prelim- 
inary tussle was the result of a Fresh- 
man hike on Thursday night, but not 
satisfied with this, on Friday morn- 
ing after chapel, we see the accus- 
tomed scenes of an after chapel 
scrap. Coats and hats fly in all di- 
rections, the Freshmen yell rends the 
air and the contest is on. What an ex- 
citement! Everywhere are excited 
persons urging their side to do its 
best. The .fight is over, but again 
the Freshmen give their yell and 
again the Sophs with heroic effort 
strive to get the better of their rivals. 
But at the end, the Freshmen are 
given the decision, and declared the 
victors. 

DARTMOUTH, 47; 

LEBANON VALLEY, 0. 



Continued From Page 1 

quite a while to find its place against 
the opposing eleven, but that they 
did so is shown in the fact that 21 
points were scored in the first period 
and none in the last. 

The line-up was as follows: 
Dartmouth Lebanon Valley 

Dussosoit left end Morrison 

Trier left tackle Loomis 

Merrill left guard Kosleck 

Gile center Vv enrich 

Neely right guard Dehuff 

Cotton right tackle Lerew 

Emery right end Adams 

Cannell . . .quarterback Rupp 

Gerrish .... left halfback .... Keating 
Thielscher. .right halfback. . .Howard 

Duhamel fullback Mackert 

Touchdowns — Gerrish, 4; Thiels- 
cher, Duhamel, Poole. Goals from 
touchdowns — Gerrish, 5. Substitu- 
tions — Cogswell for Duf-osoit. Sala- 
dite for Cogswell. Healey for Trier, 
Yungstrom for Merrill, Barrows for 
Youngstrom, Cunningham for Gile, 
Scully for Neely, Mather for Scully, 
Jackson for Mather, Burns for Cot- 
ton, Austin for Emery, McDonough 
for Cannell, S. Holbrook for McDon- 
ough, Cannell for S. Holbrook, White 
for Gerrish, Gerrish for White, Poole 
for Gerrish, Edwards for Poole, Pon- 
der for Thielscher, Lehman for 
Duhamel. Referee — Hugh McGrath, 
of the Charles Bank Gymnasium. 
Umpire — George Brown, of the Bos- 
ton A. A. Head linesman and field 
judge — T. F. Larkin, of Holy Cross. 
Time — 10-minute periods. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CHAUTAUQUA IN ANNVILLE. 



From Friday until Tuesday were 
banner days for Annville for they 
W ere the days of her first Chautau- 
qua. Though there were scheduled 
jjut three joyous days there were in 
reality four since the services in the 
United Brethren Church Sunday 
evening were given over to the A. E. 
G. Cmpany who rendered musical se- 
lections and Dr. Frank Dixon who 
delighted a large audience with his 
lecture on "The Tyranny of the Mul- 
titude." 

All of the programs offered were 
■of excellent quality, the Chautauqua 
idea making it possible to secure 
much better talent than is usual in a 
place the size of Annville. 

Lebanon Valley students should 
appreciate the opportunity given 
them to attend such programs of 
high character and should co-operate 
with the town in making Chautau- 
qua in Annville a permanent success. 
— o — 
PROGRAM 



Monday Evening. 
7.30 Concert — The Yodlers. A de- 
lightful evening program. 
8.15 Entertainment — Rosani, the 
Prince of Jugglers. No magic, but 
rare skill. 

KALO HALL. 



Friday Afternoon 

3.00 Series Lecture — Miss Ulrich, 
"The Story Hour." 

3.45 Concert — The Berkeley Sex- 
tette. An orchestra presenting 
also solos, duets, trios, readings 
and recitals. 



Friday Evening. 
7.30 Concert — The Berkeley Sex- 
~" tette. Entirely new program. 
•8.15 Lecture — Mrs. Leonora M. Lake. 
Known as "Mother Lake," the 
champion of the rights of the 
child. 



Saturday Afternoon. 

3.00 Series Lecture — Miss Ulrich, 
"In Merry England." 

3.45 Concert — The A-E-G Company. 
Composed of the greatest flau- 
tiste, a sparkling and brilliant 
reader, and a wonderful soprano. 



Saturday Evening. 
'7.30 Concert — The A-E-G Company 

in a new entertainment. 
8.15 Lecture — Frank Dixon, "A So~ 

cial Survey or Taking Stock of 

Your Town." 



Monday Afternoon. 
3.00 Series Lecture — Miss Ulrich, "In 

Ould Ireland." 
3.45 Concert — The Yodlers. The 

Famous Alpine Yodlers at their 

best. 



Programme Oct. 13th at 7:15. 

Our Football Team. . . .Russell Rupp. 

Essay N. B. Bucher. 

Quartette — ■ 

A. Boltz, J. Morrison, F. D. Beidel, 
M. Morrison. 
Straw Ballot — 

(a) Republican Nomination Ad- 
dress B- Mease. 

Democratic Nomination Ad- 
dress C. H. Loomis. 

Socialistic Nomination Ad- 
dress W, H. Kochel. 

(d) Prohibition Nomination Ad- 

dress C. Longenecker. 

(e) Tbe Presidential Election. 

The Examiner The Editor. 

The Result of the Election. 

Visitors Welcomed. 



(b) 
(c) 



Profs. Marion Hempt and Ray P. 
Campbell chaperoned the following 
young "coeds" and friends at Her- 
shey Park on Saturday afternoon: 

Misses Rachael Dare, Helen Hoov- 
er, Carrie Miller, Neva Nihiser, Flora 
Page. 

Messrs. Amnion Boltz, Paul 
Kreider, Hubert Snoke, Charles 
Leaker. 



Rick!! 38. 

What is it jffives s cold, cures a cold 
and pays the doctor bill? A draft. 

What is the difference between an 
accepted and a rejected lover? Oue 
kisses his misses; the other misses his 
kisses. 

What is the most modest piece of 
jewelry? A watch, because it always 
keops its hands on its face and runs 
down its own works. 



Her Indorsement. 
"I heard that you are to marry Tom- 
my." 

"Yes; he asked me last evening." 

"Let me congratulate you. Tommy 
is all right; he is oue of the nicest fel- 
lows to whom I have ever been engag- 
ed."— Puck. 




Jlshby-i'CLexicoti'i'/j 

AHR.OW 

COLLARS 

1 5 cts. each, 6 lor 90 cts. 
CLU E Tt PEABODVCrCO. inc^^rs. 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. Annville, P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best, 

Jf you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

Ttis Redpatfi-Brockway Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a..d Concert Companies for all occasions 

H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON . : . . : . PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



Root! Root! Root! 

Boost For Lebanon Valley 
Villanova vs L. V. Foot Ball Game Oct. U 

GET YOUR Megaphones, Pennants, Pennant Canes, L. V. Ros- 
ettes for the Ladies, L. V. Neck Ties for Gents, Banners, 
Novelties, etc., etc., at 

The College Book Store 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



\ 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Cursing In Korea. 
A strange way of cursing Is that of 
the Korean. His ordinary swear word 
is "oenuma," or "you brute." But the 
Korean considers himself especially 
abusive when be calls a person his 
child or grandchild. When he wants 
to call somebody down the Korean de- 
mands hotly. "Are you not my child?" 
And the angry retort is: "What! I 
your child? You are my grandchild." 
Then the first goes a step further and 
cries. "You are a grandchild of my 
grandchild:" to which the rejoinder is: 
"You conceited fellow! Have you for- 
gotten that you are a grandchild of a 
grandchild of my grandchild?" When 
their vituperation reaches its climax 
the people of Chosen at last come to 
the point of exclaiming, "You grand- 
child cf a iSos** 



DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 

You are correct If you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & American Lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JAPAN'S FIRST GLASS. 



J0COB SHRBENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



EMERY SHIRTS 

KNOWN AS THE BEST 

THE BEST KNOWN 

Every Emery shirt is designed- 
cut and tailored to the big- best stand, 
ard of perfection. 

Our handsome Spring- Silk and 
Madras Shirts the kind good dress- 
ers like. 

$1.00 to $3.50 

J. S. Bashore 

Clotliier 
Lebanon Penna 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 



Used In Railway Cars, the Natives Put 
Their Heads Through It. 

That observation car would have 
done credit to any railroad in the 
world. A Japanese fellow passenger, 
ru official in the Japanese ministry of 
communications, was amused at our 
expressions of delight. 

"Of course this is all very recent," he 
explained. "Forty-five years ago there 
was not a single car nor a single mile 
of track in the whole of Japan. Why," 
he laughed. "I can remember the first 
Jerky little trains that were run on the 
first line to be opened — the one be- 
tween Tokyo and Yokohama. Glass 
was a new thing to the Japanese, and 
there were a great many windows 
broken and heads bumped during those 
first few weeks. Passengers persisted 
in trying to put out their heads with- 
out first raising the windows. Finally 
the glass smashing became so expen- 
sive and there were so many com- 
plaints over bruised and cut heads 
that the company was ^Jrced to paint 
a white bar on every window to teach 
passengers the nature of glass." 

Which story we could appreciate, for 
we had already noticed in the corner of 
a railroad yard a little old car with 
white bars painted across the win- 
dows. Some of chese cars, our com- 
panions told us, are still used as third 
class conveyances on newly opened 
brunch lints, for there are still parts 
of Japan where the people do not quite 
understand glass.— Christian Herald. 



PACKING A TRUNK. 



Here's the Way to Manage the Job to 
Get the Best Results. 

To pack a trunk first collect every- 
thing that is to be put into it. Fold 
everything as flat as possible. Evening 
dresses and fancy waists may be put 
into thin pasteboard boxes, packed hi 
tissue paper and tied with tapes so 
they won't slip around. These will go 
on the bottom of the trunk. 

Save all the oblong pieces of paper 
that came home from the laundry iu 
the men's shirts and fold the shirt 
waists around these. Use stockings 
and things that will not wrinkle for 
filling in the small spaces that will 
happen, even with the most careful 
packing. Put collars, belts and ribbons 
into small boxes. 

Take folding hangers for dresses and 
coats. Short lengths of ribbon with a 
safety pin at one end and a brass ring 
at the other take up no room at all in 
a trunk and will be useful for hanging 
up skirts. 

If you have no hat trunk and are 
obliged to pack your hats in the tray, 
fill the crowns with tissue paper, place 
them in position and fasten them there 
with wide bands of cotton tape held to 
the side of the trunk with thumb tacks. 

Keep always in mind that the more 
tightly the things are packed in the 
fewer wrinkles you will find at the end 
of the journey, provided that you have 
used care La packing.— New York Sun. 



M. P. MOLLER 

Hagerstown, Maryland. 



Matrimonial Mixup. 
He — Women have no real intelli- 
gence. They show the worst judg- 
ment in the most important matters. 
She— That's perfectly true, but I think 
you ought to be the last person to call 
It to my attention.— Richmond Times- 
Dispatch. 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAj 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 



KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT £ DITSON S WE ATE 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, V'Ne 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St. Bosto 

Dr. Harry Zimmerma 
DENTIST 



W. Main St. 



AnnOille, P 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns for Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. R. UJHISI^EYlWfiri 



Queen St. 



Annville, Pa 



DID YOU SAY 

EATS? 

C. E. WRY'S 



GOT 'EM 



jCebanon Q/alley 
College 

For Young Men and Women 

Five Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Music, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 

Bachelor of Arts, 

Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 

«5rW. S. 0. Sossarj, SPres/den 

jfnnville, ZPa 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



MORRIS CIANDONATO'S 

Electric Shoe Shop 

Shoes repaired by machinery give bet- 
ter results than hand work. 
Shop Work Done While You Wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Prices right 
When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



\ 



COIiliEGE 



Rufus H Lefev. 



4* 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



9 1.6 



s 



Volume VIII. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October, 17, 1916 



Ho. * 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Lebanon Valley Star Course Sophs. Win 

Defeats Vlllanova Seasons Opens Tug^War 



Lebanon Valley won its first foot- 
ball victory of the season Saturday 
at Lebanon when the Vlllanova 
eleven was forced to bow to our col- 
ors. It was an inspiring game for 
the students and supporters of the 
College, and virtually every under- 
graduate of the institution witnessed 
the contest. 

Lebanon Valley kicked off to Villa- 
nova but soon got possession of the 
iball on downs, and then at the be- 
ginning of the game the strength of 
our team began to assert itself. Dan- 
nie Walter twice advanced the ball 
for extensive gains, and runs by oth- 
er backfield men took the pig-skin 
within scoring range. Then Jaeger, 
carrying the ball over on a 20 yard 
dash scored the first touchdown for 
Lebanon Valley. Mackert kicked the 
goal and the students went "wild" 
with joy, for notwithstanding the 
fine showing of the team in the first 
two game s of the year they were in- 
clined to be pessimistic, remember- 
ing the defeat of last year. We did 
not score again the first quarter but 
our men made first downs repeatedly 
and paved the way for another touch- 
down in the following quarter. 

The second quarter was, like the 
first, all Lebanon Valley. The boys 
took the ball steadily up the field 
unmindful of the desperate stand be- 
ing made by Villanova, and Rupp 
plunged through the line for our sec- 
ond touchdown. Thus the first half 
ended 13-0 in our favor, and the play- 
ers with seven first downs to their 
credit. 

During the second half we did no: 
have things entirely our own way, 
for Dan Walter and Jaeger were 
forced to retire from the game on 
account of injuries. Dan had his left 
eye badly cut, and could not see well 
enough to continue playing. Jaeger 
bruised his side, but it i s hoped that 
both players will be in condition to 
take part in the Lehigh game on the 
twenty-first. Keating had to remain 
on the sidelines the entire game be- 
cause of an injured leg, but he will 
be all right at the end of the week. 
Thus, Mackert had to go to the back- 
field, and several shifts were neces- 
sary in the line in this half. Villa- 
nova resumed the aggressive 
throughout the third quarter, but 
could not gain consistently enough to 
seriously threaten our goal. 

During the fourth quarter Villa- 
nova secured their only score. Leba- 
non Valley was penalized half the 
distance to the goal line, and follow- 
ing this our opponents brought the 
ball to our one-yard line but found 
a stone-wall defense before them. We 



The Adelphia Concert Artists will 
open the College Star Course, tomor- 
row evening, with a program select- 
ed from a large repertoire of secular 
and operatic quartettes, trios and 
duos, several song cycles and stand- 
ard oratorios. 




THE ADELPHIA CONCERT ART- 
ISTS. 

The mere mention of the names of 
the individuals composing this com- 
pany will serve as a sufficient intro- 
duction. Mr. David Griffin, Bari- 
tone; Miss Marie Stone, Langstone, 
Contralto; Miss Emily Stokes, Hagan, 
Soprano; Mr. Henry Gurney, Tenor, 
and Mr. William Silvano Thunder, 
Pianist and Accompanist. 

Take an evening off and hear this 
educational and entertaining pro- 
gram. It will be time and money 
well spent. 



It has been said that a man 
known by absorption, meaning that 
we can tell the quality and type of 
any one's life by the things he 
lows to absorb him. 



Is 



al- 



Continued on Page 3 



The life that is sharing in the in- 
terests, the welfare, and the happi- 
ness of others is the one that is con- 
tinually expanding in beauty and in 
power and, therefore, in happiness. 



One of the hardest contested and 
most interesting Tug-of-War contests 
was witnessed on Monday afternoon 
when the Sophs defeated the Fresh- 
men by a 7-2 score. The Sophs got the 
drop "on their greener brothers and 
won the. first three pull in 48 sec, 35 
sec. and 1 Min. and 31 sec, respective- 
ly. The Freshmen then took a brace 
and won the next point after a hard 
pull of 2 Min. and 6 seconds duration. 
This ended the first half. 

In the second half the Sophs again 
took the lead and won four consecu- 
tive points in short order. Here again 
the Freshman showed their ability to 
come back and in 2 Min. and 2 Sec. 
won their second point of the contest. 
Although the affair was a defeat for 
the Freshmen and the Sophs deserve 
all the spoils of the victor, still the 
"Greenies" are to be commended on 
their grit and determination. 



RESERVES 14. PALMYRA 0. 



The Reserve team also won its 
first victory on Saturday at Lebanon, 
defeating Palmyra. A. C, 14-0, in an 
interesting contest. The Scrubs are 
developing a fast eleven, and did not 
meet with serious opposition. Our 
men were outweighed, but were in 
much better shape than their oppo- 
nents, and Lebanon Valley's goal was 
never in danger. Early in the game 
Goodyear scored our first touchdown 
and Peiffer kicked the goal. The sec- 
ond touchdown was scored by Peiffer 
after a spectacular 65 yard run, and 
he again kicked the goal. 

The whole Reserve team showed 
much improvement in working to- 
gether, due to a great extent to the 
fine generalship of Captain Rupp, a 
player who is developing rapidly. 

The line-up: , 



Lebanon Valley 

Ziegler L. E. 

Stahl L. T. 

Potter L. G. 

Kleinfelter C. . 

Looker R. G. 

Ryan R. T. 

Shetter R. E. 

Rupp Q. B. 

Ful ford. . 
Peiffer. . 



Palmyra 

Geyer 

. .Zentmyer 
. . . . Bishop* 
. Bomberger 
... .Ganser 
.... Louser 

Hess. 

Keffer 

L. H. B Slesser 

R. H. B Russell 



Goodyear . 



F. B. 



Keller 



Touchdowns! — Goodyear, Peiffer. 
Goals from touchdowns, — Peiffer, 2. 
Referee — Hollinger. Lebanon Valley. 
Umpire — Ziegler, Lebanon Valley. 
Time of quarters — 10 minutes. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College Jieuxs 

Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-inrChief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
' E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price $1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts - 

Clubs of ten 75 cts - 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



preparation of his or her lesson, time 
enough to become "master of every 
daily situation;" but, at the same 
time, remember that the physical 
side also needs exercise and recrea- 
tion. The social side, too, needs its 
course of development. Poor, and to 
be pitied, indeed, is he who finds no 
pleasure in conversing with his fel- 
lowman, in exchanging vim for vim, 
plan for plan, and custom for custom 
as one excels the other in adequacy. 
At the same time, the student is giv- 
en privilege to hear men who are 
out in actual and vital touch with 
life and its problems, who have for- 
mulated these problems and reduced 
them to principals with laws govern- 
ing their operations, — all, in short, 
that is necessary for the "beginner in 
life" and these he should not fail 
to hear and absorb. 

Now, then, what degree of perfec- 
tion is necessary to be called ef- 
ficient? This depends in a measure 
upon the line of work, but mostly 
upon the standards of the highest 
competitors. As stated, it is no long- 
er sufficient for the electrical en- 
gineer to be merely an electrician, he 
must also be a mathematician and 
shrewd politician and a past accom- 
plice in every affair of high rank 
in his community. In order to ac- 
complish this, only common sense 
teaches us that broad preparation is 
necessary, with also some specializa- 
tion. 



STEADY AND STICK. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 

EFFICIENCY. 

A question of great agitation and 
no less importance in the modern 
day is that efficiency, "What does it 
constitute?" "Where is it found?" 
"What degree of perfection is nec- 
essary to be classed as such?" "What 
steps necessary to acquire it." 

Tii& tus first look into the student 
life and examine the steps necessary 
for efficiency in later life. Here we 
meet two extremes-the one, too much 
concentration and narrowing in 
study; the other, total abstainanco 
of all appearances of educational 
work. The time when it was thought 
that a student should confine his 
work only on one branch of devel- 
opment, should stay at that and do 
nothing else has long ago passed by 
and should almost be covered by its 
-own ruins and debris. The conse- 
quent narrowness of the victim of 
such a life and preparation is evi- 
dent in many of the walks and 
"'walkers" of life. The writer does 
mot mean to be too pessimistic, nor 
yet too optimistic; what he is try- 
ing to strike is the happy medium be- 
tween the two extremes. All of us 
cshould have, a definite plan for our 
life and should aim at it; but, with 
it all, Ave must bear in mind that 
the broader the foundation, the more 
substantial the building; the more 
narrow the base, the greater the 
chances of being overthrown and trod 
upon by a "huskier" opponent and 
competitor in life. Every student 
should put ample time upon the 



A rush is good in its place lad, 
But not at the start, I say, 

For life's a very long race, lad, 
And never was won that way. 

It's the stay that tells — the stay, boy, 
And the heart that never says die; 

A spurt may do, with the goal in 
view, 

But steady's the word, say I; 
Steady's the word that wins, lad, 

Grit and sturdy grain; 
It's sticking to it will carry you 
thru' it, 

Roll up your sleeves again! 

"■<?■* 

Oh! Snap is a very good cur, lad, 

To frighten the tramps I trow, 
But Holdfast sticks like a burr, lad — 

Brave Holdfast never lets go. 
And Clever's a pretty nag, boy, 

But stumbles and shies, they say; 
So steady I count, the safer mount 

To carry you all the way. 

The iron bar will smile, lad, 

At straining muscle and thew, 
But the patient teeth of the file, lad, 

I warrant will gnaw it thru. 
A snap may come to the end, boy, 

And a bout of might and main, 
But Steady and Stick must do the 
trick, — 

Roll up your sleeves again! 

"C. E. San." 



SOCIAL NOTES. 



Miss Larene Engle, '15, has re~ 
turned to her home in Harrisburg 
after visiting her sister, Miss Mar- 
guerite Engle at North Hall. 

Miss Mary Bergdoll was a guest 
at Senior Hall over the week-end. 

Mr. Willis McNelly, '16, has re- 
turned to his school in New Jersey, 
after spending a few days visiting 
his mother. 

Miss Luella Hertzler, '16, attended 
the game in Lebanon on Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Reife and son, 
of New Cumberland, visited Miss 
Ruth Heffelman on Saturday. 

Misses Ruth Huber, Esther Bach- 
man and Pauline Clark were the 
guests of Misses Mary Garver and 
Violet Wolfe at Lebanon over the 
week-end. 

Messrs. Paul Wagner, Harold 
White, E. D. Williams, William 
Keating, Marlin Wenrich and Ed- 
win Ziegler spent Saturday evening 
visiting friends in Lebanon. 

A delegation from the Tau Phi 
Sigma Fraternity of Sunbury were 
here Saturday to see the football 
game and also bring greetings from 
the fraternity to the Sunbury boys 
at Lebanon Valley College. The dele- 
gation was composed of Messrs. Har- 
ry Stahl, Walter Evans, Herman 
Goss, Frank Adams, Charles Still- 
wagon and Norman Stahl. 

Harry Shearer and James Lebo, 
of Chamber Hill, stopped over to see 
Russel Rupp, '17, on Monday. 

The Misses Martha Rose, Martha 
Swartz and Chonlene Fishel, also the 
Messrs. Hershey and Snavely attend- 
ed the game at Lebanon on Saturday. 
In the evening William Swartz, '17, 
returned to Middletown with them in 
their car. 



JUNIOR HIKE. 



CLIONIAN PROGRAMME 



October 20, 1916. 

1. The Value of Clio 

Marguerite Engle 

2. Piano Solo Ruth Zoll 

3. Sketch Helen Bubb, Ruth 

Loser; Francis Durbin, Kath- 
arine Ruth. 

4. Vocal Solo Ethel Strickler 

5. Reading.. Nettie Showers 

6. Olive Branch Editor 



Last Tuesday evening, feeling the 
need of some diversion from too 
hard work and also with a desire to 
maintain the reputation established 
when they were underclassmen, the 
Juniors hiked to a beautiful spot 
near the Mt. Gretna road, several 
miles from town. 

The class, under the chaperonage 
of Profs. Seaman and Seltzer, was 
present almost to a man, and hiking 
conditions were ideal, the moon be- 
ing of the kind that can only be 
mentioned as indescribable. 

After several old-fashioned games 
the girls, (this being their party) 
produced a profusion of good things 
to eat. "Doggies," peaches, pretzels, 
etc. The "doggies" were roasted 
over the fire around which later 
everyone gathered to take part in an 
impromptu program. There were 
songs by Mr. Beidel, a reading by 
Miss Harris, a political debate by 
Messrs. Foltz and Snoke, and vari- 
ous impersonations of important 
characters, the names of whom are 
censored. 

They returned about eleven o'clock 
and after several rousing yells quiet- 
ly sought their abodes, happy in the 
thought of an evening well spent. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY 13. VILLA- 
NOVA 3. 



Continued From Page 1 



took the ball from them on downs 
and Swartz kicked from under the 
shadow of our goal posts, but at this 
point McGuckin, Villanova's star 
kicker, returned the ball with his 
compliments — over the goal posts for 
a field goal, and shortly afterward 
the game was over. 

The final score, 13-3 does not do 
justice to the fine playing of Leba- 
non Valley. We crossed the Villa- 
nova goal line two more times dur- 
ing the first half, but in the one in- 
stance Adams was called out of 
Tiounds, and in the other Loomis was 
off-side when Jaeger took the ball 
-over. Individually and as a team the 
boys played a superb game. Loomis 
was at his best, as were also the two 
ends, Morrison and Adams, and Leba- 
non Valley can well be proud of its 
present football team. 

The line-up: 

Lebanon Valley 

Morrison L. E. 

Loomis L. T. 

De Huff L. G, 



Villanova 
.... Graney 

Coan 

. Dougherty 



Wtenrich C . .Lynch 

Buckwalter. . . R. G Murray 

Mackert R. T Hardigan 

Adams R. E Reap 

Rupp Q. B Diggles 

Jaeger L. H. B. . . .MeGeehan 

Walter R. H. B. ..M. Brennan 

Swartz F. B. . . .W. Brennan 

(Substitutions — Lebanon Valley: 
Goff for Jaeger; Winishe for Wen- 
rich; Swartz for Walter. Villanova: 
Reed for Hardigan; McGucken for 
W„ Brennan. Touchdowns — Jaeger 
and Rupp. Goal from touchdown — 
Mackert. Goal from field — McGuck- 
en. Referee — Ryan, of Michigan. 
Umpire — Godicharles, of Lafayette. 
Head linesman — Houck, of Ursinus. 
Time of quarters — 12 and 10 min- 
utes. 



KALO HALL. 

Programme Oct. 20, 1916 
Our Administration 

Daniel E. Walter 

Vocal Solo George Hallman 

The Reorganization of Russia. . . . 

W. N. Martin 

Debate: Resolved, That the United 

States should pay the sum of 

$25,000,00 to the Republic of 

Columbia to compensate for the 

loss of Panama. 
Affirmative — H. E. Schaeffer, E. Allen 
Negative — L. A. Umberger, A. H. 

Sherk 

Chorus Society 

Sketch.... O. P. Greenawalt, M. L. 

Brown, R. Bilrtner, H. S. Yetter, 

S. Dundore. 



SOPHOMORE HIKE. 

One of the most enjoyable events 
of this year's social activities was the 
Sophomore hike held on Wednesday 
night. About fifty members of the 
Class of '19 chaperoned by Professors 
Edna Seaman and Marion Hempt left 
South Hall for a moonlight party. 
Never did the moon shine more graci- 
ously upon L. V.'s merrymakers as 
it did that night. Everyone know- 
ing that they were released from at 
least one night of study did their 
best to make the evening a jolly 
one. 

When the hikers arrived at the 
heart of the forest of Bachman's 
woods two roaring fires were built 
which added jest and real life to the 
moonlight feed. When the commis- 
sary department arrived and opened 
their packages the regulation Leba- 
non Valley College hiker's rations, 
were distributed among the crowd. 
Never were better frankforts or 
sweeter marshmallows eaten, even if 
some rivalry did exist among the 
Sophs to see who were the best 
cooks. 

The later part of the evening was 
spent most enjoyably in playing 
games around the camp fire. 'And, 
therefore, I hope it will not be 
thought disrespectful if I speak forth 
my sentiments freely and without re- 
serve," and say that the Sophomore 
hike was the best ever. 



PHILO PROGRAM 
(October 20, 1916) 

Installation of Officers 

Current Events Harold Engle 

Oration J. Paul Hummel 

Debate: Resolved, That the right to 
I monopolize inventions by patent 

should be abolished. 
Affirmative — Ralph Sloat, Charles 

Horn 

Negative — C. C. Kratzer, Mark Win- 
ger d 

Monologue Frank Butler 

j Living Thots Editor Shettle 

Visitors welcome 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



Miss Myrtle Daugherty, '16, is 
teaching this year at Fontana. 

Miss Ruth Whisker man, '16, has 
charge of a school at Newmanstown. 

Ira Sankey Ernst, '16, has been 
appointed by the Pennsylvania Con- 
ference of the U. B. church to the 
charge at Biglerville, Pa. 

Miss Josephine Mathias, '16, is 
teaching at Elizabethtown. 

Miss Esther Moyer, '16, is teach- 
ing at Hershey. 

Clayton Zuse, '16, is taking up 
studies at the U. B. Seminary, Day« 
ton, Ohio. 

Miss Mary Bergdoll, '16, was a 
week-end visitor at the school. 

Willis McNelly, '16, spent the 
week-end at the school. 

Joseph Hollinger, '16, spent a few 
hours at L. V. on Sunday. 

Miss Larene Engle, '15, spent sev- 
eral days at the school, visiting her 
sister, Marguerite, '18. 



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Boost For Lebanon Valley 
Villanova vs L. V. Foot Ball Game Oct. 14 

GET YOUR Megaphones, Pennants, Pennant Canes, L. V. Ros- 
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Novelties, etc., etc., at 

The College Book Store 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Tennis Captain Elected 

E. Harold White was elected ten- 
nis captain for this coming year by 
the tennis team. This game has al- 
ways been one of Lebanon Valley's 
weak sports, but efforts will be made 
this coming spring to develop a team 
which will be qualified to cope suc- 
cessfully with such colleges as Dick- 
enson and Gettysburg. There is fine 
tennis material at Lebanon Valley, 
and diligent practice should work 
wonders. Therefore, let's boost this 
sport as Lebanon Valley is learning 
to boost all her activities, and get to- 
gether for a GREATER LEBANON 
VALLEY. 



DR. SAMUEL B. CROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 

You are correct if you get your 

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Y. M. C. A. 

At the regular Sunday afternoon 
meeting the reports of the Y. M. C. A. 
Conference at Eagles Mere were giv- 
en. The meeting was in charge of 
Mr. Wm. Martin. The first report 
was given by Mr. Walter Deibler, 
who gave a general outline of the 
conference, explaining the education- 
al part, the surroundings of the place 
at which the conference was held 
and the amusements provided for 
those in attendance. Mr. Martin 
took up the missionary phase, telling- 
how students from foreign countries 
appeal to America for more workers. 
The speaker also showed the benefit 
the foreign students derive from at- 
tending these conventions in this 
country; they get their true ideas of 
America in this way. The last speak- 
er, Mr. Rufus Lefever, told of the 
many advantage? to be derived from 
attending these conventions. He 
urged the local Y. M. C. A. to send 
as many delegates to the convention 
as they possibly could. It is the aim 
of the organization to send fifteen 
delegates to Eagles' Mere next sum- 
mer. 



VOLUNTARY BIBLE STUDY. 



The Bible Study Committee of the 
Y. M. C. A. has arranged for three 
courses of study for the coming year. 
First year students will take up 
"Student Standards of Action." 
Those students who took this cours$ 
last year will study "A Life at Its 
Best." Seniors and those who have 
completed these former courses will 
study "Social 'Principles of Jesus." 
These classes ...will be divided into 
groups of ten to twelve men and will 
meet some time during the week for 
thirty minutes. All students are 
urged to join one of these classes. 
The good derived will be invaluable. 
If you have not been approached on 
this matter see William Martin for 
further information. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The Y. W. C. A. had an inter- 
esting meeting on Sunday afternoon 
under the leadership of Miss Louisa 
Williams. Miss Frankie Kline favor- 
ed the association with a vocal solo. 
The leader spoke of some of the evils 
existing here at school on our camp- 
us. It is the work of the Y. W. C. 
A. to change these conditions. "The 
Association Monthly" gives a few 
helpful remarks to those who be- 
long to the association: "To be- 
long is to be possessed by the pur- 
pose of an organization, to under- 
stand it, to give yourself to it/ to 
sacrifice for it, to work shoulder to 
shoulder with others in its support, 
to find in it a steadying loyalty for 
every day. To belong to an organi- 
zation is to have it change you, stamp 
its mint mark on you, and through 
you change the world in which you 
live." 



What one lives in his invisible 
thought world he is continually ac- 
tualizing in his visible material 
world. If he would have any condi- 
tions different in the latter he must 
make the necessary change in the 
former. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. 



AnnVille, Pa., Tuesday, Oetobei*, 24, 1916 



Ho. 5 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annvllle, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Lebanon Valley 

Ties Lehigh 



Lebanon Valley held Lehigh to a 
tie score Saturday in a bitterly 
fought contest, each scoring three 
points by the field goal route. It was 
a great victory for our eleven, for 
victory it must be considered, and 
showed that Captain Mackert's team 
is by far the best that ever repre- 
sented Lebanon Valley. "Nixie" 
played a wonderful game, one of the 
best games of his career, but in do- 
ing so injured his knee. However, 
he has the assurance of a physician 
that he will be ab'.e to play the 
Lafayette game next Saturday. 

Lebanon Valley played a great 
game, while Lehigh showed a rever- 
sal of form. The Brown and White 
men fumbled atrociously and gave a 
mighty poor exhibition of forward 
passing. 

Lebanon Valley ends performed 
brilliantly in ground gaining. For 
two periods the ball surged up and 
down the field, neither side getting 
in the danger zones. However, Mack- 
ert, of Lebanon, twice tried a place- 
ment goal from long distance, but 
failed. At the very start of the third 
period Lehigh failed in a great op- 
portunity to score a touchdown. 
Brunner had kicked off to Rupp and 
on the first lineup Lebanon Valley at- 
tempted a forward pass. A Lehigh 
man intercepted the pass and carried 
the ball to the five-yard line. 



Continued on Page 3 

FRIDAY EVENING 

MUSICAL CONCERTS 



A series Qf five extraordinary mu- 
sical events will be given by the most 
distinguished of world-famous art- 
ists, on different Friday evenings 
thru out . the year, at the Orpheum 
Theatre,' Harrisburg, Pa. 

The first of these series will be 
Nov. 3rd, by Mme. Johanna Gadski, 
Prima Donna Soprano, from the Met- 
ropolitan Opera House, New York. 
The present season finds Mme. Gadski 
at the pinnacle toward which she has 
moved steadily and surely since the 
beginning of her public career — the 
acknowledged queen of lyric and dra- 
matic song. 

An obvious consequence of Mme. 
Gadski's ever-increasing popularity 
in opera is the limitation it places 
°n her availability for concert — a 
field in which she is held in even 
higher esteem. 

. The price for the course is $10 
a nd for single concert 75 cents to 
*2.50. For further information see 
p rof. Sheldon. 



Inspiring Address 
By Pres. Bryan of 
Colgate University 

President Bryan, of Colgate Uni- 
versity, visited Lebanon Valley on 
Friday morning and gave to the stu- 
dents a message full of inspiration 
and good advise. He also brought 
greetings from the University which 
he represents. In his talk he spoke 
of the many perils confronting young 
men and women attending institu- 
tions of higher learning, and pointed 
out that they have many perils that 
are characteristic of student life 
alone. Among the many he empha- 
sized four especially. 

First, the student through con- 
tinual "Getting without Giving," is 
too apt to allow himself to get into 
the habit of expecting always to re- 
ceive the blessings of life, and to 
give little if anything in return. 

Next, he showed that the student 
can form the habit of falling into, 
what he pleased to call, "The Lock 
Step." He explained how one may 
follow too closely the daily routine 
of lessons to such extent that they 
lose the broadening effect that col- 
lege life should really give. 

The third peril about which Mr. 
Bryan spoke was the one caused by 
"Segregation." As a student body 
we live in a world that is vastly dif^ 
ferent from the one which we left, 
and also from the one which we will 
enter on leaving school. Four years 
of such segregation, if we are not 
careful, may make us incompetent to 
go out into the world in which we 
will have our life's work to perform. 

Because a student's work is almost 
entirely intellectual, Mr. Bryan saw 
here the fourth peril of college life. 
He advised against disgarding any 
proposition just because we could not 
comprehend it. His illustration on 
this point was especially effective. 
He closed by saying that his con- 
stant prayer was, that we may not 
fall victims to any of these perils. 

We also had present with us on 
Friday morning, Prof. E. M. Bals- 
baugh, '01, now Supervisor of the 
Lebanon Schools; Rev. Daugherty, 
pastor of Trinity U. B. Church, in 
Lebanon; and Mr. Hiram Steinmetz, 
Alumnus and Friend of the College. 



STUDENTS ATTEND INSTITUTE. 

The students of Lebanon Valley 
College had the pleasure of attend- 
ing the Wednesday sessions of the 
Lebanon County Institute last week. 
The speakers of the day were Dr. 
Griggs and Dr. Bryon, President of 
Colgate University. To have heard 
these men speak was a privilege 
which well repaid the students for 
the loss of a day's work in the class- 
room. 



Reserves Win One 
and Lose One 



The Reserves won from the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Y. M. C. A. foot- 
ball team of Bellwood on the college 
field Saturday afternoon, 27 to 0. 
During the first half of the game the 
Scrubs had things all their own way, 
and scored three successive touch- 
downs by Zeigler, Snavely, and Rupp, 
but after Goodyear's touchdown in 
the second half the visitors strength- 
ened considerably and at one time 
nearly scored. 

The contest was fast and interest- 
ing throughout, and marked by bril- 
liant line plunges and end runs. 
Pickens was the best ground gainer 
in the visiting team's backfield; he, 
alone, could make any headway to- 
ward the Scrub goal line. Captain 
Rupp, Snavely, and Goodyear played 
consistently for the Reserves, and al- 
though there were weak spots at 
times, our boys played well enough 
to justly earn their clean-cut victory. 
It might be added that the superb' 
tackling of Kickline was a feature. 

The line-up: 
Rerserves. P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. 

Shetter R. e Garland 

Forsburg R. T E. Oshell 

Looker R. G Hopkins 

Kleinfelter C Dolin 

Potter L. G Sitman 

Fishburn. L. T H. Moffitt 

Wine L. E Wiley 

Rupp Q. B Lytle 

Zeigler R. h. B Pickens 

Goodyear. . . L. H. B Wertz 

Snavely F. B. Loucks 

Touchdowns, for Lebanon Valley, 
Zeigler, Snavely, Rupp, Goodyear. 
Goals from touchdowns, Snavely, 3. 
Substitutions — for L. V. C: Baines 
for Shetter, Kickline for Goodyear, 
Spielman for Fishburn; for p. R. R.: 
Yuston for Wiertz, Brown for Sitman, 
Cherry for Wiley, Burns for Cherry! 
O. Oshell for Sitman. Referee, Hbl- 
Hnger. Head linesman, Foltz. Time- 
keeper, Peiffer. Time of quarters, 12 
minutes. 

— o — 

INDIANS DEFEAT RESERVES. 

The Carlisle Indians sprung a sur- 
prise on the athletic world last Tues- 
day by reappearing on the gridiron 
and decisively defeating the Lebanon 
Valley Reserves 20 to 6. The Re- 
serves made a very creditable show- 
ing when we take into consideration 
that they had for opponents the same 
team which will play our Varsity 
later in the season. 

Carlisle scored six points in the 
first period, seven in the second and 
seven in the third. Rupp scored a 
touchdown for the Reserves in the 
third quarter. The game was quietly 
planned, and few except the enthusi- 



9 16 



Continued on Page 4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price $1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



EDITORIAL. 



One of the numerous activities of 
the Y. M. C. A. in the colleges of 
North America today is the organiz- 
ing of the students of their respec- 
tive institutions into groups of men, 
varying in number, in order to study 
more fully the teachings of the Bible 
and its wonderful characters. This 
plan of Bible study has developed 
to such an extent that a most aston- 
ishing majority of the American col- 
leges have adopted it in some form 
or other. The importance, advan- 
tages and benefits of such a course of 
Bible study are very manifest. In 
the first place, let it be remembered 
that it is a strategic time of a in- 
dividual's life when he is in college. 
Therefore how concerned we ought 
to be in having this life impressed 
with the Ethical and religious truths 
of the Bible. Secondly, a study of 
the Bible in a round table discus- 
sion will allow each individual to 
state his own interpretation of the 
subject under discussion; which of 
curse will be modified by the opin- 
ions and convictions of the other 
members of the group. Thus he will 
be freed from narrowness and bigotry 
in his interpretation of vital moral 
truths. Moreover, a man once stat- 
ing his convictions before a group 
of his fellow students will be more 
liable to carry out his stated prin- 
ciple in his every day life. Thirdly, 
a general discussion by all the men 
will free the group from the dog- 
matism of the teacher. Thus indi- 



viduality in the interpretation of 
moral issues will be developed. 
Fourthly and lastly, many students 
receive such impressions that later 
lead them into accepting Christ as 
their personal Savior. 

This is no new movement. There 
were Bible study groups in this col- 
lege about a decade ago; and, could 
we call the roll of those who par- 
ticipated in this work we would be 
sure to hear some convincing testi- 
monies concerning Bible study. Let 
us help the Y. M. C. A. then in their 
noble efforts to re-establish this bene- 
ficial institution. Other colleges 
have it and some have as their aim 
100 per cent, of the students in Bible 
study. Fellows, should Lebanon 
Valley be content to lead in some 
things and be satisfied to be ancient 
and behind time in other important 
matters? No, we cannot believe 
that you look at such matters in such 
a light and we therefore invite the 
enthusiastic co-operation of all in 
this move forward. 



PUBLIC OPINION. 



The scope of meaning of the 
phrase public opinion is too vast to 
enable a proper definition of the 
phrase to be employed in this short 
space. Public opinion usually is 
aroused through individuals in- 
fluencing other people and also 
through the agency of the public 
press. 

Recently the entire student body 
was stirred to the extreme by a small 
notice that appeared upon one of 
our bulletin boards. This little no- 
tice surely had a ponderous meaning, 
when we consider that the entire 
student body simultaneously express- 
ed itself in an unprecedented man- 
ner. The aroused spirit spread 
through the student body like wild 
fire, instead of following the usual 
course of the public press. The dis- 
cussion of the little notice of four 
lines was upon every student's lips. 
When students have arrived at the 
period of college life they are able 
to realize not only the contradiction 
of such a policy to the democratic 
ideals of free speech, but also the 
harmful influence of such curtail- 
ment as it is proposed to be applied 
here at Lebanon Valley. 

The point of this editorial 4s this: 
That public opinion was here so 
singularly aroused by a small notice, 
that we must look deeper into the 
full meaning of the cause for this 
excited strain under which the stu- 
dent body simultaneously found it- 
self. 

CONTRIBUTED. 



CUONIAN PROGRAM. 

Oct. 27, 1916. 

Parody Merab Gamble 

Vocal Solo .....Mary Lutz 

Can a College department of educa- 
tion become scientific 

Edgil' Geminil 

Piano Solo Frankie Kline 

Reading Helen Shaak 

Chorus stociety 



The first recital class of year was 
held Monday afternoon, Oct. 16, 
1916. The following officers for the 
year were elected: President, Mir- 
iam R. Oyer; Vice President, Irma 
Rhoads; Secretary, Esther Bordner; 
Treasurer Fleeda Kettering; Meni- 
tor, G. M. Greer. 



DEMOCRATS ORGANIZE 



On Tuesday evening the Demo- 
cratic men of College met in Prof. 
Wanner's room for the purpose of 
effecting an organization preliminary 
to becoming affiliated with the Wil- 
son College Club of America. This 
club is a national organization, be- 
ing represented by practically every 
college in the country. 

The attendance was large and 
though no outside speakers were pres- 
ent much enthusiasm was shown, 
nearly every man present expressing 
his loyalty to President Wilson by a 
few remarks. 

It was the decision of the meeting 
to procure all of the campaign lit- 
erature possible and also to secure 
various prominent men to address 
the meetings in the future. 

Officers were elected as follows: 
President, Geo. H. DeHuff; 1st Vice- 
President, Hubert R. Snoke; 2nd 
Vice President, Guyer; Secretary, 
Harry W. Katerman. Let every Wil- 
son man in college become a mem- 
ber of this organization. The only 
requirement for membership being 
loyalty to the man who has so suc- 
cessfully steered the ship of state 
through the troublous waters of the 
past four years. 

The following officers were install- 
ed last Friday night in the Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society: Presi- 
dent, Harold Risser; Vice President, 
Chas. W. Gemmill; Recording Secre- 
tary, Jno. L. Berger; Corresponding 
Secretary, Edgar C. Hastings; Chap- 
lain, Rufus Lefever; Critic, David R. 
Fink; Pianist, John Horn; Janitor, 
Benj. P. Baker; 1st Assistant Jani- 
tor, Frank Butler; 2nd Assistant 
Janitor, Jno. I. Kretzinger. 



RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY. 



Whereas, It has pleased Almighty 
God in his infinite wisdom to call 
from labor to reward, the mother of 
our esteemed brother, Alfred K. 
Mills, we in behalf of the Kalozetean 
Literary Society, offer the following 
resolutions: 

Be it resolved, That we express 
our deepest sympathy to our Broth- 
er and his family in their bereave- 
ment and commend them to the com- 
fort of the Holy Spirit. 

Furthermore be it resolved, That 
a copy of these resolutions be placed 
on the minutes of the Kalozetean 
Literary Society of Lebanon Valley 
College and a copy be published in 
the College News. 

ABRAM M. LONG, 
GEORGE W. HALLMAN, 
RAY Y. GRUBE, 

Committee. 



PERSONALS. 



Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt has re- 
turned to college after visiting at 
her home in New Jersey. 

Miss Ruth Huber was the guest of 
Miss Helen Ziegler over the week- 
end. 

Miss Edith Lehman has returned 
to Lansdale after paying a short vis- 
it to her parents. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



OHy* farultu, tty Htuifente anil tbetr fmnta 
ar* wrMailg \tm\ttb to be nr*aimt at % 
Annual fallmwwt fatty 
to be l|elb bg % JJhUnkoamtatt Utterarg ^nmtw 
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LEBANON VALLEY TIE S LEHIGH 

Continued From Page 1 



Three times bucking attempts fail- 
ed to gain for Lehigh and Cheno- 
weth's forward pass grounded. Wthen 
the ball was .brought out to the 20- 
yard line, Mackert fumbled to Tate, 
again unable to gain, Brunner tried 
a dlrop kick, but failed. 

The fourth period had been in 
progress two minutes when Brunner 
sent the ball between the bars for a 
pretty field goal from the 35-yard 
line. It looked as though the game 
would end in a slim victory for Le- 
high, but about five minutes before 
time was up, Loomis intercepted a 
forward pass on Lehigh's 38-yard 
line. Mackert then dropped back and 
from the 43-yard line sent over a 
beautiful placement goal. A few mo- 
ments later Mackert made a desper- 
ate effort to kick another placement 
goal from the 47-yard line ,but the 
ball was blocked and the game end- 
ed with the ball near the middle of 
the field. 

In all Lehigh tried twenty-five for- 
ward passes, four working. Seven 
times Lehigh fumbled. Ten times 
Lebanon Valley tried the forward 
pass, none succeeding. Outstanding 
was the fine line work of Johnson, 
TJood and Tate, for Lehigh, and Mor- 
son, Goff, Rupp and Mackert for Leb- 
anon Valley. 

Lebanon Valley. Lehigh. 

Morson L. E. .... .McCarty 

Atticks L. T. Tate 

DeHuff L. G McCarthy 

Wjenrick C. .....McDonald 

Mackert R. G Johnson 

Loomis R. T. . .1. Good 

tloff R. EL . .<. . .Richards 

Hupp 1. Q. B iChenoweth 

Jaeger L. H. B Brunner 

Keating. .... R. H. B Pursell 

Wtalter P. B. . . . . .Maggines 

Periods: — 

Lehigh 3—3 

Lebanon Valley 3 — 3 

Field goal — Brunner. Placement 
goal — (Mackert. Substitutes) — Lehigh: 
Quist for Richards, Hurley for Pur- 
sell j wysocks for Maggines; Lebanon 
Valley: Winneskie for Atticks, Ad- 
ams for Rupp, Haines for Jaeger. Ref- 
eree! — Hemeage, Dartmouth. Umpire 
— Ryan, Michigan. Head linesman,-.* 
Fonds, Stevens Institute. Time of 
periods— 12 minutes. 



ADELPHIA CONCERT COMPANY 
RENDERED IINE PROGRAM. 

Last Wednesday evening was ren- 
dered the first and one of the best 
Star Course numbers on the local 
platform. From the start to the fin- 
ish, the quality of music was the very 
best, i. e. quoting authorities who are 
in a position to know, and judging 
from the applause following the ren- 
dition of each number requiring en- 
cores almost invariably. Although 
the majority of the selections were 
already used on the local stage, and 
therefore familiar to almost every- 
one, the masterly rendition caused 
special attention and consequent ap- 
preciation. 

Please do not forget the next num- 
ber which will be a lecture by Hon. 
George Bradford, on Wednesday 
night, Nov. 1. Season tickets are 
still for sale at one dollar each which 
makes the four remaining numbers 
available for less than the aggregate 
sum of single adm is sions. 

Y. M. C~ A. 

The regular meeting of the Y. M. 
C. A. although not largely attended 
was a very interesting one. The 
leader, Mr. Edwin Zeigler, gave a 
very interesting talk on "Service." 
He showed the usefulness of the or- 
ganization along different lines. The 
speaker argued strongly for the 
Bible Study Course which is being 
given this year and urged all to take 
up the course, that it would be most 
helpful to all who took it. The 
Weidler Missionary Fund was given 
considerable discussion, the speaker 
asking all to do everything they can 
for the support of the fund. The 
meeting was a very interesting one, 
but the attendance might have been 
a great deal better. Let us all at- 
tend these meetings, whenever we 
can possibly do so, and we will de- 
rive much good from them. 



MARLEY IVi IN. DEVON 2V$ IN. 



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a specialty 
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Theatrical Costumes 
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ON A RENTAL BASIS 

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Quality Work 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
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If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

Be Redpatn-BrocKway Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 

H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
Eant Main St. ANNVILLE 

THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photograph* of Quality 
LEBANON PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



The College Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops, Seal Jewelry. 
Best Quality of Leather Novelties 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 
The Lucky Curve variety 

D.B. BASHROE 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 



When patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



RESERVES WIN AGAIN. 

Continued from page 1 



astic student body of the Indian 

School, headed by its band, saw the 
contest. Amazing versatility was 
shown by the redskins, who were 
virtually all new men. They were, 
however, unusually light. 

In the third period Haynes, after a 
long run, placed the pigskin within 
striking distance and Rupp scored 
our only points. 

The line-up: 
Carlisle Indians. 



Tib-bits. . . 

White 

Teeteske. . 
Eshelman . 
Wlalker. . . 
Pelinchem . 



Li. E. 
. L, T. 

L. G. 

. C. . . 
. R. G. 

R. T. 



Leb. valley. 

Wine 

Stahl 

Potter 

.Klinefelter 

Koslek 

. . . . . ..Lynn 



Nori R. E Shetter 

Miles Q. B Rupp 

Mays L. H. B Ziegler 

LeRoy R. H. B ...Peffer 

Herman p. B Goodyear 

Touchdowns — Herman, 2; Mays, 
Rupp. Goals from touchdowns — Le- 
Roy, 2. Substitutions — .For Carlisle: 
Washington for White, Frances for 
Flinchem. For Lebanon Valley 
Paynes for Wyine, Isaacs for Kline- 
felter. Forsburg for Koslek, Haines 
fo r Ziegler, Snader for Peffer. Ref- 
eree — Prof. Shadinger, Dickinson. 
Umpire — Pauxtis, Georgetown. Time 
of quarter? — 12, 10, 12, 10 minutes. 

DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 



750 Cumberland St. 



LEBANON 



You are correct If you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 1 
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Cleaning and Pressing Done 
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Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



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Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
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M. P. MOLLER 

Hagerstown, Maryland. 



ALUMNI. 

John Lehman, '11, who has been 
employed in the Chemistry Depart- 
ment of the Semet Solvay Company, 
near Harrisburg, since his gradua- 
tion, has recently been transferred 
to Detroit, where he will work in the 
Cyanide Department of the same 
company. 

On Wednesday evening,. August 23, 
Edna Grace Landis, ex-Conservatory 
student, became the wife of Gideon 
Light Blouch, '15. The beautiful 
ring ceremony, performed by Prof. 
A. E. Shroyer of the Department of 
Greek, culminated another of Leba- 
non Valley's many romances. Mr. 
Blouch met his bride at Lebanon 
Valley several years ago, when both 
were students in the institution. 

Miss Ruth Landis, sister of the 
bride, was bridesmaid, and Edward 
H. Smith, '14, was best man. 

A Lebanon Valley atmosphere pre- 
vailed throughout, for besides the 
contracting parties, best man and of- 
ficiating clergyman, another former 
Lebanon Valley student was present 
in the person of Mrs. C. V. Clipping- 
er, a sister of the bride and a class- 
mate of Prof. Shroyer. Her marriage 
to Mr. C. V. Clippinger, '99, some 
years ago was the result of a col- 
lege romance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blouch will reside in 
Freeport, Illinois, where Mr. Blouch 
will teach. 

The "News" joins the many 
friends of the couple in extending 
congratulations and best wishes. 



KALO PROGRAMME 

Kalo Hall, Oct. 27, 1916. 

Chemistry and Preparedness 

Dale W. Garber 

Extempore 

Improved Farming 

Claude Kleinfelter 

Debate: Resolved, That the matter 
of Tariff Rates and the adjustment 
of them should be exclusively vest- 
ed in a Tariff Commission. 

Affirmative — Ralph Mease, Hobson 
Zerbe. 

Negative — Harvey Geyer, William H. 
Kochel. 

Ocarina Duet. . . . . Goodridge Greer; 

Raymond Nissley. 
Improvements in Photography. . . . 

Henry M. Gingrich 

Examiner ...The Editor 



PHILO PROGRAM. 

Oct. 27, 1916—7:15. 
Where we profited by the European 

War Benj. P. Baker 

Political Outlook. . . .Lester G. Rarig 

Debate: Resolved, That it would 
be unprofitable for the United States 
to purchase the East Indies Islands 
from Denmark. 

Affirmative. Negative. 
Paul 8. Wagner Martin Wenrfch 
Edwin H. Zeigler Win. W. McConel 

Music. . .Philo Orchestra 

Extempore Ray W|ingerd 

Original Story . .Chas. Horn 

Visitors Welcome. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The subject for discussion in Y. W. 
C. A. on Sunday, October 22nd, was, 
"The Immigration Problem of the 
Young Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion," led by Edna M. Weidler. She 
spoke of the rapid growth of immi- 
gration in our country and asked 
us if we realized what our share in 



the problem of immigration really 
is. It was shown that we must mani- 
fest toward these girls the spirit of 
comradeship. We learned what it 
means to the immigrant girl to leave 
her native country and conditions, 
with which she is familiar and how 
she must adjust herself to new con- 
ditions and adapt herself to her en- 
vironment. The Association waa- 
very much pleased with the solo by 
Miss Oyer. 

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When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COMiEGE HEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY CC~ T 

: K,lf ^H Lefever 



Volume VIII. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October, 31, 1916 



9 16 



WO. 6 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Varsity Loses Second Number Annual Phito. 

to Lafayette of Star Course Hallowe'en Party 



Lafayette triumphed over Lebanon 
Valley on the gridiron at Easton Sat- 
urday, 27 to 14. The game started 
well for us. Captain Taylor, of La- 
fayette, fumbled the first punt on the 
20-yard line, and Lebanon Valley re- 
covered. From this vantage point 
Rupp carried the ball over the goal, 
and scored before Lafayette had time 
to collect its senses, but it seems that 
they came to life soon after, for dur- 
ing the rest of the game our oppo- 
nents played better football than 
they have done before this season. 

Two successful forward passes?^ 
both thrown by Weldon and received 
by Taylor and Pardee, respectively, 
gave the impetus for the touchdown 
which tied the score. A few minuates 
later Weldon threw a pass over the 
line to Captain Taylor, and Lafayette 
assumed the lead, which was not re- 
linquished for the rest of the game. 

Lafayette scored twice in the last 
period, one, by Taylor on a line 
plunge, and the other a pass to Ellis 
as he stood right on the goal line be- 
tween the posts. In the last few mo- 
ments of play a long pass, Keating to 
Swartz, gave Keating a chance to 
scq^e our second touchdown of the 
game. 

In fairness to our team it must be 
stated that Captain Mackert was un- 
hardly expect to show our full 
strength, but with a rest of two 
weeks before the next hard game on 
the schedule Lebanon Valley should 
make a fine showing the rest of the 
season. 



Continued on Page 3 

Reserves Win From 

Bucknell Reserves 



The Lebanon Valley College Re- 
serves defeated the Bucknell Univer- 
sity Reserves Saturday on the college 
gridiron, 21 to 0. The game, not- 
withstanding the decisive score, was 
the most interesting that has been 
played here this year. 

As usual, the Reserves started in 
whirl-wind style, and early in the 
first quarter, Snader, by a brilliant 
run, scored a touchdown. During 
the second quarter things went even 
better for Lebanon Valley and trwo 
touchdowns were scored, by Zeigler 
and Haines respectively. Now, in 
quarter number three we should have 
iBcored three touchdowns, and so on, 



Plan your work so that you can 
conscientiously take tomorrow night 
off and hear Chancellor George H. 
Bradford lecture on "Suncrowned 
Manhood." He has a message for 
you. 

Avoid the peril to which Dr. Bryon 
referred as, "The Lock Step." A lec- 
ture is just as essential in your edu- 
cational development as any of the 
special branches of study that may 
be included on your daily schedule. 




Saturday night was 'Philo Night" 
it being the occasion of the annual 
Hallowe'en Party given by the Phil- 
okosmian Literary Society. 

The crowd gathered in Engle Hall 
at 7 p. m. and were led (whither, 
they knew not) by two hobgoblins 
from the lower regions. After many 
devious turns and twists they stop- 
ped at the hall above the Hippo- 
drome theater which was decorated 
with cornfodder, pumpkins and 
pennants. 

Upon entering everyone was given 
a card bearing the name of some 
reptile. In this manner all present 
were divided into groups and after 
the Grand March each one sought 
his or her place in their respective 
groups. 

All of the games of the evening 
-were carried on from this group 
system, representatives from each 
group competing in apple bobbing 
contests, peanut races and other old- 
fashioned Hallowe'en celebrations. 

Each group was represented, how- 
ever, as a whole in one feature of 
the entertainment, namely the re- 
freshments. These consisted of 
pumpkin pies, doughnuts, cider and 
apples, and were heartily enjoyed 

GLEE CLUB STARTS WORK EOR 
SEASON 



CHANCELLOR BRADFORD. 

Mr. Bradford is especially quali- 
fied to lecture to an audience made 
up largely of students because he 
has spent practically his whole life 
studying the problem of education. 
After having spent eighteen years as 
a University Student and University 
Chancellor, he entered the Univer- 
sity of the Universe, where he at- 
tempts to translate Life instead of 
Latin. He says that he would rather 
know men than trees; and while it 
is a great thing to associate twenty- 
five adjectives with the noun in 
Greek, and twenty-five adverbs with 
the verb in Hebrew, it is a bigger 
thing to associate fifty men with 
the task of making a community 
better. 

Again let me request you to come 
out tomorrow night and avail your- 
self of this opportunity of hearing 
Mr. Bradford lecture. 



Continued from Page 4 



We cannot fail if we live always 
in the brave and cheerful attitude 
of mind. He alone fails who gives 
up and lies down. 



Last Wednesday night saw the 
beginning of the rehearsal season of 
the Lebanon Valley College Men's 
Glee Club. The tryouts which were 
held the week before marked the 
discovery of quite a bit of musical 
talent both among those who were 
here other years, but for some rea- 
son had not taken the opportunity 
of coming out to try for the club, 
and those who are here for their 
first year. The tryouts were fairly 
well attended, but for some reason 
there was not as much competition 
for the various positions as there 
was some other years. 

Half of this year's club will ne 
new men, the club having lost 
twelve of last year's men either by 
graduation or because the fellows 
have not returned to school this 
year. 

The club this year will consist or 
same number of men as last 
twenty-four, besides the read- 



the 
year 



er and accompanist. This numbe. 
Continued on Page 2 



f 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieois 

Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price $1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



unpleasant experience of defeat, 
the hands of Lafayette. We mani- 
fested our pleasure over their vic- 
tories, by a celebration that did hon- 
or to the men and credit to our- 
selves. In what manner are we go- 
ing to accept defeat? Are we go- 
ing to sit down and weep and wail 
and bemoan our hard luck because 
things go wrong? This would pos- 
sibly be the easiest and most natur- 
al thing to do, but what would it ac- 
complish? Would it not be better 
to learn the lesson that defeat has 
to teach? A defeat is just as truly a 
necessary element of life as a vic- 
tory, and the team, as well as the in- 
dividual, who can gracefully accept 
reverses, and stand up under their 
weight, is to be commended for hav- 
ing learned one of life's greatest les- 
sons. 

Victory is, in itself, a buoyant and 
propelling force which keeps us 
above water and drives us on to- 
wards future achievements. In its 
absence we must find some other 
force to supply in its place. Wher» 
is the team going to get the neces- 
sary inspiration to make this season 
a success, unless thru the student 
body? Show them, that although 
they did lose last Saturday's game 
they are still your team. 

Five more games remain on the 
schedule. Do you realize to what 



extent the outcome of these games 
depends on you? 

If last Monday's bon fire was the 
extent of your enthusiasm; if you 
spent all your "Pep" in this one 
night of celebration, then it was of 
no more avail than a beautiful soap 
bubble which, when it bursts, is 
nothing. 

Last year for one week and a half 
before the Bucknell game, a banner 
containing "On To Bucknell" was 
displayed in a conspicuous place. 
There was nothing noisy about this 
banner but its phychological effect 
evidenced itself in the results of the 
Thanksgiving game. 

Why not adopt a similar slogan 
now which will include St. Josephs, 
Muhlenburg, Susquehanna, The In- 
dians and Bucknell. Let us get all 
these games. 

Place enough confidence in your 
team to believe that they will. Then 
let your confidence manifest itself in 
some practical way. 

~defeatT~ 



Glee Club Starts Work for the 
Season 



Continued from page L 



I dreamed of a palace I might build, 
Gorgeous beyond compare, 
Whither woes that burden me in my 
days 

Languish and perish there. 
And I told my dream to those of my 
kin 

And they laughed at the dream I 
dreamed; 

And I let them laugh for the joy that 
it bred 

And the childish whim it seemed. 

But toiling and spending my life 

was lived, 
Wayward and small of gain; 
And the palace I dreamed to shelter 

me 

Dimmed as new moons wane. 

Then I, too, laughed at the thing I 

Joseph Leiser. 

MATH ROUND TABLE 

Thursday eve, October 26 the 
Mathematical Round Table had its 
second meeting of the year. As 
usual, the program was very inter- 
esting. The first number, "Nega- 
tive Numbers" by U. U. McCourl 
was so well prepared and rendered 
that Professor Lehman, a life-long 
student of mathematics, declared he 
never knew that there wa s so much 
to negative number. The second 
number, "Resolved that the metric 
system should be established in TT. 
S." was ably discussed by Miss Mil- 
lar. "Declination" by Mr. Haven- 
stock, was interesting as well as 
humorous and instructive. 

The next meeting will be held 
Nov. 21 which all members are 
wreed to attend and to which all 
visitors are welcome. 

CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Program November 3, 1916 

]■ Medley.... Anna Fasnacht 

I' Vocal s °lo Pauline Clark 

3. Life of James Whitcomb. . .Riley 

Elizabeth Fancil 

*' ° horuB Society 
5. Story Written in Letters of My 

R ni , Nam ° Naomi Hand 

J. Ohve Branch Editor 

7 ' Chorus Society 



makes a very good, well-balanced 
club, one that can produce a great 
variety of numbers in their program. 

At the beginning of the school 
year a new Constitution and set of 
By-Laws was formulated. This will 
put the Club on a strictly business 
like basis and will enable better 
management at all times. 

It is the intention of the Club to 
start the concert season soon after 
the holidays. The business manager 
is hard at work arranging the very 
best possible schedule of concerts 
for the boys, giving them an oppor- 
tunity of having some fine trips. 

Prof. Sheldon who is always m 
very successful in directing the Club 
will again have charge, and it Is 
needless to say that the fellows will 
be trained up to the minute. 

The personnel of the Club this 
year is: 

First Tenors: Gregory, Pres.; 
Diebler, Treas.; Ramsey, Sec; Greer; 
Hallman; Jackowick. Second Ten- 
ors: Katerman; Fulford; Herring; 
M. Morrison; Thornton; Haines. 
First Bass: Walters. Vice Pres.; 
7eigler; Price; M. Wingerd; Dur- 
borow; Ehrhart. Second Bas3t 
Keim, Bus. Mgr.; Hilbert: Stum* 
baugh; A. Long; A. Wingerd; Geyer. 
.Accompanist, R. Ported Campbell. 



Y, M. C. A. 

"A Double Life" was the topic 
which proved of much interest, to 
those who attended the Y. M. C. A.. 
Sunday afternoon. Mr. Paul Shan- 
non's presentation of this subject 
was masterful to say the least. His 
concrete examples were each and 
altogether different" £fnd +h °of ^ftj 
among the people outside was he^" 
up to the hearers for inspection. Th* 
inevitable end of such living can be 
readily figured out. Many of the 
bovs pnioyed this meeting but the 
attendance ought to be much bet- 
ter. 



PERSONALS 

Miss Myrtle Bryon, of Clearfield, 
was the guest of Miss Helen Bubb 
over the week-end. 

Miss Ruth Heffelman has return- 
ed to school after a short visit to her 
home in New Cumberland. 

Miss Kathryn Harris is spending 
several days at her home in Harris- 
burg. 

Miss Myrtle Hawthorne visited 
friends in Steelton and Harrisburg 
over the week-end. 

Mr. Myrl Brown has returned to 
school after a short visit to friends 
in Harrisburg. 

Miss Gayle Zeigler returned to her 
home in Carlisle after paying a short 
visit to Miss Grace Snyder. 

Miss Ellen Moyer and Miss Helen 
Bubb motored to Reading on Sunday. 

Mr. Earle Loser spent the week- 
end visiting friends in Annville. 

Mr. Paul -Mater., of .Philadelphia, 
stopped off to see Miss Ruth Croman 
while on his way to Arizona. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



VarsityiLoscs to Lafayette 

There has been much comment up- 
on the playing- of Gummy Wtenrick 
on Saturday. With the possible ex- 
ception of McEwan of the Army, he 
has not met his superior this fall. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



The line-up: 

Lebanon Valley 
Morrison . . , 
Atticks. . . . 
De Huff. . . 
WIenrich. . . 
Buckwalter 



. L. E. 
L. T. 
L. G. 
. C. . 
R. G. 



Loomis R. T. 



Adams. . . . 

Rupp 

Goff 

Keating. . . 
Walter. . . . 



. R. E. . 
. Q. B. . 
L. H. B. 
R. H. B. 
. F. B. . . 



Lafayette 
. . .Thaxter 

Gano 

. . . .Gulick 
. . .Gellatly 

Ernst 

. . .Lehman 
. .Woodruff 
.... Taylor 
. .Diamond 

Elli.3 

. . .Weldon 



Touchdowns — ■ Rupp, Keating, 
Taylor, Ellis, 2. Goals from touch- 
downs — Walter, Keating, Weldon, 2. 
Substitutions: Lafayette — Pardee for 
Thaxter, Bell for Gano, Thaxter for 
Pardee, Gano for Bell, McDonnell for 
Thaxter, Ritter for Gulick, Seeley for 
Weldon. Lebanon Valley — Winn- 
shiek for Loomis, Jaeger for Walter, 
Stahl for Buckwalter, Snavely for 
Goff, T. Rupp for Yeager, Lucre for 
De Huff. Referee— 'Dr. Harvey 
Smith, Bucknell. Umpire — C. E. 
Price, Swarthmore. Linesman — E. 
M. Furry, Lafayette. Time of per- 
iods — 45 minutes. 



PHILO PROGRAM 



Friday evening, Nov. 3rd, at 7:15. 

Resume Harry P. Baker 

Reading David R. Fink 

Debate: Resolved, That the Public 

Press of the United States should 

be censored by the Government. 

Affirmative Negative. 
Raymond Heberling 

Jos. A. Jackowick 
Walter E. Deibler Clyde A. Lynch 
Iprlnk Attinger, Francis Snavely 

and Geo. Haverstock. 

Original Story Hubert Snoke 

Living Thots Editor Shettle 

Visitors Always Welcome 



Mrs. Edgar Landis, nee Dubble, of 
the class of '15, was a visitor at the 
school Friday afternoon. 

J. K. Hollinger, '16, paid a visit to 
the school on Saturday last. 

Mary Bergdoll, is a teacher in 
the schools) of Robesonia, Berks Co. 

Robert E. Hartz, '16, is hilling a 
position in one of the Brooklyn, N. 
Y., Y. M. C. A.'s. 

Addie M. Snyder, '16, is teaching 
in the Annville High School. 

Margaret Myers, '16, is teaching 
in the schools of Altoona. 

George A. Williams, '12, attended 
the Lafayette game at Easton on Sat- 
urday. 



PROGRAM 

Kalo Hall Nov. 3, 1916 

Latest War Movements 

M. L. Brown 
Why 1 Favor Hon. Chas. H. Hughes 
D. F. Beidel 

Quartette — 

George Hallman; Miles Thornton, 

A Long, Paul Hilbert. 
Discussion — 

Ought a Student to pursue profes- 
sional studies while in College? 

Pro. Con - 
W N Martin R- ». Snyder 

Cornet Solo H. M. Ramsey 

'Greece, and the Allies. . .Wm. Isaacs 



By example and not by precept. 
By doing, not by professing. There 
is no contagion equal to the con- 
tagion of life. Whatever > we sow 
that shall we also reap, and each 
thing sown produces of its kind. 

We invite what we fear, the same 
as, by a different attitude of mind, 
we invite and attract the influences 
and conditions we desire. 

— o — 

In the degree that you keep young 
in thought will remain young in 
body. And you will find that your 
body will in turn aid your mind, for 
body helps mind the same as mind 
builds body. 

— o — 

To get up immediately when we 
stumble, face again to the light, and 
travel on without wasting even a mo- 
ment in regret. 

All things are for a purpose, all 
should be used and enjoyed; but all 
should be rightly used that they may 
be fully enjoyed. 

The great law of the drawing pow- 
er of the mind which says t*- 

It was Emerson who said: "Thus 
do all things preach the indifference 
of circumstances. The man is all 

and was he not right? 

To take a cheerful, hopeful, opti- 
mistic, never-down-in-the-mouth, but 
courage-always-up attitude of mind, 
is to set in, and to keep in continual 
operation, subtle, silent forces that 
are working along the lines we are 
going and that open the way for us 
to arrive. 




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LEBANON 



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The things that come into our 
hands come not for the purpose or 
heing possessed, as we say, much less 
for the purpose of heing hoarded. 
We are stewards merely, and as 
stewards we shall he held account- 
able for the way we use whatever is 
entrusted to us. 



T^Oollege Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops Seal Jewelry 
Best Quality of Leather Noveltie, 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 

The Lucky Curve Variety 

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When ***** Adversers Mention That You A* Fron, Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE 



NEWS 



MORRIS GIANDONATO'S 

Electric Shoe Shop 

Shoes repaired by machinery give bet- 
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Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



Reserves Win "From 

Bucknell Reserves 



Continued From Page 1 



but signals were mixed somewhere, 
and the Bucknell team came to life. 
During the entire second half neither 
team could gain consistently enough 
to score again, and the game ended 
with the ball near the middle of the 
field. 

The work of the Reserves was by 
far the best they have done at home 
this year, and especially was the 
work of the new backfield, Costello, 
Haines, Snader, and Zeigler, com- 
mendable. Line-up: 

BUCKNELL RES. LEB. VAL. RES. 

Preble..*..... R. E Shetter 

Reed R. T Lynn 

Lutz R. G Poreburg 

Donelson. ... C KleinfeUer 

Pickarski. ... L. G Potter 

Pindar L. T Koslek 

Gerney L, E Wine 



IV. Main St. 



Anntiille, Pa 



Gerhardt . 
Stover. . . 
Shilling. . 
Herbine. 



. Q. B. 
R. H. B. 
L. H. B. 
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College Proper, Academy, Music, 

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Low rates 

Write for information 
S. 0. Sossar* President 



. .Zeigler 
. .Snader 
. . Haines 
. . Costello 
— 
0—21 
Zeigler, 



Bucknell Res. ... 
Lebanon V. Res. . 7 14 
Touchdowns — Snader 
Haines. Goal from touchdowns — 
Zeigler, 3. Substitutions — .Lebanon 
Valley: Pfeffer for Snader, HUmmel 
for Haines, Spielman for Forsburg, 
Horn for Isaacs, Kickline for Peiffer, 
Haines for Wine. For Bucknell: 
Lew is jor_Stover. Referee — Holling- 

W e can't dwell too continually "in 
the lower stories of our being with- 
out missing the still better thing, 
that are in the stories above. And 
somehow there is in the very cen- 
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something that continually beckon, 
us above. 



It is a part of both wisdom an l 
happmess if we concern ourselves 
more with the life itself, than to 
become so thoroughly absorbed in 
some mere phase or contingent of 
life. 



To grow and to keep in person as 
attractive as possible should be not 
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$1.00 to $3.50 

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Clothier 

Lebanon Penna 



Orpheum Theatre 

HARRISBURG, PA. 
Friday, Nov. 3rd, at 8:15 



Reserved Seats 75c to $2.50 

Lebanon Valley seat sale in charge of 
W. W. McCONEL, Annville, Pa. 

ORDER TICKETS EARLY 

DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. 



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You Are From Lebanon Valley 




COIiliEGE NFWS 

Rufus H Lefevur 9 16 

LEBANON VVLLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, November, 7, 1916 



Ho. 7 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Lebanon Valley Hughes Wins In Eurydice Club 
Swamps St Josephs Straw Ballot Election Begins Work 



In a driving rain, Lebanon Valley 
outclassed St. Joseph's College of 
Philadelphia on Annville Field, 71 
to 0. As had been anticipated, the 
game was no more than practice 
for the Varsity, and the first string 
men were all taken out of the game 
at the end of the first half, with a 
few exceptions. Gummy Wenrick 
has not missed a moment's play since 
he came to Lebanon Valley and he 
refused to be taken from the game. 

Rupp started the scoring early In 
the first quarter with a touchdown 
thru the line, and then Keating 
scored three successive touchdowns, 
one of them r.fter a 60-yard run. 
Immediately afterward Jaeger, after 
a long run, scored, and again Keat- 
ing carried the pigskin over the line 
for his fourth touchdown in the half. 

The second half proved to be a 
repetition of the first ,altho most of 
the regular men had been replaced 
by substitutes. Keating started the 
scoring for th« college with another 
touchdown, and then Coach Guyer 
removed this man from the game for 
the Association could not afford to 
buy him another pair of shoes. 
Adams wa s sent in at halfback and 
he celebrated by scoring, and At- 
ticks thought he ought to share in 
the general prosperity, for he re- 
peated the performance. Haines 
played a fine game, and while in the 
game only a short time, scored two 
touchdowns, one of them after he 
had intercepted a forward pass. 

Lebanon Valley repeatedly tried 
forward passes, but the slippery ball 



Ever since the organization of the 
two Political Clubs at Lebanon Val- 
ley College, the two room- mates, 
"Cotton" DeHuff and "Hal" White 
have been in continual disagree- 
ment as to the sentiment of the stu- 
dent body in regards to the coming 
Presidential Election. To settle this 
dispute and to get some definite idea 
of how matters really stood, the Col- 
lege News Staff held a "Straw Ballot 
Election" on Vriday night. The 
right of suffrage was extended to all 
and a fair percentage of our fair 
Co-ods took part. 

The following are the results: — 
For President — 

T Boys Girls Total 

R: Hughes 45 19 64 

D: Wilson 21 12 33 

P: Hanly 3 1 4 

S: Benson — 1 1 

For Vice Pres. — 

R: Fairbanks T. 43 19 62 

D: Marshall .... 20 12 32 

P: Landrith .... 3 1 * 

S: Kirkpatrick . — 1 1 
Local Assembly — 

R: TTrich 19 11 30 

R : Weimar .... 18 9 27 

D: Early 43 21 64 

D: Bohn 37 18 55 



Continued on Pao-e 2 

CHANCELLOR GEORGE BRAD- 
FORD LECTURES 



One of the strongest lectures ever 
given from the local platform was 
that of "The Destiny of America" 
by Chancellor George H. Bradford. 
From the very beginning to the end 
this orator held his audience spell- 
bound with logic and facts which 
are prevalent in the U. S. today. In 
this man we again have evidenced 
the fact that "riches cannot buy 
knowledge and wisdom"; for as ex- 
plicitly stated in his lecture, he be- 
gan with the humblest station in 
life and with a desire for an edu- 
cation, advanced to his present dis- 
tinguished stage. 

As a speaker, Mr. Bradford was 
clear and forceful. His arguments 
were strong and persuasive, backed 
and developed by logic and person- 
al experience. To hear him, was to 
believe him and wish to hear him 
more. 



RESERVES WIN 

FROM SCHUYLKILL 

The Lebanon Valley Reserves won 
a hardfought game from Schuylkill 
Seminary at Reading Saturday, 13 to 
0. Altho many of the regular men 
were kept at home by Coach Guyer 
in order to give them a tryout 
against, the team played their usual 
sterling game, and the strong Read- 
ing team had to acknowledge defeat 
at their hands. 

Peiffer, Snader and Hummel were 
injured, but all three of them will 
probably be back in the game this 
week. 

Zeigler started the scoring in the 
first quarter by a plunge thru the 
line. The Reserves scored their final 
touchdown in the third quarter when 
Snavely took the pigskin over the 
goal line, after it had been advanc- 
ed to within a few yards of the line 
by Baines. 

Baines played one of his first 
games Saturday, and his work was 
one of the features of the contest. 
The strength of our second team in 
itself prophesies a strong Varsity for 
next fall. Line-up: 

Touchdowns — Zeigler, Snavely. 
Goal from touchdown, Zeigler. Sub- 
stitutes — for Lebanon Valley, Spiel- 
man for Isaacs; Snader for Wine; 
Hummel for Peiffer; Baines for 
Snader. Referee — Posey. 



The Eurydice Club had its first 
business meeting Thursday, Oct. 26, 
1916. The club was reorganized 
with the following officers: Pres. 
Louise Henry; V. Pres., Ethel 
Strickler; Sec, Miriam Lenhart; 
Treas., Marie Richwine; Accompan- 
ist, Miss Bachman; Assistant Ace. 
Miss Mary Haines. 

One of the works of the club, un- 
der Miss Schmidt's direction, will be 
the cantata "Pan" by Paul Bli^s. 
The following are the members of 
the club: Louise Henry, Miriam 
Oyer, Madeleine Harrison, Mrs. Har- 
nich, Ellen Moyer, Mary Lutz, Mir- 
iam Lenhardt, Mrs. Sheldon, Helen 
Bubb, Virginia Smith, Florence Boes- 
hore, Sara Wengert, Dorothy Lorenz, 
Anna Fasnacht, Pauline Clark, Ada 
Beidler, Marie Richwine, Frankie 
Kline, Mary Schoch, Myrle Saylor, 
Luella Batdorf, Hildo Colt, Helen 
Landgraf, Naomi. Rand, Neva Nio- 
hiser, Mary Haines, Ella Mutch, 
Ethel Strickler, Carrie Miller, Kath- 
erine Barto, Miriam Keiper, Sadie 
Houser, Martha Schmidt. 



JOINT SESSION OP THE Y. M. 
AND Y. W. C. A. 



The joint meeting of the two 
Christian Associations held in the 
Assembly room of the Library on 
Sunday afternoon was a very inter- 
esting one, and was attended by a 
goodly number. Mr. 7eigler, pres. 
of the Y. M. C. A. presided very ably 
at the meeting. 

After a rousing song service, fol- 
lowed bv scripture reading and 
prayer, the speaker of the afternoon 
Mas introduced. Miss Hoffman, of 
Lebanon. Field Secretarv of the 
County Sundav School Association, 
gave a very interesting and practi- 
cal address. The speaker discussed 
th^ Sunday school work and ways of 
helping this work. Pennsylvania is 
noted for some thiners. some good 
nnd some not so good. Statistics 
show that thn United States is the 
foremost Sunday school country in 
the world and that Pennsylvania is 
the leading state in this country in 
this work, therefore, Pennsylvania is 
the greatest Sunday School state in 
the world. Lebanon county is in 
the front line of activity which is 
shown by the fact that this county 
has been a Front Line County for 
some years. But there can be im- 
provements. Some time ago, stu- 
dents at Selinsgrove conducted a 
campaign among the Sunday Schools 
of Union County with marked re- 



Continued on Page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieaus 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles f-or publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



Some years back in the History of 
the College News, when the staff had 
a room which they cou'.d cull their 
own. there was attached to the out- 
Side of the door of that room, a box 
in which could be deposited any item 
of news or any contribution of opin- 
ions that the students wished to see 
printed in the college weekly. For 
reasons unknown to the present edi- 
tor ,the use of this box was discon- 
tinued, with the lamentable result 
that the "News" lost much of its one 
time interest. Of course there has 
been a solicitous notice printed at 
'the head of this column week after 
Week, inviting contributions from 
students and Alumnae, but either due 
to the modesty of the student body 
as a whole, or their utter lack of 
interest, this request lhas brought 
meager results. At the same time 
there has been a lot of harsh criti- 
cism and just plain knocking from 
every angle, because the paper haft 
seemingly failed to fulfill the mission 
for which it was founded. 

The College News does not belong 
:to the list of Individuals whose names 
compose the staff. It is your paper. 
To knock it is to knock yourself. 

You cannot help realize and ap- 
preciate the fact, that it is an Im- 
possibility for the limited number on 
the "News" staff, to note and record 
every item of interest that takes 
place at Lebanon Valley College. 
There are daily happenings, of both 
humorous and serious natures, in 
the class room, dining hall, and on 
the campus, that come to the notice 
of only a few, but, if printed in our 



college weekly, would be of inter- 
est to all. Also, the many activities 
of college life causes diversity of 
opinions and often results in help- 
ful discussions in which only a few 
take part, but in which there is a 
general interest. 

Why not use this publication as 
a medium in which to express your 
sentiments on the various activities 
of common interest, to give to all 
the joke or item of news which only 
you and a few others may have origi- 
nally heard. 

For your convenience the College 
News contribution box will again be 
enlisted into active service. For the 
present it will be placed in the Regis- 
trar's office in the Administration 
Building. Please co-operate with the 
staff by placing therein any material 
that you believe to be of common in- 
terest and thus make the College 
News a more representative publica- 
tion of Lebanon Valley College. 



LEBANON VALLEY OVERWHELMS 
ST. JOSEPH 



Continued From Page 1 



made this play out of the question. 

The St. Joseph's College eleven 
was greatly outweighed, and altho 
overwhelmed, put up a game fight 
from start to finish. Weigand was 
the only consistent ground gainer 
for the Philadelphians. Line-up: 
L. V. C. St. Joseph's 

Swartz .... R. E McMenamin 

Loomis R. T Burns 

Buckwalter . . . R W G. . . . Donnelly 

Wenrick C Feron 

Dehuff L. G Diamond 

Atticks L. T Dreuding 

Morrison .... L. E Gallagher 

Rupp Q. B Dougherty 

Keating .... R. H. B Murphy 

Jaeger .... L. H. B Gribbin 

Costello F. B Weigand 

Touchdowns — Rupp, Keating. 5; 
Jaeger, Atticks, Haines, 2; Adam.-s. 
Ooal from touchdowns — Keating, 4; 
Haines. Subs — : Lebanon Valley — 
P. Rupp for Morrison, Winnieshie 
for Wenrick, Wenrick for Buckwal- 
t.er. Lynn for Loomis, Lerew for De- 
"huff. Haines for Jaeger, Adams for 
Keating, Keating for Runp, Horn f >r 
Nt*'"Vc: n-reene-^alt for Horn. Dupev 
for Rutvn. St. Joseph's — H. Weigard 
fr\y Gribhin, Leckie for Dougherty, 
waiters for Donnelly, Jennings for 
Oal lather, Dreuhin for A. Drueding. 
Gallagher for Jennings. Referee — 
Houck. Umnire — Haine. Timekeeper 
— Haine. Time — 15 and 12 minute 
"reriods. 



0Tio_KAL0 JOINT SESSION 

Kalo Hall 

Nov. 10, 1916, 7:15 P. M. 
PROGRAMME 

Piano Solo Florence Bashore 

Visions of The Future Abram Long- 
Modern Inventions Harvey K. Guyer 
Sketch Misses Huber, Williams, Los- 
er. Lutz. Messrs P»oltz. Klein- 
felter, Nissely, Yetter. 
Reading Violet Mark 

Octette Misses Clark, Oyer, Hand, 
Mutch, Messrs Ramsey, Greer 
Keim, Hilbert. 
Cliozetian The Editors 

All Welcome 



Joint Session of the Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. 



Continued from page I 



suits. The leaders of Lebanon coun- 
ty wish to follow this plan and are 
endeavoring to send groups of stu- 
dents from the two colleges of this 
county to visit the diffierent Sunday 
Schools, and at the same time ad- 
vertise the convention to be held in 
Annville, in February. The speaker 
urged all who have not yet pledg- 
ed their aid during this campaign 
to do so, stating that Sunday Schools 
always appreciate visitors and espec- 
ially students. Quite a number of 
our students have already promised 
their assistance, but there may be 
some who have not. 

Help the work along, and let us 
all do our share in this College stu- 
dents' campaign, not only for out 
own welfare and good, but for the 
results which we hope will come 
through our efforts. 



PERSONALS 



A bunch of young people enjoyed 
a pleasant evening in South Hall par- 
lor Saturday evening. Those pres- 
ent were the Misses Helen Bubb, 
Miriam Lenhart, Ellen Moyer, Helen 
Henry, Messrs. Leroy Mackert, 
"Tommy" Foltz, "Jack" Fulford and 
Russel Rupp. 

Misses Luella Batdorf, Ruth Hu- 
ber, Helen Hoover, Neva Nihiser and 
Lottie Batdorf spent the week-end 
with Miss Rachael Dore at her home 
in Harrisburg. On Saturday even- 
ing the party enjoyed a straw-ride 
to Carlisle. 

Miss Ruth Heffelman spent Sunday 
visiting friends in Cleona. 

Mrs. Fred K. Dasher visited her 
daughter, Miss Katherine Dasher, on 
Sunday. 

Miss Luella Hertzler, '16, was in 
Annville on Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Clark and fam- 
ily spent Sunday evening visiting 
their daughter, Miss Pauline Clark. 

Mr. Robert Hartz, '16, spent 
Wednesday at the school, visiting 
friends in the institution. 

Mr. John Long, '16, was the guest 
of his brother, Abram, '17, for sev- 
eral days. 

Mr. Marcel von Bergy, '16, who is 
serving an enlistment in the U. S- 
Army, has been granted a several 
months leave of absence, in order to 
prepare for an officer's examination 
which he is to take in January. He 
stopped over at school during the 
week to see his old friends and to 
see the football squad in action. 

Philo Program Nov. 10th, at 7:15 

Review of the Campaign, Mr. Troup- 

^ssay, Harold Wrightstone. 

Debate: Resolved, That the United 
States should replace the English 
system of weights and measures 
by the Metric system. Affirmative 
Evan C. Brunner, R. O. McLauh- 
lin. Negative, E. D. Williams, 
John L Berger. 

Cornet Solo, Wm. Price. 

Alaska, Clyde Dehoff. 

Bugs, Chas. Horstick. 
Visitors welcome. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



MILES MORRISON 
Laundry of all kinds 
Received dirty 
Returned Snowy White 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Give me a trial. 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 



KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT & DITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, V'Neck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St. Boston 



Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



W. Main St. 



AnnOille, Pa 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

Queen St. flnnville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

EATS? 
C. K. WRY'S 



GOT 'EM 



jCebanon 1/alley 
College 

For Young Men and Women 

Five Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Mu3ic, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 

Bachelor of Arts, 

Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 

&ot>. S. *D. Sossard, XPrest'deni 
jfnnville, !Pa 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 




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COLLARS 



1 5 cts. each, 6 for 90 cts. 

CLUETT. PEAB0DY & CO., INC. MAKERS 

WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Miin St. Aan/ille, P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. 

If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hersliey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

TDe Reopatu-Brockwau Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 



H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 

THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. .:. PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



Madame Alma Gluck, America'3 
unrivaled soprano will appear at the 
Chestnut Street Auditorium, Harris- 
burg, on the evening of Nov. 15th. 
She has appeared in "Boheme," 
"Pagliacca," "Tannhauser" and oth- 
er operas with brilliant success. So 
great is musical charm that the pres- 
ent season will net her over $250,000. 

Margaret Woodrow Wilson, the 
President's daughter, together with 
Melville Wood, the noted American 
Harpist, Mrs. Ross David, pianist and 
Mr. Carmine Farbizio, violinist will 
be at the Orpheum Theatre, Harris- 
burg, Nov. 17. Miss Wilson has a 
beautifully smooth soprano voice and 
does not fail to captivate her audi- 
ence immediately. Admission to the 
Gluck recital $1 to $2 to the Wilson 
recital 50c to $2. Tickets may be 
secured from W. W. McConel. 

DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 

You are ccrrect if you get your 

LADdES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Disccunt. Packard & .American Lady £1 oe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 



The College Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops, Seal Jewelry. 
Best Quality of Leather Novelties 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 
The Lucky Curve Variety 

D. B. BASHORK 

Bell Phone Annville, Pa. 



Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 

When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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Yietopy Ahead 



There is atrtays a Victory 
Ahead for the"LiVe Ones** 

Visit Doutrich's 




mm Fine 

This Week 



Over Four Thousand Overcoats on display at This * k Live Store" 

We're counting on a tremendous volumn to make a small profit 
on this assortment and we're going to get it because they 
are great garments for the money. 

You would have to pay five to ten dollars more for gaiments of 
similar quality elsewhere. 

$15 $18 $20 $25 



Overcoats Overcoats 



Overcoats 



Overcoats 



DOUTRICHS 



304 Market St 



Hamsburg, Pa, 



COIiliEGE flEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY C< * l 6 



Volume VIJI. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, November 14, 1916 



Ho. 8 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Lebanon Valley 6j CHcvKalo First Election Day 

Muhlenburg Joint Session Foot Ball 



Lebanon Valley triumphed again 
on the gridiron Saturday at Allen- 
town when the Varsity defeated 
Muhlenberg 6 to in a game which 
was creditable to both elevens. There 
was scoring but once, in the second 
period, when Dannie Walter by an 
off-tackle play wriggled thru the 
Muhlenberg line, and by a 45-yard 
run scored the only touchdown of 
the game. Dannie played his best 
all thru the game, many times 
breaking thru the opposing line for 
good gains, and it was only after he 
had dodged several Red and Gray 
players that he carried the pigskin 
over the goal line. 

Lebanon Valley time and again 
tackled brilliantly, intercepted for- 
ward passes and stopped all attempts 
to buck their line, but in spite of 
that, most of the game was played in 
our territory. Muhlenberg missed a 
chance to win by failing to try for 
field and placement Koajp . which 
three or four times seemed easily pos- 
sible. They probably thought that 
they could break down the strong 
defense pitted against them, but only 
once were we threatened seriously. 
Early in the game Muhlenberg seem- 
ed to suddenly come to life, and start- 
ed from the middle of the field to 
make a great drive for a touchdown. 
In a short time they had made three 
successive first downs with apparent 
ease, but then at a critical moment 
we regained the ball and kicked out 
of danger. 

Both teams put up a stubborn, 
stonewall defense throughout the en- 
tire contest, and this was the cause 
of much punting. However, Leba- 
non Valley was not put to any dis- 
advantage because of this, for Keat- 
ing more than held his own with his 
opponent in this department. Keat- 
ing does not try solely for distance 
in punting, but kicks high, accurate 
spirals, which give the men plenty 
of time to run down under them and 
make the tackle before the ball can 
be advanced. 

Captain Mackert was again in the 
line, and altho he did not extend 
himself, his efforts in backing up the 
line proved time after time a stum- 
bling block in the way of the Muh- 
lenberg backfield. Just once he play- 
ed fullback on the offense, and after 
two vain attempts to gain, made his 
first down on the third try. Mack- 
ert did wisely in not exerting him- 
self needlessly, and he should be in 
perfect condition for the remaining 
games. 

Goff is practically the only injured 
man as a result of the contest, and 



Twice a year the Clios are invited 
to visit Kalo Hall when a program 
is given by various members of both 
societies and the session on Friday 
evening proved to be a very enjoy- 
able one. The program showed un- 
usual preparation on the part of all 
participants. Several musical num- 
bers, papers on literary subjects and 
a sketch provided an evening not 
soon to be forgotten. Mr. Abram 
Long's "Vision of the Future" was 
developed in a most unique way and 
delivered in a most convincing man- 
ner. It had its clever side as well 
as its sensible side. I wonder how 
many of us could make class distinc- 
tion? The hot lunch which was 
the last event of the evening proved 
that Kalos were good hosts in that 
they forgot nothing. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Recognition Seivice for new 
members was held on Sunday after- 
noon, under the leadership of Miss 
Katherine Dasher. The new girl3 
were received into the association by 
the president Miss Ruth Heffelman. 
Association music was sung, and a 
duet by Misses Lorenz and Colt waa 
very much enjoyed by the associa- 
tion. 



VARSITY SUBS ALTOONA IN- 
DIANS 7 

A Lebanon Valley team, composed 
of Varsity substitutes and Reserves 
were defeated by the P. R. R. Y. M. 
C. -A. eleven of Altoona on election 
day 7 to 0. The opponents, popu- 
larly known as the Altoona Indians, 
are one of the strongest elevens in 
the state and • the showing of the 
Lebanon Valley representatives was 
gratifying. Our eleven was streng- 
thened by the presence of Chief 
Wheelock in the backfield, and the 
game was nearly over before the 
touchdown was scored. The contest 
wats played before a crowd of four 
thousand, and there were many ex- 
citing moments during the after- 
noon. 



SCRUBS 28 LYKENS 

!► A Scrub team, composed of play- 
ers who did not accompany the Var- 
sity substitutes to Altoona defeated 
the Lykens football team on election 
day 28 to 0. The Lebanon Valley 
team easily outweighed their oppo- 
nents, and could have made the score 
more decisive had it been necessary. 



Continued on Page 4 



FOOTBALL 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Vs. 

CARLISLE INDIANS 

SATURDAY, NOV. 18 

at 2:30 p. m. 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC FIELD 



Continued on Page 3 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



Several weeks ago in announcing 
the St. Joseph's game, one of the 
Philadelphia newspapers designated 
Lebanon Valley as a "big" college. 
To be sure the term big in this 
case referred particularly to our 
football team, and rightfully, too, 
but has it ever occured to you what 
that football team has been compell- 
ed to do in order that it should be 

.<sa called? Did you ever notice that 
it is out every night, continually 
working and striving toward perfec- 
tion and that it is only by this 
means that it has required bigness. 
IThere is no better slogan for in- 

• dividuals or organizations than "Be 

r Big," but, of course, one must have 
the correct iJntterjvretation of bigness 

t before lire will be benefited. 
> The ways for an individual to be 
big are many and varied and neces- 
sarily have no relations to physical 
stature since size is only relatively 
important according to the character 
<of a man. To be always truthful al- 
ways careful in your speech of oth- 
ers and also in your action toward 
them; to be fair in everything and 
with everybody are a few of the 
more simple methods of being big. 

To maul a fellow when no one 
is looking is as easy in everyday life 
as it is in a football scrimmage but 
who can derive any benefit thereby? 
tt is easy enough, though not always 
done, to engage in cheerful and en- 
couraging rooting for the home team 
but it seems equally easy to engage 
in uncomplimentary rooting for the 
visiting team, one of the littlest ac- 



tions of which college students are 
capable and one which would never 
be repeated if the rooters could once 
exchange places with the visitors. 

Be big by being careful in your 
choice of companions. By that do 
not understand that you are to be 
suspicious of everybody, but remem- 
ber a man is judged by the company 
he keeps and be sure you will be 
benefited by a company before mak- 
ing yourself one of it. 

Finally be fair to yourself, do the 
work given to you. Work half done 
is a joke on yourself and work dis- 
honestly done is much better undone. 

These are only a few of the more 
simple methods by which a college 
student may acquire individual fig- 
ures and consequent bigness for his 
school But beware of that super- 
ficial bigness which makes a man 
do things merely because he wishes 
people to see him perform. Such a 
man is an object for universal pity 
and universally it should be given 
hin'. 

Do not live within yourself, for 
yourself but try to cultivate the spir- 
it of "Being a Friend to Man." 



ASSISTANCE OR DEATH 



For the past year various efforts 
have been made to organize and 
maintain a college band; but up to 
the present time the efforts hav? 
been very unsatisfactory due to thp 
lack of financial support on the part 
of the student body. The question 
resolves itself into this; must the 
band disorganize and sell its instru- 
ments in order to meet its financial 
oblibations? This must surely be 
done, if assistance is not given im- 
mediately. 

Each member has already "cough- 
ed up" and in addition has been giv- 
ing his time each week for rehear- 
sals. Is it fair that the members be 
compelled to give both time and 
money when it is so little appreciat- 
ed by the students? If financial aid 
is not forthcoming the band must 
dissolve; and YOU alone will be re- 
sponsible for the dissolution. 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Miss Marguerite Engle has return- 
ed to school, after paying a short 
visit to her home in Harrisburg. 

Miss Esther Bordner spent Sun- 
day in Lebanon. 

Miss Ruth Heffelman visited her 
parents in New Cumberland over 
the week-end. 

Miss Helen Subers was a guest In 
Harrisburg on Saturday. 

Misses Ruth Loser, Mary Haines. 
Ruth Hughes. Helen Bubb, Miriam 
Lenhart and Ethel Rupp were 
among the students who witnessed 
the Lebanon Valley-Muhlenberg 
game on Saturday. 

Miss Edna A. Seaman spent the 
week-end at her home in Allentown. 

Miss Miriam Keyser visited friends 
in Lebanon on Sunday. 

Mr. Francis Snavely has returned 
to school after sDending a few day* 
at his home in Ramey. 

Miss Helen Heiney was the guest 
of Miss Ellen Meyer at her home in 
West Hanover. 



SCRUBS LOSE TO PALMYRA 



Saturday afternoon the forces of 
the Scrubs, greatly weakened by the 
inroads on their number for the 
Muhlenberg trip, journeyed to Pal- 
myra where they were unfortunate- 
ly defeated by a score of 19-0. 

The Palmyra team has greatly 
strengthened itself since their de- 
feat by the Scrubs at the beginning 
of the season, which coupled with 
the fact that they greatly outweigh- 
ed our boylfe easily explains the re- 
sult. 

A loyal crowd of rooters followed 
the Reserves, some hiking and others 
going by trolley. 

Wine *...L. E Young 

Stahl L. T Slesser 

Potter L. G Ganser 

Kleinfelter C Bishop 

Horn R. G Poorman 

Forsburg R. T Louser 

Baynes R. E Hesa 

Zeigler Q. B Keefer 

Hummel L. H. B ..Shaub 

Fishburn. . . .R. H. B Kreider 

Rea F. B Keeler 

Substitutions: Dupes for Baynes; 
Snader for Rea; Baynes for Snader; 
Isaacs for Hain; Spielman for Isaacs; 
Hartman for Dupes. Touchdowns — 
Shaub, Keefer, Shaub. Goals from 
touchdown — Shaub. Referee — Zent- 
myer, Palmyra. Umpire — Murphy, 
Lebanon Valley. Head linesman — 
Bomberger, Palmyra. 



THE ALUMNUS RETURNS 



Same old college, 

Tho' different boys; 
Same old tricks, and 

Same old noise; 
f " Same old greetings, 

Same old smiles, 
Bringing back the 

Same old whiles. 

Same old stories, 

Same old cheer; 
Tho' not the girls, 
* We met here; 

Same old jingles, 

Same old jokes; 
Using still the, 

Classic hoax. 

Same old faith, 

In old L. V.; 
~ "Truest praise we 

Give to thee." 
Same old ioys and, 

Same old fun; 
Sa^ne old sighs when 

Study's done. 

Samo old class "pep," 

Still we hear; 
Sa^fi old school yells, 

Thrill the air; 
Sarne old struggles. 

Gasps of "oh:" 
'Twppti the "F^^shie," 

And "Sopho." 

Sa 1 "^ olH college, 

Samo L. v., 
Juf*t like college 

n-=(>d to be: 
Sar^e old sones. 

Ann* nil the rest, 

Al ,v1 f>. Mntpr, 

Still the best. 

"C. E. San" 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Nnuemter tutentg-fmtrtlt 
nineteen bwioren anb Btxtee n 
at etnbt n'rlnrk 
iEngle (taaeruatflrg 



PHILO PROGRAM 

Friday evening, Nov. 17, at 7.15 

Happenings at other Colleges. . . . 

Russell Ehrhart 

My Autobiography. .Marlin Wenrich 
Debate: Resolved, That the Ports 

of the United States Should be 

Closed to Submarines of all Be\-i 

ligerent Nations. 

Affirmative Negative 
Rufus R. Ness J. Paul Hummel 
Geo. A. DeHuff J. D. Rutherford 

Piano Solo Walter E. Deibler 

Sketch • 

Harold Engle 
Isaac Boughter 
Ray Wingerd 
Calvin Fencil 

Living Thots Editor Shettle 

PROGRAMME 



Kalo Hall, Nov. 17, 1916 

What Happened? . .Charles Hartman 
Contemporary Ideals in Education 

Ammon 'Boltz 

Extempore Quartette 

Parliamentary Drill . .Leaders, Ralph 

Mease and Claude Kleinfelter 

Chorus Society 

Impressions Miles Thornton 

Visitors always welcome 

KALOS ELECT OFFICERS 

At a recent business meeting of 
the Kalozetean Literary Society the 
folowing officers were elected for 
the winter term: Pres., George Hall- 
man; Vice Pres., Chas. Loomis; 
Critic, R. W. Williams; Rec. Sec, 
Paul Hilbert; Cor. Sec, Miles Mor- 
rison; Chap., Homer Ramsey; Editor 
Examiner, Douglas Beidle; Pianist, 
Leroy Walters; Ser. at Arms, Robert 
Burtner; Assistant Ser. at Arms. 
Zerby. President for the spring 
term, A. Long. 

Hallman (In Bible 3) — Prof., how 
do you snell disease. 

Prof. Shroyer — D-e-c-e-a-s-e. 

We are all glad to see Prof Derick- 
son back in our midst again. 

Have you bfgun your group Bible 
study yet? If not. get lined up. 

The question for each man to set- 
tle is not what he would do if he 
had the means, time, influence and 
pfi"oational advantages, but what he 
will do with the things he has. 

Keep your courage up, and con- 
versely, it will keep you up. 



LEBANON VALLEY, 6; 

MUHLENBERG, 



Continued From Page 1 



his bruised knee will be all r'fght 
again in a week. Russ Rupp re- 
ceived some hard knocks, but he con- 
tinued in the game and did not sur- 
fer any after effects. 

Many of the students attended the 
game and were well rewarded for 
their trip to Allentown. Line-up: 

Lebanon Valley Muhlenberg 

Morrison Left end .... McGovern 

Atticks Left tackle Dudack 

DeHuff Left guard. . . . DeLozier 

Wenrick Centre Schwenk 

Loomis Right guard Gaston 

Mackert. . . . Right tackle . . . .Cabellus 

Adams Right end Wilson 

Rupp Quarterback . .Fitzgerald 

Goff Right halfback. .. .Fallon 

Keating. . .Left halfback. . ..Stevens 

Walter Fullback Caskey 

Lebanon Valley 6 — 6 

Muhlenberg — 

Substitutions: Lebanon Valley — 
Jaeger for Goff; Winishie for Wen- 
rick; Wenrick for Mackert; Mackert 
for Walter. Muhlenberg — Herron 
for Stevens; Stevens for Herron; 
Deveraux for Cabellus; McGovern 
for Stevens; Creighton for McGov- 
ern. Touchdown — Walter. Referee 
— Eckels, Washington and Jefferson. 
Umpire — Washburn, Brown. Head 
linesman — Houck, Ursinus. 



Better the chance of a shipwreck 
on a voyage of high purpose than 
to expend life in- paddling hither 
and thither on a shallow stream to 
no purpose at all. 

To speak wisely may not always 
be easy, but not to speak ill requires 
only silence. 




Jlshby^Lexicon'fy 1 

COLLARS 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. • Annville, P 



Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. „ 

Jf you examine our shirt, collar and cult 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

TUB Reflpatn-BrocKwau Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 



H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



The College Book Store 

Headquarters For Students Supplies 

Pennants, Banners, Cushion Tops, Seal Jewelry- 
Best Quality of Leather Novelties 
See Our Window Display 

Parker Self Filler Fountain Pens 
The Lucky Curve Variety 

B A S H O R E 



D . B 



Bell Phone 



Annville, Pa. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



MILES MORRISON 
Laundry of all kinds 
Received dirty 
Returned Snowy White 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Give me a trial. 



BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 



KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT & DITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, V'Neck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St. Boston 



Dr. Marry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



Y, M. C. A. 



W. Main St. 



AnnOilte, Pa 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 



Queen St. 



flnnville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

EATS? 

C. JEC. WRY'S 



GOT 'Eil 



jCebanon I/alley 
College 

For Young Men and Women 

Five Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Mu3ic, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 
Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor f Music. ' 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 
&ev. S. <D. Sossartt, President 
jfnnviiie, ZPa 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



An unusually large number at- 
tended the Y. M. C. A. meeting last 
Sunday afternoon when Mr. Paul 
Shettel discussed in a brief and con- 
cise manner, "The Way Down and 
the Way Up." Mr. Shettel's pre- 
sentation of the facts which lead to 
Peter's betrayal of Christ and his 
restoration was masterful. His talk 
was inspiring thruout, and many 
were influenced to speak of their ex- 
periences in relation to this subject. 
Some of the points brought out in 
the discussion were. Peter followed 
afar off; it is dangerous to As- 
sociate Willi Wicked Companions, 
and Peter rose thru sincere repen- 
tance. 



Ozar Thrown By Turner 

%ck Ozar lost his bout for the 
Middleweight Championship of the 
World in Wrestling, when Joe Turn- 
er obtained an arm hold after one 
hour and forty-seven minutes. The 
match was held in the Academy :>f 
Music in Lebanon, before a packed 
house, and was largely attended by 
the male students of Lebanon Valley. 

Joe Turner, the present champion, 
was in the best of condition, and 
it was well for his title that he 
was, for Jack took the aggressive 
early in the bout, and it looked 
many times a sif he had a chance 
for victory. However, Turner wrig- 
gled and twisted out of every dan- 
gerous hold, and finally by a Japan- 
ese hold, put Jack into a position 
where h e had to give his opponent 
a fall or have his arm fractured. 

The mt5n were about evenly 
matched in weight and skill, and 
there was not a d"ll moment in the 
mtire evening. The match was to 
be two falls out of three, but Ozar 
withdrew rather than take anv 
chances with a wrenched arm. He 
feels that he may be more successful 
i" another trv for the champion- 
ship, anrl he certainlv earned anoth- 
er opportunity to oDnose Joe Turner. 



Scrubs 28; Lykens 



Continued from page I 



Keating one of the Scrubs (?). 
scored one of the touchdowns. He 
accompanied the team and had to 
have a few minutes workout to keep 
in shape. Altho the Scrubs went in- 
to the game with a lineup which 
they had never used before they 
played a fine game in every depart- 
ment. 



Two bio- events will take ula^e in 
KamsHnw^s musical life this Week- 
Alma GlnnV will be at the Chestnut 
Street Auditorium on Wednesrlav 
evening;. Margaret W^odrow Wil- 
son accompanied bv Melville Clark 
on the harp. Mrs. Ross David on the 
piano and Signor Tarbizio on the 
violin, will be the attraction at the 
Orpheum on Friday evening. Tick- 
ets for either event may be secured 
from W. W. M'CONEL. ' 



Faith is an invisible and invincible 
magnet, and attracts to itself what- 
ever it fervently desires and calmly 
and persistently expects. 

— o 

We need more gentleness and sym- 
pathy and compassion in our com- 
mon human life. Then we will 
neither blame nor condemn. Many 
times the struggles are greater than 
we can ever know. 

We are living the eternal life now 
as much as we ever will or ever 
can live it. The only Heaven we 
will ever have is the one we realise, 
make and carry with us. We deter- 
mine always our own condition — 
Heaven or Hell — here and here- 
after. 

- — o — > 

If our heart goes out in love to 
all with whom we come in contact, 
we inspire love and the same en- 
nobling and warming influences of- 
love always return to us from those 
in whom we inspire them. 

— o — 

Whatever channel the mind sets 
itself in the life will follow for it 
is invariably true that the life al- 
ways follows the thought. 

— — 

This is the law of prosperity. When 
apparent adversity comes, be not cast 
down by it, but make the best of 
it, and always look forward for bet- 
ter things, for conditions more pros- 
perous. 

DR. SAMUEL B.^CRCH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building r ' 



750 Cumberland St. 



LEBANON 



You are correct If you get your 

LADiES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 



AT 



KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discci nt, Packard 8 /n.crican Ijc'y 51 ct 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COIiliEGE JS.EWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume VIII. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, flovembet*, 21, 1916 No. 9 

Enterfd as second-cli si matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Varsity Defeats 

Indians 33^0 

Lebanon Valley won its third con- 
secutive victory Saturday on the 
College field when the Carlisle In- 
dians were defeated, 33 to 0. The 
game was interesting, and marked 
by sensational plays which thrilled 
the spectators. 

At the outset of the contest 
neither rude could gain appreciably, 
and the Indians not only held Leba- 
non Valley scoreless the first quarter 
but kept the pigskin in L. V. terri- 
tory most of the time. Only one ex- 
tensive gain was made by our team 
during this period. Haines, a new 
back, made a fine 30 yard gain and 
came near going for a touchdown. 

In the second half, however, Leb- 
anon Valley came to life in such a 
manner that the Indians were d'azed 
by our varied attack. Mackert was 
substituted in the backfield, and 
soon after crossed the goal line for 
the first s-core of the afternoon. At- 
ticks then took a long forward pass 
from Goff, and after a £ 0-yard run 
scored the second touchdown. Keat- 
ing kicked both goals and the score 
stood 14 to 0, but the boys were 
not satisfied with that and before 
the period and half were over Goff 
had taken the pigskin over for a 
third touchdown on a plunge thru 
the line. 

The Indians came back for the 
second half with renewed energy, 
and altho Haines made a 25-yard 
run, Lebanon Valley was again held 
scoreless. But "Hinkey" had car- 
ried the ball close to the Indian 
goal posts, and very soon after the 
fourth quarter began Goff scored his 
second touchdown of the day. 

At this moment of the game Leb- 
anon Valley changed its tactics and 
resorted to nothing but forward 
passes. Some were successful and 
some were not, but with only two 
minutes to play "Bill" Swartz 
caught a long aerial pass from Keat- 
ing over the goal line for the last 
touchdown of the game. 



Continued From Page 4 



A CHRISTMAS BAZAAR 



The Y. W. C. A. is planning to 
Rive you a good time at its Annual 
Christmas Bazaar in the Gym Satur- 
day afternoon and evening, Dec. 16, 
1916. There everything will be as 
in Fairyland. Even Mrs. Wiggs of 
the Cabbage Patch will be present. 
The Domestic Science and Art De- 
partments will be well represented. 

Rumor says that even gypsies and 
magicians will be there to entertain. 

Save your pennies, for Y. W. Js 
counting on you. 



Girls Begin 
To Practise 

Basket Ball 

Under the direction of Coach Guy- 
er, the Girls' Basketball Team has 
started weekly practice in order to 
prepare for the coming season. 
There are four members at College 
who were on last year's quintet, 
Miss Engle, Miss Bubb, Miss Bach- 
man and Miss Gamble, and this sea- 
son's team will thus have a promis- 
ing nucleus . around which to 
build a successful five. Be- 
sides these old members how- 
ever, there is much new material 
for every position. Among the num- 
ber who are trying for the team, 
Miss Rupp looks the most promising, 
and she will make a strong bid for 
a varsity position. 

The scnedule, while not complete, 
contains some hard games, but from 
present indications Lebanon Valley 
will be well represented this winter 
in this branch of sport. 



RALLY DAY 



Rally Day was observed last Sun- 
day in the United Brethren Sunday 
School with an excellent program. 
Rev. Daugherty had extended an in- 
vitation to the students to be pres- 
ent and many responded. The prin- 
cipal address of the morning service 
was made by W. G. Clippinger, presi- 
dent of Otterbein College, and of the 
Ohio State Sunday School Associa- 
tion. He spoke on" The Three-fold 
Problem of Religious Education, 
which was a message of vital im- 
portance to us as students of a Chris- 
tian Institution. 



Dr, Clippinger 

Speaks in Chapel 

We were fortunate in having with 
us Dr. W. G. Clippinger, who brought 
us such a helpful message yesterday 
morning in chapel. He spoke from 
a wide experience both as a student 
and administrator and his sugges- 
tions were of vital interest. 

He placed special emphasis on the 
necessity of the student measuring 
his time, correlating his activities, 
and relating them according to their 
importance. The fact that the stu- 
dent's life is a busy one led Mr. 
Clippinger to suggest that they peti- 
tion for an eight hour law. The cur- 
riculum, recreation and business 
phases of college life were pointed 
out as filling a large place in our 
daily programs, but he made an ap- 
peal that we do not follow these ac- 
tivities so closely that we neg- 
lect the better things of life. We 
dare not, if we wish to become well 
balanced young men and women, 
neglect the highest moral and spir- 
itual development which college life 
has to offer. 

As president of The Otterbein Uni- 
versity, he brought greetings from 
the faculty and student body of that 
institution to the Faculty and stu- 
dent body of Lebanon Valley College. 
These greetings were returned by a 
rising voice of those present at 
chapel. 

In closing, Dr. Clippinger con- 
gratulated us on being college stu- 
dents at this age of reconstruction, 
of the industrial, the social and re- 
ligious orders. 

Reserves Win From 
Indian Reserves 



Another feature of the morning 
program was the music rendered by 
a large choir and a vocal solo by 
Miss Gertrude Schmidt. 

Mr. C. M. Coover, superintendent, 
gave a short address of welcome fol- 
lowed by a few remarks by Mr. S. 
B. Graybill. Mr. Edwin Zeigler then 
read the Scripture lesson and Pro- 
fessor Shroyer gave a brief outline 
of Paul's journey from Melita to 
Rome. The children's processional 
which came next on the program was 
quite interesting as well as the next 
number, a song by Mrs. H. E. Mil- 
lard's Clear Spring Mission Sunday 
School. 

The attendance was not as large 
as had been expected but the response 
for pledges for the coming year was 
good. 

Dr. Clippinger was also present at 
the evening service and preached a 
sermon on The Enlargement of Zion. 



In a game featured by the playing 
of "Larry" Lerew, the Scrubs de- 
feated the Carlisle Indian Reserves 
at Carlisle, Saturday, 12 to 7. 

Due to the fact that Lebanon Val- 
ley was represented by three teams 
on Saturday it was difficult for Coach; 
Guyer to select two well balanced* 
teams for the Carlisle and Millers- 
ville Normal games. Considering 
this, the boys who went to Carlisle 
certainly gave a good account of 
themselves. Our touchdowns were 
made in the first and fourth periods 
by Costello and Snavely, and the In- 
dians scored in the fourth period. 

The Indians fought hard thruout 
the game, keeping our boys on the 
jump every minute of play. Snavely 
made several long gains around the 
ends, and Costello plunged thru the 
line consistently. Lerew was the 
star performer on defense, .getting 
at least half of the tackles. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, 'IT 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



The Rally Day Celebration held 
in our church last Sunday suggests 
the idea that a Rally Spirit would be 
a good thing for the college at this 
time of the year's activities. In fact, 
it is clear to many of us that there 
MUST be a rallying of the students 
in all fields of student activity if this 
college year is to mean what it ought 
to mean. There seems to have come 
among the student body a spirit 
which prompts many to act as tho 
the primary object for their coming 
to college, is to have a jolly good time- 
and to have it at the expense of cur- 
ricula work neglected, literary socie- 
ties unattended, and religious affairs 
unheeded. This spirit, moreover, 
manifests itself in the disgraceful 
and deplorable spirit accorded our 
athletic teams by the majority of the 
students. Every student ought to be- 
gin to realize— if he does not al- 
ready — that the college team is the 
official representative of the institu- 
tion he attends, and that their 
achievements will count more toward 
the advertisement, and exaltation of 
our college among the college world 
than anything he as a individual 
may contribute. The team is your 
team. So support it as it rightly de- 
serves. When it suffers defeat it 
ought to be your defeat. When it 
Wins a victory you can count it as 
your victory. 

But even more important than 
rallying around the team is the fact 
that there ought to be a rallying to 
our studies. First and last the 'col- 
lege stands for the training of the 



intellect. The preparation of each 
day's lessons should be the aim of 
every person. The opportunities neg- 
lected now will be sure to bring sea- 
sons of regret and remorse later in 
life. One can bluff his way thru col- 
lege but when the bluffer meets the 
cold world he will encounter an un- 
surmountable bluff. To have a good 
time now means to follow the path 
of least resistance. To insure hap- 
piness in the future means the doing 
of seemingly unpleasant things now-. 
Each one is free to choose. 

Besides this there ought to be a 
rallying to a Literary Society and 
its activities and to the Christian 
Associations and their activities. 
The world will not ask how much 
.one knows but what can one do. Do- 
ing has always counted more than 
knowing and always shall. Every- 
body can and must learn to do by 
doing. The literary societies and 
Christian Associations accomplish 
this very thing. The "good times" 
that these organizations hold out to 
the student are real, lasting and per- 
manent, working good to self and 
others. To accomplish anything 
really worth while in life requires 
a supreme devotion to an high ideal. 
Why not choose for this ideal a 
hearty and enthusiastic interest and 
participation in those things suggest- 
ed above? 



Y. M. C. A. 



Ralph L. Sloat, '18, led Y. M. C. 
A. last Sunday using for his theme, 
"The Life That Counts The Most, or 
The Life Worth While." In the be- 
ginning he emphasized the fact that 
the only life really worth while was 
the one lived in the service of one's 
fellow men. Two essentials in help- 
ing us lead this kind of life are 
love and prayer. Without the first 
we will have no motive to prompt 
us to service, without the latter we 
cannot be efficient in our service. 
The benefits of the life that counts 
are two fold. First, the one who is 
served is benefited by the act and 
second by reaction the one rendering 
the service is blessed. At the conclu- 
sion of Mr. Sloat's remarks, he ex- 
tended an invitation for all present 
to take part in a discussion on the 
subject. This request was met by a 
commendable response. The attend- 
ance was fair but not up to the 
standard that it would be if all 
the fellows would wake up to the 
realization that the Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ings are not for the benefit of a few, 
but all. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The regular weekly service of the 
Y. W. C. A. was held on Sunday un- 
der the leadership of Miss Ruth Hu- 
ber. The subject of the meeting, 
"The Give and Take of College Life," 
was dealt with very well by the 
speaker. The college student must 
guard against the habit of receiv- 
ing more than he gives in return. 



Rube Williams, (instructing class 
in Bio. Lab.) Look thru your micro- 
scope and if you don't see an object, 
it is because it is not there. 



SOCIAL NOTES. 



Miss Helen Tubers was the guest 
of friends in Harrisburg over the 
week-end. 

Miss Myrtle Hawthorne visited 
friends in Harrisburg on Sunday. 

Miss Ethel Lerew and Mr. Austin 
Lerew have returned to college after 
visiting at their home in Dillsburg. 

Mr. Earl Klinger, of Middletown, 
visited friends at the college on Sun- 
day. 

Miss Rena Huff was the guest of 
Miss Ellen Moyer *at her home in 
West Hanover. 

Lot of Senior Hall visited friends 
in Lebanon over the week-end. 

Miss Mary Bergcioll, of Robesonia, 
called on friends at Annville on Sun- 
day. 

Miss Mary Mussina, of Mt. Gretna, 
was the guest of the Bachmans over 
the week end. 

Among those present at the foot- 
ball game of last Saturday were the 
following alumui: Ruth Gingrich, 
'16; Esther Moyer, '16; Faber 
Stengle, '15; M. von Bereghy, '16; 
Joseph Hollinger, '16. 



MUSICAL NOTES 



The "Benefit Recital" given by the 
students of the Conservatory and 
Oratory departments will be held 
Tuesday evening, Nov. 21, in Engle 
Hall. The admission will be 15 
cents, the proceeds going to the Cur- 
tain Fund. Please remember to 
come. 

Recital class Tuesday afternoon at 
4 p. m. 

Miss Mabel Bensing, '15, present- 
ed her pupils in a recital given in 
St. Mark's Reformed Church, Leba- 
non, Pa., Friday evening, Nov. 17th. 
Reports from her home city indicate 
that she has established herself in 
the musical life of the city with suc- 
cess. 

The second number of the Friday 
evening Musical Course was given 
Friday evening by Miss Margaret 
Wilson and her assistants. The par- 
ty from Lebanon Valley made the 
trip by auto. 



LANCASTER COUNTY 

CLUB FORMED 



During last week a number of the 
students, whose homes are in Lan- 
caster County, met and organized a 
club which they called The Lancas- 
ter County Club of Lebanon Valley 
College. About eighteen were pres- 
ent but this number will probably 
be increased to twenty-five or more 
at the next meeting. The following 
officers were elected: — 

President.. Ray Y. Grube 

Vice President Marie Richwine 

Secretary Verna Mutch 

Treasurer Harry S. Yetter 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Literary Societies 



(Slumian Anmufrsarrj 
Hebanatt Bailey (Eullege 

Naurmber tutetttg-frntrth 
nineteen bua&r? h ana Bxxttnx 
at n$bt a clash 
latrjl? (Emtsfmatorg 



CLIO. 

Miss Hoover gave a very interest- 
ing and instructive account of "The 
New Great President of China." We 
learned that his official title is Li- 
Yuaw-Hung, and "In appearance he 
is strong and robust with a dark com- 
plexion, kindly eyes, a pleasant, 
friendly, intelligent expression. In 
manner he is simple and unaffected. 
He is interested in missionaries and 
'especially in Y. M. C. A. work. He 
is not shrinking from his task how- 
•ever great the difficulties. But if he 
succeeds in establishing awd main- 
taining peace in uniting his country 
;and keeping it independent of for- 
eign domination, he will have won 
;an unsurpassed success." 

The musical numbers on the pro- 
gram were rare treats. Clio indeed 
^counts herself fortunate in having 
■the music students render such splen- 
.did selections. 

During the previous weeks we 
-have heard much of the eight hour 
law and yet some of us haven't fully 
• comprehended its real meaning. So, 
■the discussion pro and con, by Miss 
Lenhart and Miss Snyder on this sub- 
ject was intensely interesting and 
rather exciting. Miss Snyder prov- 
ed to us how we did no work at all. 



PHILO. 

S3 

Friday night Philo Hill was well 

filled, a large percentage of the 

members and quite a ; few visitors 

being present to listen to one of the 

best programs of the present year. 

'The attendance was very gratifying 

to all since it denies the cry of 

•some who say society interest as a 

whole is waning. 

The first paper of the evening on 
"Happenings at Other Colleges" was 
read by Mr. Ehrhart. It contained 
many helpful facts as well as some 
pleasing humor, a combination sure 
cf success. 

Next was scheduled an impromptu 
by Mr. Lefever. Before being given 
his subject Mr. Lefever showed signs 
of uneasiness but when the subject 
"Ladies" was announced he showed 
remarkable ability. From his talk 



one could judge the ladies were his 
chief topic of thought and worry. 

The question of whether or not 
our ports should be closed to bellig- 
erent nations was debated affirma- 
tively by Messrs. McLaughlin and 
Snavely, and negatively by Messrs. 
Williams and Herring. Both sides 
showed excellent knowledge of this 
timely subject but the judges decid- 
ed the negative had a shade the bet- 
ter of the argument. 

Mr. Deibler's piano solo came next 
and was much appreciated by all. 
This was followed by a sketch por- 
traying an ideal ( ? ) class in psy- 
chology with Mr. Boughter as the 
Professor and Messrs. Wingerd, 
Sloat, Hastings, Fencil and Heber- 
lig as pupils. To say the least it 
was very amusing and highly in- 
structive. Editor Shettle then pre- 
sented his very much alive "Living 
Thots." His pleasing personalities 
and amusing jokes kept every one 
in an uproar during his entire pa- 
per. 

In closing there was a speech from 
Prof. Grimm and short talks from 
ether of the visitors all of whom 
expressed their pleasure at being 
present. 



KALO, 

The program which was given last 
Friday evening in Kalo Hall was a 
very good one. The first number 
"What Happened" by Chas. C. Hart- 
man was a good live discussion of 
happenings both around school, in 
this country and abroad. The paper 
was well prepared and well read. 
The second number by Amnion Boltz, 
a paper on "Contempory Ideals of 
Education," was a fine discussion of 
the subject. This subject is not one 
to be discussed in a few words, but 
requires much time and research 
work, but to say that Mr. Boltz dis- 
cussed it well is putting it mildly. 
An extemporaneous quartette, com- 
posed of Messrs. Thornton, Nissley, 
Sherk, and Martin showed their fine 
art of music by rendering very artis- 
tically and feelingly two appropriate 
numbers much to the pleasure of all 
those who heard them. The Parll- 
mentary drill which followed was in- 




MARLEY 1V 2 IN. DEVOrJ 2'4 IN. 



ARROW 

COLLARS 

1 5 cts. each, 6 (or 90 cts. 

CLUETT, PEABOD Y & CO., INC. MAKERS 

~WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. Annville, P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. 

If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

F.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

He Redpatn-BrocKway Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 

H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. .:. PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



teresting and full of life. The bill 
to be passed, that of the placing of 
more restrictions upon immigrants 
coming to this country was discuss- 
ed freely on both sides. The debates 
were lively and to the point. After 
much arguing a vote was called for, 
which resulted in the passage of the 
bill. After a chorus by the Society, 
Miles Thornton read a paper on "Im 
pressions." The paper was excellent 
and gave the speaker's impression of 
Lebanon Valley since his arrival at 
school. Taken as a whole-, his im- 
pressions seemed to be most favor- 
able. The program throughout show- 
ed careful preparation on the part of 
those who gave the various numbers. 
Two of the men appeared on the pro- 
gram for the first time, and from 
their work, we predict great suc- 
cess to them. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE 



NEWS 



Have You Seen Our 

Nert College Seal Stationery 

The intrinsic worth, the distinctiveness, the exclusiveness of our 
New College News Stationery cannot be paralled 
in any Writing Paper 

It is Noh? Selling at a Special Price 

Make your purchase before the permanent price goes into effect 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Bell Phone D< B. Bashore, Prop. Antwille, Pa. 



DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 



750 Cumberland St. 



LEBANON 



You are correct If you get your 

LADiES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KINPORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & American Lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JACOB SHBbOH 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 

Hagerstown, Maryland. 

Millersville Normal School Oj 
Reserves 



Millersville State Normal School 
proved a worthy opponent for our 
Reserves at Millersville on Saturday, 
and the gridiron contest ended in a 
to tie. 

With the exception of the third 
quarter, in which period the Normal 
School boys were on our four-yard 
line, neither team was winthin their 
opponent's twenty-yard line. The 
Reserves used all sorts of plays but 
made progress on end runs only, 
while the Millersville team used the 
old style of play. The game was a 
hard struggle from start to finish. 
The Normal School had not won a 
game this year, and seemed to put 



LEBANON VALLEY 33 CARLISLE 
INDIANS 



Continued from page L 



The Carlisle team showed great 
form at times, and at the start of 
the game looked dangerous, but they 
could not withstand the aggressive 
work of the Lebanon Valley eleven. 
May, their left halfback and captain, 
was their only consistent gainer. 

The work of Chas. Loomis and 
"Hinkey" Haines was particularly 
pleasing. Loomis was in the game 
from beginning to end, and many 
times his deadly tackling was in- 
strumental in checking the Red- 
skins. Haines showed that he pos- 
sessed real football ability, and we 
shall expect much from him in the 
future. Line-up: 
Carlisle Indians Lebanon Val. 
L. E. 
L. T. . 
. . L. G. 
... C. 
. R. G. . 
. R. T. . 
. . R. E. 
. Q. B. 
L. H. B. 
R. H. B. 
. F. B. . 
Score by periods: 

Carlisle Indians . — 
Lebanon Valley . 20 13—33 
Touchdowns — Mackert, Atticks, 
Goff, 2; Swartz. Goals from touch- 
downs — Keating, 3. Substitutions 
Carlisle — Walker for Leroy, Leroy 
for Vlalker, Tibbits for Miles, Fran- 
ces for Tibbits. For Lebanon Val- 
ley — De Huff for Forsburg, Mackert 
for Walter, Goff for Mackert, Jaeger 
for Goff. Referee — Saul, Harris- 
burg. Umpire — Cline, Swarthmore. 
Head linesman — Johnson, Newark. 
Time of periods — 15 minutes. 

every effort into this game. 

It may be said that after a num- 
ber of shifts were made, the Re- 
serves played much better football. 
They attempted a field goal in the 
third period but failed. 



Tibbits . . 
Ojitiay, . . 
Tusteke . 
Eshelman 
Pearse . . 
Flinchem 
Mari 

Miles . . . 
May 

Leroy . . . 
Herman . 



. . . Morris 
. . . Atticks 
. Forsburg 

Winneshie 
, . . Loomis 

. Wenrick 
. . . Swartz 
. . . . Rupp 

. . Haines 
. . Keating 

. . Walter 



Grasp the truth of the great law 
that you will find your own life only 
in losing it in the service of others, 
—that the more of your life you so 
give, the fuller and the richer, the 
greater and the grander, the more 
beautiful and the more happy your 
own life will be. 



Failure after long perseverence is 
much grander than never to have 
had a striving good enough to be 
called a failure. 



MILES MORRISON 
Laundry of all kinds 
Received dirty 
Returned Snowy White 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Give me a trial. 

BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 

KEEP WAR[M 

'^ear a 

WRIGHT L ; )ITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Col) rr, Regular Jacket^V' Neck 
and Collarless st^ ies. 

Catal* ue mailed free 

WFIGF 'r & DITSON 

344 Washingtc U St, Bcstoa 

Dr. Hairy Zimmerman 
JJENTIST 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. P. LUHJSKEYjVIflfl 
Queen St. Annville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

EATS? 

C. E. WRY'S 



GOT 'EM 



jCebanon 1/alley 
College 

For Young Men and Wcmen 

Five' Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Music, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 

Bachelor of Arts, 

Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 

2?tev. S. ID. Sossard, {President 

Jtnnville, Pa?] 

D. L SAYL0R & SONS. 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



When patrenizirg Advertisers Mcnticn That You Are From Lebanon Valle 



COIiliEGE flEWS 



LEI3ANON VALLEY 



Volume VIII. 



Rnnville, Pa., Tuesday, Deeembep, 6, 1916 



No. 10 



Entered as second-class matter November 12. 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March S, 1879 



Varsity Bows Clio. Celebrates Lebanon Valley 

to Bucknell 46th Anniversary Defeats Susquehanna 



Bucknell sprung a surprise on 
Lebanon Valley Thanksgiving Day at 
Lewisburg, when our eleven was de- 
feated 8 lo 0. 

The defeat was entirely unexpect- 
ed, but the condition of the grid- 
iron goes a long way toward explain- 
ing the poor showing of Lebanon 
Valley. The rain of Wednesday had 
nut the field in ft shape for making 
mud pies, the mire was more than 
ankle deep, and made anything but 
straight line plunging football Im- 
possible. 

The contest resolved itself into a 
close, hard battle from the start, 
and at the end of the first half no 
scoring had been done by either 
team. During this part of the game 
Lebanon "Valley forced the playing 
and twice had opportunities to score 
touchdowns. Both were forward 
passes, Goff to Adams and Keating to 
Adams, and had the turf afforded a 
suitablp foundation we would un- 
douhtedlv haye been the victors in- 
stead of the vanquished, but luck 
"nassed bv on the other side" and 
"Tim" missed both bv the smallest 
margins, when a clean catch in 
either case meant a touchdown. 
Tim's claying was irrenroachable. 
but with a drv field perhaps there 
would be a different story to relate. 

The second half started as a re- 
plica of the first, with Bucknell hav- 
ing a slight advantage. Then a 
pass from centre went wide and 
Haines wa*i tackled back of our goal 
line after having recovered the ball 
and Bucknell went ahead, 2 to 0. 



Continued on Page 3 



DR. COLVIN ORGANIZES 
PROHIBITION LEAGUE 



D. Leigh Colvin, Ph. D., President 
of the Intercollegiate Prohibition 
Association, made Lebanon Valley a 
Thanksgiving call last Tuesday and 
spoke at length in Chapel about the 
conflict row raging between the ad- 
vocates of national prohibition and 
the saloon interests. He feels that 
thi sconflict will culminate within 
a few years, that a national amend- 
ment is a possibility soon, and that 
the students now in college will be 
brought face to face with the strug- 
gle, and with a great opportunity lo 
lead and to serve the moment they 
step out of college halls. 

During his stay at Lebanon Val- 
ley a meeting of the Prohibition As- 
sociation of L. V. wa sheld and offi- 



Amid the profusioned odors of 
chrysanthemums and roses, and an 
air filled with harmonious tones, 
about four hundred people gathered 
on Friday evening, November 24, in 
Engle Hall for the celebrating of 
Clio's Forty-sixth Anniversary. The 
stage dotted with ferns, decorated 
in gold and white, Clio's colors, and 
Clio pennants and banners, silently 
told the meaning of the occasion. 

The programme that was rendered 
was a splendid one. The orations, 
as well as the reading and solo, 
showed great work and preparation. 
The music, too, needs special men- 
tion. The Lebanon Quintette played 
a rare type of composition such as 
only good musicians can play. 

The President's address, "Educa- 
tion, A Preventive Agency," by Kath- 
erine R. Dasher, was up to and over 
the standard of such official ad- 
dresses. From start to finish, the 
speaker, thru her composure, ease of 
f>pressioi and force of diction, also 
by the soundness of her arguments, 
held her audience snellbound. Show- 
ing. a« she did. that the coming of 
education and the going of vice are 
complimentary processes, and evinc- 
ing so strong a ■ ersonal belief in 
the principles she was evincing, she 
assomplished the desired end of 
nersuading her audience that she 
was right in her doctrine. 

The second number on the pro- 
gram. Vocal Solos by Miss Ethel 
Strickler, was highly appreciated. 
She sang "Ah! Love but a Day." by 
Beach, and "To a Messenger," by 
Rogers, in such a pleasing tone that 
basing Judgment on the applaune, it 
was. indeed, very well done. 

The first oration, "A Member-at- 
Large," bn Miss Nettie Showers was 
excellent both in its thought and 
presentation. The author in the de- 
velopment of her theme showed how 
the longing for commercial gains 
overwhelmed man. how woman in 
entering the business world also 
fell victim to the same disease and 
how even the children are already 
drudging with "Child Labor." Her 
cure fo rthis disease is Christianitv 
and the place to begin is suggested 
in her conclusive statement, "The 
rhiid is *he father of the man" and 
if the Christianity of the future is 
to mold thp character and inspire the 
ideals of the coming America she 
must, begin with the children of to- 
dav." 

The Second Oration, "The Heri- 
tage of the Child," by A. Louise 
Henrv. also. deserves particular 
mention. The author contended 



Lebanon Valley resumed relations 
with Susquehanna University at 
Sunbury Saturday and won their 
fourth consecutive victory, 13 to 0. 
The game was hard fought from start 
to finish, for the teams were more 
nearly matched than had been pre- 
dicted. 

The first half ended with the ball 
near the middle of the field and with 
the scor 5 to 0. Neither side could 
gain consistently and each in turn 
were forced to punt in the fourth 
downs. During this half it seemed 
that Susquehanna had the edge on 
Lebanon Valley, for they had kept 
the pigskin in our territory much 
of the time, but at the beginning of 
the second half even the spectators- 
expected ;is to start the scoring and 
the Varsity did not disappoint them. 

In the third Lebanon Valley 
scored its first touchdown. Cassler, 
the Susquehanna centre, made a poor 
pass as a result of a badly injured 
shoulder and "Hank" Morrison, re- 
covering the ball, booted it for five 
or six yards to give it a good sense' 
of direction, and then picked it up> 
and ran thirty-five yards for a touch- 
down. Keating then kicked the goal 

Soon after the start of the fourth 
quarter Keating made a perfect for- 
ward pass to Atticks, who sprinted 
"0 yards for the second score. The 
kickout was blocked but Lebanon 
Valley was ahead, 13 to 0. From that 
time on till the end of the game 



Continued on Page 4 
THANKSGIVING BANQUET 



Continued on Page 2 



( "ontinued on Page 2 



Monday, November 27th, was a 
busy day for Chef and his crew of 
assistants in the kitchen. It waa 
theoccasion of the annual Thanks- 
giving *? ,'Canquet. And a real ban- 
quet it was too. 

Everything, particularly the appe- 
tites of those banqueted, was pre- 
pared to Chef's best ability and to 
say that it was enjoyed is entirely 
unnecessary when one reads the 
menu following and remembers the 
proverbial hunger of the student 
generally. 

Oyster Cocktail 
Cream of Turkey, a la Reine 
Celery Olives 
Chicken a la Maryland 
Filling 

Cranberry Sauce Asparagus Tips 
Potatoes a la Politan 
Russ Strips 
Salad Oriental 
Mixed Nuts Cream Almonds 

Fruit Cake 
Pie a la Mode After Dinner Mints 
Qaveh 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College |4etus 

Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 

Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
^from the students and Alumnae. All 
.articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



EDITORIAL 

•Socrates taught that, "Knowledgo 
i s virtue. Therefore know thyself." 

Today, we still believe that know- 
ledge is a virtue, but to say that vir- 
tue is wholly dependent on know- 
ledge has been proved to be a fallacy. 
The coalman d made in the second 
part of his maxim, however, is still 
as imperative and as applicable as 
it was at the time it was first spoken. 
"Know Thyself!" 

"What will tVv say?" "What will 
they think?" These are two ques- 
tions that confront us daily and one 1 ? 
that we propound to ourselves with- 
out reaching any satisfactory conclu- 
sions. l Did you ever stop to consider 
how.little thev counted? What you 
do concerns you and concerns you 
more than it can possible concern 
others. No one can test your 
theories as you can test them. No 
one can know your abilities as you 
know them. Quoting from Ralph 
Waldo Trine: — 

"Be true to the highest within 
your own soul and then allow your- 
self to be governed by no customs 
or conventionalities or man-made 
rules that are not founded upon 
principle. 

We cannot be true to ourselves 
and at the same time be false to 
our associates. Our acts will even- 
tually bring us either pleasure or 
sorrow, according to their nature. 
Stated as one of the fundamental 
laws of Physics, "To every action 



there is an equal and opposite reac- 
tion." 

Some days ago a few students were 
assembled in a room, conversing on 
general topics, when one made the 
remark, "I have got a rotten deal 
in almost everything I have ever 
tried around here." A continuation 
of the conversation indicated that, 
according to this individual's opin- 
ion, evaryone around the place, in- 
cluding both faculty and student, 
were the cause of this unfair treat- 
ment. 

Are there any more who have the 
same opinion o f their lot? If so. 
why not seek for the cause within 
yourself? Try to discover by self- 
analysis wherein lies the fault. 

To give your lessons half-hearted 
preparation while your classmates 
are diligent, and then complaining 
about the professors showing partial- 
ity is as absurd as it is childish. To 
walk around with a chronic grouch 
or surrounded by an atmosphere that 
would freeze ice on the Fourth of 
July, and then expect others to treat 
you cordially, is equally as ridiculous 

The first step toward contentment 
in any community is learning to 
know yourself. Then cultivate ideals 
Avorth while within youd soul and be 
true to them. You owe it to the so- 
cial unit of which you are a oart, 
to know yourself. You owe it to 
yourself to be true to the highest 
within your own soul. 



CLIO CELEBRATES FORTY-SIXTH 
ANNIVERSARY 



CLIO, 

Irish Number Dec. 8. 

1. Chorus Society 

2. Select Reading, The Widow 
Joyce's Cloak .... Mary Garver. 

2 Jests Mary Schaack 

4. Vocal Solo Myrtle Saylor 

5. Debate: Resolved that the Irish 
were justified in revolting. 

Affirmative Negative 
Louisa Williams Mae Smith 

Myrtle LeFever Beatrice St.ru ry 
fi. Reading Ada Beidler 

7, Chorus Societv 

8. Olive Branch Editor 



KALO HALL 



Comical Program Dpc. 8. 1915 

Tlut^h T^oi^s C. Shannon 

Some Do and Some Don't 

B. C. V. Ressler 

TTnmorom Roll Call 
"Debate: Resolved that a woman's in- 
tellect is equal to that of a man's. 
Affirmative Negative 
\. L. Boltz R- Nissley 
r p. Greene wait W T . H. Isaacs 
Sin"-. Brothers. Sing 
r>n Yn" Remember? . . L. R. Waters 
The Examiner Editor 



PHILO, 

Life Sketch of President Wil^n . 

"Morrow 

Ae'-ial Preparedness of United 

States Armv ..Edgar C. Hastings 
Debate: Resolved: That Congress 

•■iros Justified in passing the recent 

flight Hour Day Law. 
Affirmative Negative 
W. W. M^Connel Edwin 7«igler 
TT. C. Potter Lester G. Rarig 

Music. 

Heredity and Variation 

Jos. A. Donahue 

Life Jno. H. Herring 



Continued From Page 1 

that "play" is "The Heritage of the 
Child." She held that the child's 
voluntary imitation, when well di- 
rected, developes into the involun- 
tary actions of the man known as 
"good habits." 

She also said that it is a prepar- 
ation which gives him principles of 
organization and co-operation and 
teaches him how to build character 
and resist temptation, making thus 
out o fthe boy of today the perfect 
man of tomorrow. 

"Down in the Dewy Dell" by Clie 
Chorus was rich in musical qualities. 
The chorus sang tin and above its 
usual standard as is evidenced by 
the fact that the audience applauded 
for an encore. 

To the reading, "Tn the Palace of 
the King" by H. R"th Heffelman. 
may well be anplipd the adage "Last 
but not least." The character im- 
oersonation was beyond criticism. 
So well did the reader delineate the 
actors that we almost felt as though 
we saw ca^h one do his own deeds, 
say hi sown words, and act in ner- 
fpet accordance with his character. 
Her nosition and diefinn was such as 
to hold her audience from very start 
to finish. 

After the last number, the Presi- 
dent invited everyone to attend the 
reception in the Ovmnasium. Tbi* 
nlare. also, W*s decorated in Gold 
and White. The Quintette furnished 
t.ho musie while friend mfnglM with 
friend and had a general good time. 
Delightful rpfresh merits wero serv- 
ed at the close of the' Reception. 



Dr, Colvin Organizes Prohibit 
tion League 



Continued From Page 1 



cers elected for the coming year, as 
follows: 

President, E. Harold White, 17j 
Vice-president, William W. McCon- 
nel, '17: Secretary, E. Charles Has- 
tings, '20; Treasurer, Paul Hilbert, 
'19; Reporter, David Gregory. '18. 
Prpoarations are, being made by all 
colleges to send one or more dele- 
gates to the great national conven- 
tion held at Lexington. Kentucky. 
December 28-31, and it is the aim of 
the local league to send at least two 
delegates. Lebanon Valley needs to 
get. in closo t.on*n wttrh this great 
movement and it is honed that the 
student body will do their nart in 
raising funds to send these men 
Among tbe most, nrominent. sneakers 
at this convention will be William 
Jennings Prvan. and Senator Ken- 
yon from Colorada. 

Our friend r. "^inpo'-t has fener- 
ouslv set the bn.ll roiling with * 
eontribution, and we bone that tW 
students, faculty. «ln*nnae, and 
friends of Lebanon VnHev will all 
bpln send r> r^oresentative delega- 
tion to Lexington. 



It is not work that kills men; it 
is worry. Work is healthy: you can 
hardly put more upon a man than he 
can bear. Worry is rust upon the 
blade. — [Henry Ward Beecher. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Varsity Bows to Bucknell 



SOCIAL NOTES 



Continued from Pa<re 1 



From that point until the end of the 
game both teams fought fiercely, and 
when, five minutes before the end of 
the game, Loomis intercepted a for- 
ward pass and carried it to the 
middle of the field it looked again as 
if we would be victorious. But Leb- 
anon Valley was off-side and the ball 
was brought back to our five-yard 
line. On the next play Bucknell 
went thru the line for a touchdown, 
and the crowd went "wild." Buck- 
nell fail-id to kick the goal and 
shortly rfter the game ended. 

The defeat was a great disappoint- 
ment to Lebanon Valley, but Buck- 
nell played a high grade of football 
and deserved to win. Line-up: 



Bucknell 



Lebanon Valley 



Banks R. E. 

Newcomb .... R. T. 
Pindar R. G. 



Gilbert . . 
Fisher . . . 
Cockill . . . 
^ilberstein 
Wad dell . . 
Dent . . . . 
Hendren . 



. . C 

. L. G. . . . 
. . L. T. . . 

. . L. E. . 
. . Q. B. . 

R. H. B. . 
. L. H. B. 



Baldauf F. B. 



. . . . Adams 
. . Mackert 
... Loomis 
Winneshiek 
. . Wenrich 
. . . Atticks 
. . Morrison 

Rupp 

. . . Keatin- ." 

Goff 

. . . Wialter 



Substitutions: Lawrence for Banks 
Kerth for Pindar, Pindar for Kerth, 
Hall for Silberstein, Haines for 
Walter, Larew for Atticks, Forsburg 
for Larew. Swartz for Morrison. 
TTmoire — Wingart, of Susquehanna. 
Referee — Kline, of Cornell. Head 
linesman — Deitrick, of Penn. Time 
of quarters — 12 minutes. 



RESERVES 18 SUNBUEY H. S. 

The Reserves ended their success- 
ful season by defeating Sunbury 
High School at Sunbury on Thanks- 
giving Day, 18 to 0. 

The Sunbury team was a well 
roached eleven, with a fine variety 
of plays, but thev were no match 
for our older and heavier reserve 
t^ar". The game was not without 
It*, doubtful moments, and at differ- 
ent nerio ls of the game Snavely was 
forced ro kick from under the shad- 
ow of his own goal posts, but the 
TJ.eserves were out to win and they 
acoomnlished their aim. 

"Bill" Zeigler plaved one of his 
best games of the year. 



Rumor has it that the Freshmen 
wPTfi on ti banquet yesterday. This 
might ba some indication that they 
are at la^t coming to life and one 
t»f theso days man issue a challenge 
to the Sops for a football game. 



No civilization other than that 
which is Christian is worth seeking 
or possessing. — [Bismarck. 

— o — 

All the world's a stage, but a man 
seldom hears the prompter when he 
misses his cue. 



If youth be a defect, it is one we 
•outgrow only too soon. — [Lowell. 



On Tuesday before the adjourn- 
ment for Thanksgiving- Vacation, a 
group of the Senion girls entertained 
a number of their classmates. The 
evening was spent in making candy, 
playing games and having a good 
time in general. Those present were 
the Misses Catherine Dasher, Nettie 
Showers, Ruth Hoffman and Naomi 
Hand; Mi. Abram Long, Mr. Ross 
Swartz, Mr. Charles Horstick and 
Mr. Charles Loomis. 



A. delightful little taffy-pulling 
narty was held in the kitchen at 
Senior Hall last Tuesday evening 
The earlier part of the evening was 
Koent in playing games while later 
the puzzling proposition — pulling 
taffy — occupied the more industrious 
members in attendance. Those pres- 
ent were Misses Pauline Clark. Ruth 
Ruber. May Garver, Violet Wolfe, 
Christine Carter, Esther Bachman, 
Messrs. Harold White, Edwin H. 
Zeigler, Paul S. Wagner, William 
Keating. D. R. Fink. Marlin Wen- 
rich and LeRoy Umberger. 

— o — 

Miss Gertrude Schmidt and Miss 
May Belle Adams were "at home" + o 
r>bout thirty-five guests on Friday. 
Dec. 1, at the home of Mrs. David 
Kreider. The rooms were beauti- 
fully decorated with ferns and chry- 
santhemums while the lighted can- 
nier adlpd a delecate glow to the 
t»ble which was presided over by 
Mrs. Sheldon and Miss Seltzer, who 
p listed ihf hostess by pouring tea 
and chocolate. 



Miss Floss Mentz '15, who is at 
present teaching in the High School 
at High Bridge, N. J., spent her 
thanksgiving vacation the guest of 
Miss Kathryn Bachman. 



Mr. Ralph Stickell '15, now in the 
^mplov o fone of the Kreider Dis- 
tributing Houses in Pittsburg, snent 
several days visiting friends at school 
during Thanksgiving vacation. 



Loving kindness is greater than 
laws; and the charities of life are 
more than all ceremonies. — [Talmud. 



The cheerful live longest in years, 
and afterwards in our regards. 
Cheerfulness is the offshoot of good- 
ness. — [Bovee. 




X BERWICK 

«w Arrow 

JormJit COLLARS 

are curve cut to fit the shoulders 
perfectly. iy cents each, bjorqo* 

CLL1ETT. PEABODY & CO: INC 'Malurs 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. Annville.'P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. 

If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

F.UFUSR. NESS, Agent 

Tie Redpam-BfOGKwey Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 



H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced- Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 

THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. .:. PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



Have You Seen Our 

Neti? College Seal Stationery 

The intrinsic worth, the distinctiveness, the exclusiveness of our 
New College Seal Stationery cannot be paralled 
in any Writing Paper 

It is Noh? Selling at a Special Price 

Make your purchase before the permanent price goes into effect 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Bell Phone D. B. Bashore, Prop. Annville, Pa. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The liive Store 



fllrjgaVs Reliable 



s 



VISIT DOUTt^ICH'S 

OVERCOAT pfllH 

Over Four Thousand Overcoats on display at 
this "Live Store." 

Every day was a banner day last week. You 
would have to pay $5.00 to $10.00 for similar gar- 
ments elsewhere. 

Step in Doutrich's and say Overcoats. You'll 
find the best here at $15.0.0, $20.00, $25.00. 

OUTHICH 'S 



304 Market St. 



Harrisbupg, Pa- 



DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 

You are correct if you get your 

LADilES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KIN PORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & American lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shins 



Lebanon Valley 

Defeats Susquehanna 



Ganser L. G Lew 

Bishop C Kleinfelter 

Keeler R. G Horn 

Slesser R. T Looker 

Bomberger . . R. E Wine 

Kieffer Q. B Snavely 

Young .... L. H. B Rupp 

Shaub R. H. B Baynes 

Kreder F. B Costello 

Touchdowns — Rupp, 2 ; Costello, 
Shetter. Referee — Donahue, Leba- 
non Valley. Time of periods — 10 
and 12 minutes. 



| BURDAN'S 
{ ICE CR.EAM 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 

KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT £ DITSON SWEATER 

Feversible Collar, Regular Jacket,_V' Neck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 Washington St. Bcston 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



Continued from page I 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 



READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 

RESERVES WIN SERIES 

The Lebanon Valley Reserves won 
the deciding game of the series with 
Palmyra on the 25 th, 24 to 0. 

Altho the game was not in doubt 
at any moment of play, it was not 



neither side could get near the goal 
posts, and the score remained un- 
changed until the timskeeper's 
whistle ended the game. 

Captain Mackert played a wonder- 
ful defensive game, time after time 
he was directly responsible for the 
failure of Susquehanna to score. Pe- 
ters, the game Susquehanna quarter- 
back, was injured several times and 
was finally forced to leave the field 
on account of his bruises. 
Susquehanna Leb. Val. 

Murphy L. E Morrison 

Middlesworth . . L. T Attick 

Harman L. G Wenerich 

Gassier C Wheinshick 

Harkins R. G Loomis 

Farrell R. T. Mackert 

Dougherty .... R. E Adams 

Peters Q. B Rupp 

Sweety R. H. B Goff 

Kirk L. H. B Keating 

Martz F. B. Walters 

Referee — Ryan, Michigan, Umpire 
— Houck, U. of P. Head linesman — 
Dietrich, U. of P. Substitutions — 
Susquehanna: Horton for Cassler; 
Lebanon Valley: Larew for Loomis, 
Loomis for Mackert, Machert for 
Walters. Stahle for Larew. Time 
of quarters — 12 minutes. 



without its thrills. The contest was 
the roughest played by the Reserves 
this season, and several times the 
spectators surrovinded the players 
with the perious intention of "bring- 
side or the other. The Reserves 
journeyed to the neighboring town 
wtih the serious intention of "bring- 
ing horn? the bacon," of the skin 
that once upon a time covered it, 
and they all played well. Shetter, 
however, played an exceptionally 
fine game. Line-up: 
Palmyra Lebanon Valley 

Hess L. E. Shetter 

Louiser .... L. T Buckwalter 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. P. UJHISI^EYjyiflrl 
Queen St. flnm/ille, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

EATS? 

C. E. WRY'S 



GOT 'KM 



jCebanon Q/alley 
College 

For Young Men and Wcmcn 

Five Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Music, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 

Bachelor of Arts, 

Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 

&ev. S. S>. Sossard, SPresitten* 

D. L. SAYL0R<:& SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER -and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



When patronizing Advertisers Mention That Yen Are From Lebanon Valley 



I 



COIiliEGE NEWS 



LEBANON VALiLj 



Volume VIII. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, December, 12, 1916 



No. 11 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 



Philo. Smoker "Hank" Morrison Freshmen Banquet 



Thursday evening the upper class- 
men of Philo revived the former cus- 
tom of giving an informal smoker 
and general get-together party in 
honor of her underclass members. 

The early part of the evening was 
spent in playing games of various 
kinds and, of course, smoking. 
Everybody smoked, regardless of the 
morning after. 

Later a mock trial was given in 
which Horstick was charged, tried 
and convicted of stealing a chicken 
by the novel method of a fishing 
line baited with a grain of corn 
and suspended from his window. 
Judge Rutherford sentenced the of- 
fender to nineteen years of hard la- 
bor in the Eastern Penitentiary. 

After the trial the orchestra fur- 
nished music for dancing which in 
turn furnished appetite for the re- 
freshments that followed. 

A quartette, and more games and 
songs by the crowd wound up this 
most enjoyable evening. 



Elected Captain 

A meeting of the "L" men of the 
1916 football team was held and S. 
Franklin (Hank) Morrison elected 
captain of next fall's eleven. Hank 
has completed his third year as a 
Lebanon Valley end and his election 
as captain is testimony of his work. 




Y. W. C. A. 

One of the best Y. W. C. A. serv- 
ices of the year was held on Sunday 
in the Engle Conservatory. "Pur- 
pose the Backbone of Character," the 
topic for the day was dealt with in 
a pleasing and helpful manner by 
the leader, Miss Kathryn Harris. Af- 
ter a general discussion of the sub- 
ject, Miss Ruth Craft, of Ursinu;; 
College, and our Y. W. C. A. repre- 
sentative to the National Board, 
gave a most interesting talk on the 
relation of our Y. W. C. A. to the 
whole world. Many of us do not 
realize to what a great organization 
we belong, we are not merely a lit- 
tle independent society, but are part 
°f a great national association We are 
a link in a large chain which is 
striving to encircle the world, and 
it is our duty and obligation to make 
our link as strong as possible. To 
carry forward the work of such an 
organization as the Y. Wt C. A. 
takes will power, and determined 
Purpose, but since these are the 
"backbone of character" the effort is 
worth while. 



The election of a leader in any line 
of sport is a serious undertaking, for 
much depends upon the example set 
and the part taken by him in shap- 
ing the policies of the team. Hank 
has always been a hard worker in 
football, and the selection of the "L" 
men has the popular approval of the 
entire student body. We wish him 
nothing worse than the captaincy 
of the best team that Lebanon Val- 
ley will have produced. 

BASKET BALL SQUAD 

BEGINS PRACTICE 



Though it is no longer customary 
for the Sophomores to attempt in- 
terference with the Freshman ban- 
quet, the Freshmen this year evi- 
dently wished to take no chances, 
going directly from their homes Dec. 
4th to Lancaster, where in the-. 
Brunswick Hotel the banquet was 
held. 

Upon the request of Miss Seaman, 
the chaperone, the City Father of 
Lancaster, dispensed with the usual 
nine o'clock curfew so that no in- 
terruption could be possible on that 
score. 

The banquet was served promptly 
at eight o'clock, about thirty Fresh- 
men being present. After they had 
devoured everything within sight, 
the Toastmaster, Mr. Butler, called 
on the following people who respond- 
ed with toasts. Mr. Seltzer, Presi- 
dent's Address; Miss Fink, "Our 
Boys;" Mr. Ressler, "Our Girls;" 
Miss Snavely, "The Life of a Fresh- 
man." 

Afterwards a dance was held in 
the commodious hall of the hotel. 

Every Freshman present ireports 
having had an exceptionally fine 
time though apparently all were 
glad to return to school Tuesday 
morning. 



With the football season a part 
of Lebanon Valley history, attention 
is already beginning to centre 
around the coming basketball sea- 
son. Captain Charles Loomis and 
Coach Guyer have had the twenty- 
five candidates practicing for the 
past two weeks, and there seems to 
be a glowing prospect for the win- 
ter. 



Continued on Page 4 

Please do not forget the 
Annual Christmas Bizaare 
held under the auspices of the 
Y. W. C. A., in the gym., Sat. 
Dec. 16. 



Y. M. C. A. 

We were fortunate in having with 
us last Sunday in Y. M. C. A. Rev. 
Whitman who brought one of the 
most helpful and inspiring messages 
of the year. As a Scripture lesson 
he used the life of Moses and his 
relation with God and the Israelites. 
He pointed out the disappointments 
that Moies experienced and showed 
how God always turned these disap- 
pointments into blessings. From this 
he drew the practical application of 
how we often in the face of the most 
bitter disappointment, when we have 
our ambitions or plans for the fu- 
ture shattered, may find that this. is 
merely a new avenue that God hats 
opened uu for us in his Divine wis- 
dom. The meeting was well at- 
tended and a new vision of life or 
at least .a renewal of inspiration was 
given to those present. 

Next Sunday the leader of the 
meeting will be Russell R. Ehrhart, 
who will use as his subject. "The 
Real Spirit of. Christmas." 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 

Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



Editor-in-Chief 
CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 

THE MODERN EDUCATIONAL 
^ TENDENCY. 



ing that genius is not transmitted 
from father to son, the latter must 
strive for all his attainments — a 
matter of years and midnight oil — ■ 
while the college can add anything 
in a day by mere appointment. 
Time, patience and application, then, 
are necessary requisites. But, with- 
out the least pessimism, we may 
safely say that the general trend is 
to "get by" and not to get things 
thoroly by spending any length of 
time or diligence over it. There are 
too many other affairs to occupy the 
time of the student and in a way 
he isn't to be blamed for the lack of 
preparation, for every obstacle being 
placed in his way, rather than re- 
moved, it is no wonder that he finds 
no spare moments. Then, too, laxity 
of requirement on the part of Pro- 
fessors determines to a great extent 
the course that a student takes, 
favorable or unfavorable, disposed or 
indisposed. 

Summing up, the modern tend- 
ency is not "how much can I, as a 
student, get out of my course," but 
"how much must I, as a student, get 
out of any course in order to pass" 
placing the responsibility almost di- 
rectly upon the laxity or severity 

of the faculty. 

{ 

A CHRISTIAN'S THOUGHTS 

AT LIFE'S EVENTIDE. 



"One of tbe great problems of mod- 
ern concern is "Is the world growing 
better or becoming worse?" Al- 
though this is a matter for theologi- 
cal discussion as a rule, it may also 
*"be applied to the educational and 
Institutional side of life is the Ameri- 
can College and its student on a 
higher plane of application than it 
was ten, twenty or more years ago, 
or is it retrograding? 

So far as the plane of College, it- 
self, is concerned, its curriculum is 
one of ever increasing efficiency, for 
it has at its disposal the right of 
adoption and use of every advanced 
principle, and theory that any indi- 
vidual in his zest for supremacy has 
advanced and estabished. Thus con- 
tinually clinging to what it already 
has, and adding as it sees fit, or as 
competition demands, the college has 
no chance to deteriorate education- 
ally. 

Now, then, let us consider the con- 
stituents of the College, the students. 
What is the tendency among these? 
Here, we cannot make any compari- 
son between the established College 
and the created student, for, believ- 



I feel that God is calling 

With his wondrous drawing love, 

'Tis easing all my suffering 

As it flows from Heaven above, 

i 

And I know my Saviour's waiting 
In a robe of spotless white, 
To greet a wandering pilgrim 
To a place eternally light. 

Where there shall be no darkness 
For the light is from the Son, 
Reflected from the Father's glory 
Around the great white throne. 

There will be singing and rejoicing 
For the Father's wondrous love, 
How he sent his Son to save us 
From a world of sin and woe. 

Twill be a sweet and blessed privi- 
lege 

As we kneel around the throne, 
When the glory of Heaven fills usa 
And we know as we are known. 

IF; 

Loved ones there will greet ua fl 
With a happy gladsome smile. 
And then a great reunion 
Which will last for all the while. 

There we'll praise our blessed master 
In a bright and endless day. 
And anchored in his fulfilled promise 
We will never drift away. 

— Edgar C. Hastings, '19. 



SOCIAL 

Miss Ruth Croft, from Ursinus 
College wag the guest of the Y. W. 
C. A. over the week-end. 

Messrs. Dan Walter and Douglas 
Beidle were the guests of Mr. Dale 
Garber, at his home in Florin. 

Miss Mary Haines visited Miss 
Ethel Rupp at her home in Chambers 
Hill. 

— o — ' 

Miss Evelyn Snavely spent Sun- 
day visiting friends in Lebanon. 

Miss Ruth Loser was the guest of 
Miss Lucy Seltzer over the week-end 

Mr. Austin Lerew returned to col- 
lege on Sunday after visiting at his 
home in Dillsburg. 

Professor Derickson, who has been 
ill for the past few months, has been 
given leave of absence to recuperate. 
The faculty and student body un- 
doubtedly miss Professor Derickson 
and the absence of his quiet influ- 
ence has been keenly felt during his 
illness. Professor Ardnt of Perdu 
University and a member of Lebanon 
Valley's class of 1914 will take 
charge of the Biology department 
after Christmas until Professor Der- 
ickson's return. 

Professor Derickson would like all 
Biology reference books returned im- 
mediately to the Labratory. It is 
especially imperative that "Parker's, 
Ontogeny" be returned. 



'MUSICAL NOTES" 



The third number of the Friday 
evening musicale course at Harris- 
burg was given Dec. 8 by Leopold 
Godowsky, pianist, assisted by Miss 
Belle Story, young American prima 
donna. Three auto parties from 
Lebanon Valley College Conservatory 
of Music enjoyed their most delight- 
ful and entertaining program. 



We are sorry to note the death of 
Rev. S. B. Wengert, father of Miss 
Sara Wengert, Conservatory, and to 
her we extend our sincere sympa- 
thies. 



JUNIOR PLAY. 



The Junior Class has chosen 
"Anne, of Old Salem," an historical 
drama in three acts for their annual 
play. The caste chosen by Miss 
Adams is now busily engaged prac- 
tising under her tulelage. 

It is proposed to present the pla^ 
sometime in February and a produc- 
tion to warrant your best support i* 
guaranteed. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



PHILOKOSMIAN. 



Philos • program opened Friday 
"evening with a very interesting 
^'Sketch of the Life of President Wil- 
Bon." From the facts in Mr. Mor- 
row's paper it was easily seen how 
Mr. Wilson has attained his present 
position as Chief, Executive of our 
Nation. 

Mr. Hastings' discussion of the 
"Aerial Preparedness of the U. S. 
Army" followed. He showed on the 
one hand the general inadequacy of 
•our aerial supplies as compared on 
ihe other with the indomitable 
American Spirit for meeting any 
situation, the increased interest and 
appropriations of the various states 
for aerial preparedness and the 
nucleus of the aerial coast patrol 
that has its beginning in Maine. 

The debate on the Justifiability of 
the Eight Hour Day law followed. 
Messrs. McConnel and White were 
the Affirmative speakers, Messrs. E. 
Zeigler and Rarig the Negative. The 
preparation of the debaters was ex- 
cellent and their analysis of this im- 
portant, present day problem marks 
them as capable candidates for fu- 
ture legal honors. The judges up- 
held the affirmative in their decision. 

Mr. Fencil's flute solo was also 
very much appreciated as was shown 
hy the applause compelling an en- 
core. 

The last number was a paper on 
"Life" by Mr. Boughter. Mr. Bough- 
ter treated both psychological and 
practical side of this rather broad 
subject in his usual philosophically 
humorous way. 



CLIO-PHILO JOINT SESSION 



Philo Hall, December 15, 1916 
Piano Duet Rachael Dare, 

Irma Rhoads. 

Original Story Isaac Boughter 

Reading Helen Shaak 

Quartette — Jesse Zeigler, Virginia 

Smith, Martha Schmidt,- David 

Gregory. 

Science and Feminism. .E. D. Williams 
Sketch — Esther Bachman, Chas. 
Horstick, Merab Gamble, Marlin 
Wenrich, Elena Sechrist, Frank 
Attinger, Evelyn Snavely, Mark 
Wingerd. 

"Olive Branch" and "Living Thots," 
Editors. 

Visitors welcome. 



The life that goes out in love to all 
is the life that it full, and rich, and 
continually expanding in beauty and 
in power. Such is the life that be- 
comes ever more inclusive, and hence 
larger in its scope and influence. 



Simply the first hour of this new 
day, with all its richness and glory, 
with all its sublime and eternity-de- 
termining possibilities, and each suc- 
ceeding hour as it comes, but not be- 
fore it comes — that is the secret of 
character building. 

Life is not so complex if we do not 
persist in making it so. We need 
faith; we need to be brave; we need 
chronically to keep the corners of 
the mouth turned up and not down. 
And after all it is only a step at a 
time. 



KALOZETIAN 

If anyone could have listened to 
• the program which the Kalozetian 
Literary Society rendered last Friday 
night without as much as smiling, 
that person must have surely been 
made of stone, for the entire pro- 
gram was humorous, and some parts 
extremely funny. The first number, 
"Dutch Epics," by Carl Shannon, 
was divided into twO parts, as the 
writed said: one part, Pennsylvania 
Dutch, and the other, some kind of 
Dutch. The paper was well written 
and contained some very attractive 
subject matter. 

The i&econfl number, "Some Do 
and Some Don't," by B. C. V. Ress- 
ler was a paper full of truths as 
some people know them. Not only 
was the paper well written but it 
was well presented and it was also 
received ver ywell. This paper was 
followed by a Humorous Rollcall, at 
which time every member o fthe So- 
ciety present, as well as the visitors 
responded with a joke or anecdote. 
The collection of stories given would 
have been fit to be placed in the 
best joke book published, for they 
were all good, end several of them 
exceptional. 

Then came the debate "Resolved, 
That Woman's Intellect Is Equal to 
That of Man's," debated affirmative- 
ly by Ammon Boltz and O. P. Green- 
await, and negatively by Raymond 
Nissley and Wm. Isaacs. The debate 
was interesting, lively and funny, 
and decided by the judges in favor 
of the negative. 

After the singing of the German 
edition of "De Wacht am Rhein," L. 
R. Walters read "a paper on "Do You 
Remember?" The paper proposed to 
have been written in 1936 and 
brought back memories of more than 
20 years before. While not extreme- 
ly humorous, the paper was written 
in a light vein throughout. The 
Editor of the Examiner surely had a 
remarkable number of this much ap- 
preciated paper, judging from the 
laughs and the applause. 

Visitors always find a hearty wel- 
come awaiting them, and are al- 
ways invited to visit the Society. 
PROGRAMME 

Dec. 15, 1916 
National Comment .... J. Gingrich 
Piano Duet . . G. Greer, P. E. Hilbert 
The British Blacklist . .M. L. Brown 

Colonial America, C. H. Frost 

Vocal Solo, .......... M. Morrison 

Essay E. Allen 

Visitors "\Velcome 




c£ A TALBOT 

£ Arrow 

Hit COLLARS 

are curve cut to ftt the 
shoulders perfectly *gg* 

Cluett, peabody &Cb;lnc.lMaktrs 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 



a specialty 



W. Main St. 



Annville.jP 



Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. 

If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Hershey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

Be Heapain-BrocKway Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 

H. J. HEIMBACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 



THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of duality 
LEBANON PA. 
839 Cumberland Street 



Special Attention 

First Aid to Xmas Shoppers 

AT THE 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

A glance over our choice Holiday goods will convince you that 
our line is complete and up-to-date. 

SUGGESTIONS:— Pennants, Cushion Tops, College Seal Jewelry, Leath- 
er Banners and Cushion Tops with Seal, Fancy Box Stationery, Manicuring Sets, 
Desk Sets, Brass Sets, Military Brushes, French Ivory Toilet Sets, Photo 
Albums, Holman and Scofield Bibles, Wallets, and Leather Goods, Xmas Gift 
Boxes, Alma Mater Song, Framed Art Pictures and all the Latest Fiction. 

NOTE OUR THREE SPECIAL LINES 

Kodaks-Parker Lucky Curve Fountain. Pens -Hopewell Dainties 

Bell Phone D. B. Bashore, Prop. Annville, Pa. 



When Patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are from Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The liive Store 



fllcaays Keliable 



VISIT DOUTRICH'S 

OVERCOAT FRIH 

Over Four Thousand Overcoats on display at 
this "Live Store." 

Every day was a banner day last week. You 
would have to pay $5.00 to $10.00 for similar gar- 
ments elsewhere. 

Step in Doutrich's and say Overcoats. You'll 
find the best here at $15.00, $20.00, $25.00. 



which vibrates thru the soul, leap.s 
in the warm pulses, and urges us 
to deeds of mercy. This man whose 
sympathies are with common human- 
ity, breathes thoughts that will nev- 
er die. 

There is, — 
Nothing purer than honesty, 
Nothing sweeter than charity, 
Nothing warmer than love, 
Nothing richer than wisdom, 
Nothing brighter than virtue, 
Nothing more steadfast than faith; 

These united in one mind form the 
purest, the sweetest, the warmest, 
the richest, the brightest, and the 
most lasting happiness. 

Contributed — Carl Erb Shannon 

Annville, Ea. 

BURDAN'S 



OUTHICH'S 8 ICECREAM 



304 Market St. 



Ha^Pisburg, Pa. 



DR. SAMUEL B. CROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 



BASKET BALL SQUAD 

BEGINS PRACTICE 



Continued from page 1 



You are correct if you get your 

LADJES 5 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 
AT 

KIN PORTS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Fackard & .American Lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAIL OR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa 

MOLLER PIPE ORGANS 

Twenty-one hundred in use. The 
highest grade instruments at mod- 
erate prices. Specifications and esti- 
mates on request. Write for catalogs. 

M. P. MOLLER 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 



.. From last year's quintet there are 
Captain Loomis, Ex-captain William 
Swartz, Keating, Atticks, Walter and 
Shetter, Kollinger being the only 
man lost by graduation, and around 
these six men can be built a strong 
team. Many of the new candidates 
are showing basketball ability, "and 
altho open positions will be few, 
everyone will be given a thoro try- 
out and the post warded to the best 
man. 

Manager Boltz has prepared the 
following schedule: 

Dec. 14 — Lebanon Y. M. C. A., 
here. 

Jan. 10 — Temple, here. 

Jan. 19 — Mt. St. Mary's, away. 

Jan. 20 — Washington & Lee, away. 

Jan. 27 — Juniata, here. 

Feb. 1— St. Francis, away. 

Feb. 2 — Juniata, away. 

Feb. 3 — Susquehanna, away. 

Feb. 9 — Bucknell, away. 

Feb. 10— State, away. 

Feb. 13 — Delaware, here. 

Feb. 17 — Susqrehanna, here. 

Feb. 20 — Moravian, away. 

Feb. 21 — Lafayette, away. 

Feb. 24 — Moravian, here. 

March 2 — Drexel, away. 

March 3 — Tentple, away. 



Z)r. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 



W. Main St. 



GENIUS 
( 

He ig not a Genius in the greatest 
sense of the word, the man who, with 
his giant intellect, startles the mul- 
titude jvith sudden thunder. 

There is a mightier: he who 
would stir up the soul, with a kind, 
sympathizing heart. It is this 



Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 

KEEP WARM 

Wear a 

WRIGHT L DITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, VMNeck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 



WRIGHT & DITSON 



344 Washington St, 



Bcstcn 



Just Received a New Supply 

Cf Pa'ms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. P. rxiHiSKEYJviflN 
Queen St. Annville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

BATS? 

C. EC. WRY'S 



GOT 'KM 



jCebanon 7/ alley 
College 

For Young Men and Women 

Five Departments: — 
College Proper, Academy, Music, 

Oratory and Art. 
Grants degrees: — 

Bachelor of Arts, 

Bachelor of Science, 

Bachelor of Music. 
Eight modern buildings. 
Well-equipped Gymnasium. 
Low rates 

Write for information 

&ot>. S. 2>. Sossard, President 

J&inville, SPa 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER und COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 



Annville, Pa 

When patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are Virom Lebanon Valley 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume VIII. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Dee— 19^ 1916 

Rufus H Xefever 



No. t-2- 



Entered as second-clast matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, k^, 

Gtye Exfrttte Irat W\Bl\tB ta All for a> 
iHrrrg (EIjnBttttaH attfc a Ifaptnj ui f ?ar J* 





CUo/Philo Holds 

Joint Session 

Friday night Philo and Clio met 
in their first Joint Session of this 
year. The meeting was held in Philo 
Hall and as customary at the first 
Joint Session, Philos officers presided. 
The Hall was crowded to its capac- 
ity, nearly every member of both 
Societies being present in the hope of 
a good program. A hope that was 
later fully gratified. 

The first number was representa- 
tive of Clio's excellent musical tal- 
ent, a piano duet by Misses Dare and 
Rhodes. 

Mr. BouglUer's original story fol- 
lowed. Mr. Boughter chose for his 
subject, "The Pain of Preparation," 
and under this head he treated 
graphically some of the many woes 
of mankind in general and of the 
L. V. male student in particular. 
The story was humorous throughout, 
though withal it was very practical. 

After this story Miss Helen Schach 
read "Convict B606." This reading 
is one full of the Christmas spirit 
and as presented by Miss Schach was 
thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

The next number was musical, a 
quartette by Misses Smith and 
Schmidt, and Messrs. Gregory and 
Zeigler. Had the quartette bee'! 
willing they would have been made 
to sing many times but the audience 
was compelled to be satisfied with 
one encore. 

"Science and Feminism," a paper 
by Mr. Williams, was next on the 
program. The subject seemed to 
warrant a serious paper and Mr. 
Williams treated it seriously. He 
had an excellent paper, however, one 
from which much could be learned 
if it was carefully followed. 

Continued on Pay-e 2 



JUNIOR PLAY 



The Junior Play, "Anne, of Old 
Salem," will be given Monday, Janu- 
ary 29, 1917, instead of in February 
as announced last week. Reserved 
seats will be on sale at the College 
Book Store, Monday, Jan. 22. Ad- 
mission 35 cts. Reserved seats, 10 

cts. extra. 



Foot Ball Men 
Given Their 
Annual Banquet 

The College, as is the annual cus- 
tom, gave the football men a ban- 
quet last Wednesday in the College 
Dining Hall. As to th e "eats" — 
that is a thing that speaks for itself. 
Menu 

Oysters on Half Shell 
Cream of Turkey a la Reine 
Irish Sherbet 
Roast Chicken filling Giblet Sauce 

Glazed S-ivcet Potatoes 
Asparagus Tips Cranberry Sauce 
Melba Smelts 
Franconia Potatoes 
Queen Olives Celery 
Escalloped Clams 
L. V. C. Salad Saltines 

Mince Pie a la Mode 
Mixed Cakes Mixed Nuts 

Bon Bons 
Figs Dates 
Java 

After Dinner Mints 
After this sumptuous meal, the 
Toastmaster, Dr. Gossard, called for 
remarks from Coach Guyer, Manager 
Wagner, Captain Mackert, Dr. 
Spangler, Prof. Shroyer, Prof. 
Warner, Dr. Brunner — the latter 
four being the invited guests — Asst. 
Mgr. Gemmell and Captain-Elect 
Morrison respectively. 

An event of this nature was en- 
tirely fitting and in order after so 
snlendid a season. Starting with the 
first game, the Army, let us notice 
several especially commendable fea- 



Basket Ball Team 
Wins First Game 



Continued on Page 3 



MATH ROUND TABLE 



Last Wednesday eve at 6:30, the 
Math Round Table met in its 
monthly meeting. The first number 
on the program "Early Mathematics" 
by Violet Wolfe was interesting and 
ontertaining. The second number, 
"The Cause for the Dislike of Math" 
by Harold Risser, was well discussed. 
Taking his word as final, those who 
dislike math may as a rule trace 
their dislike for it to some incompe- 
tent teacher. 



Lebanon Valley opened the bas- 
ketball reason Thursday evening by 
defeating the Lebanon Y. M. C. A. 
team 51 to 38. The game is an an- 
nual affair, and as the purpose of the 
contest is primarily a trying-out con- 
test by the coach and captain; sev- 
eral new men were seen in the game 
for Lebanon Valley. 

The first half was a whirlwind af- 
fair, in which our boys did most of 
the "whirling " The team-work and 
passing was excellent for the first 
gume of the year. Keating and 
Swartz struck their old stride the 
moment the referee's whistle blew, 
and nothing could stop them; bas- 
kets were scored from any angle and 
from ev"ry point, on the floor. Selt- 
zer player his first varsity game at 
centre, and was in the game every 
minute. Captain Loomis played his 
usual strong, steady game, break- 
ing up passes and taking the ag- 
gressive at opportune moments. The 



Continued on Page 4 



Y. W. C. A. BAZAAR 



The annual Y. W. C. A. Bazaar 
was held on Friday, Dec . 16th, in the 
college gymnasium. The constant 
babble of voices mingled with the 
variety of gay colors seemed to trans- 
port every one to a real Oriental 
Bazaar. The booth committees vied 
with each other to obtain highest 
honors for decorations and indeed 
there was great evidence of close 
competition. The fortune telling 
corner was a great novelty but all 
will agree that nothing was so novel 
as the Old Curiosity Shop. Many 
beautiful scenes in Greece, The De- 
struction of China, High Tide and 
Low Tide together with many other 
interesting historic and scientific 
antiques afforded much laughter. 
Most every thing from ice cream to 
costly embroideries could be had at 
the various booths. Many people in- 
cluding Coach Guyer found' a reim- 
bursement of the pocketbook neces- 
sary before the end of the evening. 
The Bazaar Committee feels that the 
whole affair was a great success. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^euis 



Issued weekly during the Col- 
lege Year by the Students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 

» 

Editor-in-Chief 

CHARLES LOOMIS, '17 

Associate Editors 
NETTIE M. SHOWERS, '17 . 
PAUL S. WAGNER, '17...' 
HUBERT R. SNOKE, '18 

Social Editor 
KATHERINE R. DASHER, '17 

Athletic Editor 
E. HAROLD WHITE, '17 

Music Editor 
MIRIAM R. OYER, '17 

Alumni Editor 
L. R. WALTERS, '18 
Business Manager 
HAROLD W. RISSER, '17 



Subscription price. . . .$1.00 per year 

Single copies 5 cts. 

Clubs of ten 75 cts. 



Address all business communica- 
tions to Harold W. Risser, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



The editor solicits contributions 
and items of interest to the College 
from the students and Alumnae. All 
articles for publication should be 
given or sent to the editor not later 
than Saturday evening. 



THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT 



The Leader in Y. M. C. A. on Sun- 
day, speaking on the topic, "The 
Christmas Spirit," recalled to our 
minds the first Christmas, nearly two 
thousand years ago. That was the 
occasion of the first and greatest 
Christmas gift, The gift of God to 
the entire world in the form of 
Christ, His only son, who after a 
short but serviceable life, gave Him- 
self a sacrifice for the sins of the 
world. 

Out of that, or rather in commem- 
oration of that day, the custom of 
exchanging gifts among relatives 
,and friends was established, a cus- 
tom that has prevailed down thru 
Ahe centuries, which fact is charac- 
teristic of this custom alone and dis- 
tinguishes it from all others. If we 
were to define the Christmas spirit, 
■we might speak of it as the general 
mtmosphere of good-will, good-cheer, 
happiness and joy that is prevalent 
around Christmas Day, brought 
'about by the following out of this 
.custom. 

It is claimed by some, however, 
and probably with some degree of 
.validity, that we have allowed the 
spirit of the season to degenerate. 
That we are usually happy and joy- 
ful because of what we receive rath- 
er than what wc give. Other assert 
that we have lost many of the quali- 
fies which should be present in the 
heart of a true giver. The motive, 
for instance, is often the base one of 



expecting something in return, or 
sometimes, we give out of a feeling 
of obligation. Contrasted this we 
have spirit in which God made his 
immortal gift, a spirit containing 
primarily the noble elements of love 
and sacrifice. Since we established 
a custom thru the act of the first 
' Giver, why not try to approximate 
His spirit also, in carrying out this 
custom? ! ' 

What should be the nature of our 
gifts? 

That is a matter for the individual 
to decide, but remember, the gift is 
secondary to the motives which 
prompt the giving. 

No better illustration, of two 
manners of giving, can be found than 
in the poem written by James Rus- 
sell Lowell, "The Vision of Sir 
Launfal." 

We see the knight leaving his cas- 
tle with pomp and in the full vigor 
of youth, in search of the much cov- 
eted "Holy Grail." He is acquaint- 
ed with the conditions necessary for 
the obtaining of this valuable relic 
and feels ready to meet them. There 
sits the beggar by the road, asking 
for alms. Sir Launfal in scorn 
tosses him a coin and hastens on his 
errand. 

After many years of unsuccessful 
searching, the knight again meets 
this same beggar, as he approaches 
his castle. His quest has been all 
in vain and he is returning home. 
He is an old man now, his wealth 
all gone and his spirit broken. His 
sole possession is a crust of bread. 
As the beggar appeals to him for 
food and drink, Sir Launfal shares 
with him this crust of bread and go- 
ing to a nearby ' stream, secures a 
cup of water which he gives to the 
beggar. 

We are all familiar with the re- 
mainder of the story, how the cup 
is transformed into the Holy Grail 
and the beggar changed into the like- 
ness of Christ. Here we have two 
Standards by which to judge the mo- 
tives which prompt our giving. Ap- 
ply them to your own experiences 
and decide for yourself, whether or 
not you have the true conception of 
the Christmas spirit. 

Y. M. C. A. 



"The Christmas Spirit" was the 
topic discussed last Sunday in Y. M. 
C. A. The Leader, Mr. Russell Ehr- 
hart, brought a timely message, 
touching on the nature of our Christ- 
mas gifts and the spirit in which 
we give. He called attention to the 
first Christmas more than nineteen 
hundred years ago when the world 
received its greatest gift, the Christ 
who died to redeem mankind from 
their sins. Since the present day 
custom of exchanging gifts at Christ- 
mas time had its origin from that 
time, we should allow the same spirit 
that was manifested by God in the 
gift of his son, prevail in our minds 
and hearts to-day when we give and 
receive gifts from our friends. The 
meeting was thrown open for gener- 
al discussion and the fact that many 
responded showed the subject to be 
one of common interest. 



Horstick: — (To Ruth Hughes) 
Miss Hughes. 

Ruth: Don't Miss Hughes( mis- 
use) me. 



SOCIAL 



Miss Olga Smith, of Reading, is 
visiting her sister, Miss Virginia 
Smith, at North Hall. 

Miss Louisa Williams is entertain- 
ing Miss McLaughlin, of York, sts- 
„ter of Mr. Roy McLaughlin. 

Mr. Eldridgo Stumbaugh has gone 
to his home in Greencastle to spend 
the holidays. 

A kitchen shower was held at 
Senior Hall on Thursday evening in 
honor of the birthday anniversary of 
Miss Ruth Huber. 

Mr. Wm. Keating left school Mon- 
day afternoon lor his home in Rome. 

ClicvPhiio Holds Joint 
Session 



Continued from Page 1 



Next came the sketch, from 
which also much could be learned. 
Some have said that no new sketches 
could be given, this one absolutely 
disproved that statement. It por- 
trayed in two acts the pre-nuptial 
actions of a college professor. The 
third act being the climax when the 
professor is happily married to the 
lady of his choice. 

The Olive Branch and Living 
Thots closed the Literary program. 
They were, as usual, distinctly 
humorous and distributed personali- 
ties without fear or favor. 

After the Literary program the 
Philo acted as hosts for a social hour 
during which light refreshments 
were served. 

PROGRAM FOR JAN. 5, 1917 

Vacation Happenings. .J. McGinness 

Reading H. Katerman 

Debate: Resolved, That our present 
electoral system of electing a 
President of the U. S. should be 
abandoned in favor of election by 
popular votes. 
Affirmative Negative 
H. White P. Wagner 

H. Snoke R. Swartz 

Music 

Parody O. Spessard 

Lloyd-George and his Policy 

E. C. Brunner 

Autobiography Clyde Lynch 

PHILO OFFICERS. 

The following officers have been 
elected in Philo to serve after Xmas: 
Pres. — Edwin Zeigler. 
V. Pres. — Frank S. Attinger. 
Rec. Sec. — Roy 0. McLaughlin. 
Cor. Sec. — Francis Snavely. 
Critic — Evan C. Brunner. 
Judge — George Haverstock. 
Editor — Benj. Baker. 
Janitor — Clyde De Hoff. 

Y. W. C. A. 

All those who attended the Y. W. 
C. A. meeting on Sunday enjoyed an 
excellent Christmas service led by 
Miss Miriam Oyer. After the Scrip- 
ture lesson a quartette composed of 
Misses Lorenz, Smith, Mutch and 
Miller, sang a Christmas carol. Miss 
Oyer spoke about the influence of 
Christianity. "What would this 
world of ours be like, if Christ had 
never been born?" Do we ever stop 
to realize that most of the best works 
of art, literature, music, architec- 
ture, sculpture have been due to the 
inspiration of Christianity? 



COLLEGE NEWS 



KALOZETEAN. 

The program of the Kalozetean 
Literary Society last Friday evening, 
although shorter than the usual pro- 
gram, was interesting throughout. 
The first number of the evening, "Na- 
tional Comment," by Jacob Gingrich, 
was a very good review of interest- 
ing • events of the last few weeks. 
Mr. Gingrich is a new-comer in the 
Society, and did very well in his first 
appearance on the program. Myrle 
Brown read an excellent paper on 
"The British Blacklist." The paper 
was a clear, concise account of this 
much misunderstood question, land 
showed the writer's insight into this 
matter of international concern. 
The piano duets by Messrs. Hilbert 
and Greer, were well rendered and 
greatly appreciated. The subject 
"Colonial America" was ably discuss- 
ed by Charles Frost. The subject 
was treated in a way which interest- 
ed everyone, and contrary to the 
usual paper on this subject was not 
filled with uninteresting dates which 
prove so monotonous to most persons. 
After a chorus by the society, Ed- 
ward Allen gave a very practical dis- 
cussion on "Improved Methods in 
Poultry Raising." Anyone contem- 
plating going into the business of 
raising poultry, could have secured 
many useful and serviceable hints 
which would be of practical value 
to him. 

PROGRAMME 
January 5, 1917 

Vacation Memories Dale Garber 

Social Life in the Colonies 

Paul Shannon 

Vocal Solo R. N. Keim 

China. America's Silent Partner. . 

H M. Gingrich 

Extempore 

Chorus Society 

Essay R. W. Williams 

Visitors cordially invited. 



SOPH'S BE VT FRESHMEN 



Foot Ball Men Given Their 
Annual Banquet 



Continued From Page 1 



tures. The first as well as most im- 
portant of these is the fact that our 
goal lin-j is the only one that the 
Army didn't cross in its entire sea- 
son. Then, too, the holding of Oli- 
phant to the small gains, as we did 
is remarkable. The Dartmouth game 
ir- one of the scores that should prob- 
ably be lower, but, considering the 
adverse conditions under which we 
labored. L. V. need not be ashamed 
of it. On Villanova, we showed up 
fine, but the Lehigh game displayed 
the seasons climatic team work. We 
should have captured the Lafayette 
nigskin, but made up by defeating 
St. Joe's 71-0; Muhlenburg, 6-0; the 
Indians. 33-0; and Susquehanna, 13-0 
Bucknell, 'lis true, defeated us in the 
final game, 8-0. but due to the mud- 
dv field, prohibiting fast end-run- 
ninfr. off., it. was a game which de- 
pended n:erely' on luck and that 
vvent against us. 

Summing un, however, we had an 
extremely better season than we ex- 
pected scoring 153 points to our op- 
ponents f)l and gringing hoime with 
hs thrre pig-skim- and wining the 
fhrce home games. 



The Freshies and Sophs resumed 
hostilities for a short time Monday 
aflernoon when they played their 
annual football game, but as had 
been predicted the 1919 representa- 
tives enjoyed the contest much more 
than their adversaries, the Sopho- 
mores, winning easily, 25 to 0. 

There was no doubt either in the 
minds of the players or spectator-; 
as to the outcome of the game, and 
interest was in the number of points 
the winners would be able to mus- 
ter together. "Nixie" Mackert 
scored three touchdowns, one of them 
from kick-off after a seventy yard 
run, and with Shetter were the 
"strong- men" in the Sophomore line- 
up. Kid Snavely scored the other 
touchdown for their team. 

The Freshmen went into the game 
knowing That they were clearly out- 
classed, and they put up a game fight 
despite the odds against them. Many 
of their number were learning the 
"rudiments" of the great college 
sport, and they only can tell how 
thankful they were when the con- 
test was called shortly after the be- 
ginning of the fourth quarter. 

Only once during the afternoon 
were the Freshmen in a position to 
score. By fine runs, in which the 
work of Baines was the most promi- 
nent, they advanced the ball close 
to their opponents' ten-yard line but 
could not show the reserve strength 
necessary to carry the pigskin across 
the line. 

Captain Lerew of the Sophomores 
can be proud of his team and of the 
record toade in this inter-class con- 
test, but we could not help admire 
the gameness of Simmondette's 
Freshmen, and the playing of such 
men as Baines, Haines, Zeigler and 
Costello. Lineup: 

Touchdowns: Mackert, 3: Snavely. 
Goal from touchdown, Mackert. Re- 
feree, Ross Swartz. Umpire, Russ 
"Rupn. Timekeeper. Rutherford. 
Head linesman, T. Goulden Foltz. 



Athletic Association 

Changes Constitution 



The constitution of the Athletic 
Association which had been in the 
hands of a committee for several 
weeks for the purpose of revision 
was finally submited to the Associa- 
tion and ratified. In their work the 
Continued From Page 4 




qP A TALBOT 

1 Arrow 

Hpt COLLARS 

arc curve cut to fit the 
shoulders perfectly fjg* 

CUigtt,ffeabody 6TCp;lnc.9ytateg 



WM. WALTZ 

Tonsorialist 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 

a specialty 
W. Main St. Annville,*. P 

Theatrical Costumes 
Academic Caps and Gowns 

ON A RENTAL BASIS 

WAAS & SON, Philadelphia 

Quality Work: 

Don't be satisfied with anything but the 
best. 

If you examine our shirt, collar and cuff 
work you will surely send yours to the 

Herstiey Laundry 

R.UFUS R. NESS, Agent 

tub RBtfpatn-BrocKway Lyceum 
Bureau 

PITTSBURGH, PENNA 

Furnishes Lectures, Entertainment 
a d Concert Companies for all occasions 

H. J. H El M BACH 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Anything in 
the Optical Line 
East Main St. ANNVILLE 

THE 

BLAZIER STUDIO 

Photographs of Quality 
LEBANON .:. PA. 

839 Cumberland Street 



Special Attention 

First Aid to Xmas Shoppers 

AT THE 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

A glance over our choice Holiday goods will convince you that 
our line is complete and up-to-date. 

SUGGESTIONS:— Pennants, Cushion Tops, College Seal Jewelry, Leath- 
er Banners and Cushion Tops with Seal, Fancy Box Stationery, Manicuring' Sets, 
Desk Sets, Brass Sets, Military Brushes, French Ivory Toilet Sets, Photo 
Albums, llolman and Scofield Bibles, Wallets, and Leather Goods, Xmas Gift 
Boxes, Alma Mater Song, Framed Art Pictures and all the Latest Fiction. 

NOTE OUR THKKK SPECIAL LINKS 

KodaKs—ParkBT Lucky Curve Fountain pbqs— Hopewell Dainties 

Bell Phone D, B. Bashore, Prop. Annville, Pa. 



When patronizing Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Basket Ball Team 

Wins First Game 



The bive Store 



flluaays Heliable 



VISIT DOUTRICH'S 

OVERCOAT FAIH 

Over Four Thousand Overcoats on display at 
this "Live Store." 

Every day was a banner day last week. You 
would have to pay $5.00 to $10.00 more for similar 
garments elsewhere. 

Step in Doutrich's and say Overcoats. You'll 
find the best here at $15.00, $20.00, $25.00. 



OUTRICH'S 

304 Market St. Ha^Fisburg, Pa, 



DR. SAMUEL B. GROH 
DENTIST 

Hippodrome Building 

750 Cumberland St. LEBANON 



You are correct if you get your 

LADilES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 



AT 



KINPORTS 



ANNVILLE, PA. 

Students' Discount. Packard & /merican Lady Shoe 
Arrow Collars and Shirts 



work. These two men are to be 
elected by the Association from three 
candidates nominated by the letter 
men, Coach and manager. 

Under the conditions of the new 
constitution, Charles Gemmil was 
elected manager of next year's foot- 
ball team; Miles Morrison, assistant 
manager; and Walter Deibler, adver- 
tising manager. The following were 
elected officers of the association: — 
President, Douglas Beidle; Vice 
President, Dale Garber; Secretary, 
John McGinnis; Treasurer, Daniel 
Walters. 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Cleaning and Pressing Done 
Main Street Annville 

"Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
DENTIST 

W. Main St. - AnnOille, Pa 

Athletic Association 

Changes Constitution 



Continued from Pa^e 3 



a large extent making the only radi- 
cal change in the method of electing 
managers and assistant managers of 
committee followed the old form to 
the various athletic teams. 

Instead of managers being elected 
by the association as a whole, which 
was the former method, the letter 
men of each sport together with the 
manager and coach will vote for this 
officer. Provision was also made, un- 
der the changed constitution, for two 
assistant managers. One of these 
will take care of the advertising and 
the other will perform the duties 
which have always constituted his 

When Patronizing 



OUR BIG OPTICAL OFFER 

FOR ONE DAY ONLY 
Thursday, Dec. 21st 

We will fit you with a pair of 
first quality spherical lenses 
either far or near in gold filled 
frames guaranteed, nose glasses, 
spectacles, or straight, that you 
desire. Regular value $3.50. 
During this sale only 




Eyes Examined Free. No Drops 
Used 

RUBIN & RUBIN 

Eye Sight Specialists, at Eagle 
Hotel Parlor, Annville, Pa., 
From 8 A. M. Until 9 P. M. 
Here Every Month 



Continued from Page 1 

other guard position was held by 
Shetter, whose playing was depend- 
able and brainy as usual. During 
the progress of the second half Mack- 
ert, Jaeger, Fishburn, and Barnhart 
were substituted, and their playing- 
enhances the work of Coach Guyer 
and Loomis in selecting the best 
team. 

The Lebanon team played their 
strongest game in the second half, 
but their cause was hopeless. Hol- 
linger proved his adeptness at foul 
shooting, and Miller, their diminu- 
tive forward, played a star game and 
deserved to be on the winning side. 
Line-up: 

Lebanon Lebanon Valley 

Boyer F Keating 

Miller F Swartz 

Fatchsk« C Seltzer 

Hollinger G Loomis 

Bell G Shetter 

Goals — Swartz, 10; Keating, 5; 
Seltzer, 3: Loomis, 1; Mackert, lr 
Fishburn, 1; Boyer, 4; Miller, 5; 
Patchske. 2; Hollinger, 2; Bell, 1. 
Foul goals — Hollinger, 10 out of 18; 
Loomis, 5 out of 10; Swartz, 4 out 
of 8. Substitutions: Y. M. C. A.— 
Jones *or Miller, Miller for Bell. 
Lebanon Valley — Mackert for Selt- 
zer, Fishburn for Loomis, Jaeger for 
Shetter, Barnhardt for Keating, Re- 
feree — Walter. Time — 20 minute 
halves. 

BURDAN'S 
ICE CREAM 

Made in Pottstown and 
Lebanon, Pa. 

KEEP WAR M 

Wear a 

WRIGHT L DITSON SWEATER 

Reversible Collar, Regular Jacket, V'Neck 
and Collarless styles. 

Catalogue mailed free 

WRIGHT &r DITSON 

344 Washington St. Bcston 

Just Received a New Supply 

Of Palms and Ferns fcr Decorating 
When Ordering Cut Flowers See 

D. P. LUHISKEYjviflfl 

Queen St. Annville, Pa. 



DID YOU SAY 

BATS? 
C. K. WRY'S 



GOT 'KM 



D. L. SAYL0R & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 



Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA 
Advertisers Mention That You Are From Lebanon Valley